Ilene F. Rockman Instruction Publication of the Year Award

About the Ilene F. Rockman Instruction Publication of the Year Award This annual award recognizes an outstanding publication related to instruction in a library environment published in the preceding two years. The award honors Ilene F. Rockman's professional contributions to academic librarianship in the area of information literacy. This award is administered by the Instruction Section.

Administered by:

Association of College and Research Libraries logoInstruction Section logo

2014 Winner(s)

Wendy Holliday

head of academic programs and course support at Northern Arizona University

for their article “Talking About Information Literacy: The Mediating Role of Discourse in a College Writing Classroom”

“Holliday and Rogers’s study is important because it challenges us to think about how the words we use to describe the research process in the classroom affects student learning and engagement in research,” said award committee co-Chairs Lori DuBois of Williams College and Susanna Eng-Ziskin of California State University-Northridge.

In their study, Holliday and Rogers analyze how librarians and writing instructors’ word choices focusing on “sources” as containers instead of the ideas within them may lead students to focus on finding sources to fulfill the assignment parameters rather than engaging more fully with the information to learn about the research topic.


Jim Rogers

associate professor and director of the Intensive English Language Institute at Utah State University

for their article “Talking About Information Literacy: The Mediating Role of Discourse in a College Writing Classroom”

“Holliday and Rogers’s study is important because it challenges us to think about how the words we use to describe the research process in the classroom affects student learning and engagement in research,” said award committee co-Chairs Lori DuBois of Williams College and Susanna Eng-Ziskin of California State University-Northridge.

In their study, Holliday and Rogers analyze how librarians and writing instructors’ word choices focusing on “sources” as containers instead of the ideas within them may lead students to focus on finding sources to fulfill the assignment parameters rather than engaging more fully with the information to learn about the research topic.