Learn About Membership Types

American Library Association (ALA) membership is open to individuals, organizations and non-profits, and businesses interested in working together to change the world for the better through libraries and librarians.  


ALA members (photo)

There are a variety of memberships and dues rates to meet the needs of any individual, organization/library, or businessalong with opportunities to join divisions and round tables that focus on specific professional needs and interests.  

Please select one of the following for detailed information:

Personal Member

Personal Members-InternationalIncludes librarians who do not hold U.S. citizenship and who are not employed in the United States/US possessions.

Student Members

Student Joint ALA-State Library Association (Chapter) Member

Division Membership (must be an ALA member to join a division)

Round Table Membership (must be an ALA member to join a round table)

Organizational Member

Organizational Member-International

Corporate Member

Special Membership Categories

Not Sure How to Proceed?


In support of its mission, ALA maintains collaborative relationships with a variety of outside organizations.   These group join ALA as organizational members.

ALA members-2 (photo)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Affiliate organizations of the American Library Association are independent groups having purpose or interests similar to those of the Association. Pursuant to Article X, Section 1, of the ALA Constitution and upon application formally made by the proper officers, the ALA Council has voted to affiliate with a number of societies.

Chapters are state library associations in all fifty states, the District of Columbia, Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and regional library associations in the Mountain Plains, New England, Pacific Northwest, and Southeastern regions. Chapters provide geographic representation to the Council of the American Library Association. But are independent organization.

"Related groups” are those with which the American Library Association has a long-standing relationship, with interlocked governance structures in select cases.