Spectrum Doctoral Fellowship

About the Spectrum Doctoral Fellowship
An IMLS funded project in 2007, 2008, and 2013 designed to increase racial and ethnic diversity among our profession’s next generation of LIS leaders.

Administered by:

Office for Diversity logo

2013 Winner(s)

RaShauna Brannon

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

RaShauna’s research interests include digital literacy, digital inclusions, and diversity issues in libraries.  RaShauna has experience working in multiple library and educational settings including school, public, and academic libraries serving diverse communities, with most recent experience as an Electronic Resources Librarian. She holds a B.A. in English and African American Studies from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She obtained the Master of Library Science from North Carolina Central University.


LaVerne Gray

University of Tennessee Knoxville

LaVerne Gray earned her MLIS in Library and Information Science (Dominican University), MSEd in Educational Psychology (Northern Illinois University), and BA in Rehabilitation/Child Development at (Wilberforce University).LaVerne has published on themes related to outreach, teaching, and information literacy.  Her broad research interests include information literacy, critical theory, culturally responsive pedagogy, diversity, and academic library leadership


Myrna Morales

Simmons College

Myrna holds a B.A. in Urban Studies from Bates College, a Masters of Arts in Teaching from Brown University, and an MSLIS from Simmons College.  Myrna has a rich background in medical education, education and library and information science, and she looks for opportunities to impart her technology skills to those who organize to bring injustices to light.


Miraida Morales

Rutgers University

Miraida received her MLIS from Rutgers in May 2012 with a certificate in digital libraries.  As a student in the library program at Rutgers, she worked on a variety of digital library projects including launching a digital library of heraldry at the National Library of Puerto Rico in 2011.  She will be focusing on the information seeking behavior of multi-lingual users.  She has presented on digital libraries and taxonomy at NJLA and SLA, as well as presented posters at IFLA and NJLA. 


Mario Ramirez

University of California – Los Angeles

Mario is a founding member of the U.S. Chapter of Archivists without Borders, and co-chair of the Displaced Archives Project.  In addition to an M.S. in Library Science and Certificate in Archives and Records Management from Long Island University, C.W. Post, he holds a B.A. in American Studies from the University of California, Santa Cruz and an M.A. in Rhetoric from the University of California, Berkeley. Prior to working as an archivist, his studies and research focused primarily on film, art history, psychoanalysis, philosophy and racial politics in the U.S. and Latin America.


Elnora Tayag

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Elnora Kelly Tayag research interests include creating digital mechanisms to document and access collective memory, cultural heritage, and community-based collections, and exploring the role of media and cultural materials in developing social capital and information networks.  Elnora published her first book, Filipinos in Ventura County, as part of the Images of America series by Arcadia Publishing, 2011.  Elnora earned her Bachelor’s degree in Art History from UC Irvine, Master’s degree in Religion from Claremont School of Theology, and Master’s degree in Library Information Science from UCLA.