Over the Rainbow Project book list

About the Over the Rainbow Project book list To recognize current quality non-fiction and fiction books that authentically express gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender experiences.

Administered by:

Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Round Table logo

2017 Top Ten Favorites

2017 Selection(s)

A Body, Undone: Living On After Great Pain

By Christina Crosby. NYU Press, 2016.

One month after her fiftieth birthday, the author becomes a quadriplegic after breaking her neck in a bicycle accident. In this memoir, she writes about her changing feelings toward her body, her relationship, and her own sense of self.


In the Dark Room

By Susan Faludi. Metropolitan Books/Henry Holt and Company, 2016.

The Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist tries to find the truth when her father shocks her with the news of her sex-change surgery. Questions of identity, rage, and history haunt her story: Hungarian or American, Magyar or Jew, victim or victimizer, man or woman? In the end, “in the universe, there is only one true divide, one real binary: life or death.” Everything else is open to interpretation, acceptance, or denial.


Another Brooklyn

By Jacqueline Woodson. HarperCollins, 2016.

For August, friendship was everything. It was the 1970s in Brooklyn. She and her three best girlfriends lived confident of their talents, dreaming of the future. But their Brooklyn was a dangerous place, where dreams were fleeting, and growing up female was not easy.  Woodson’s latest novel is an epic poem, honoring memories of girlhood, fragile community, and fate.


Ask a Queer Chick: A Guide to Sex, Love, and Life For Girls Who Dig Girls

By Lindsay King-Miller, Plume, 2016.

A series of essays about lesbian life based on the advice column of the same name. Topics are written to address both queer and straight readers and include dating, sexual relationships, being out at work, and finding allies.


Bettyville: A Memoir

By George Hodgeman. Viking, 2015.

A richly crafted memoir about a gay son and his aging octogenarian mother. As her health declines, the son returns to the small Missouri town and the house he grew up in, from New York City, to care for her. Despite the passage of time and the decline of both Betty’s and the town’s health, not much has changed in their relationship.


Boy, Erased: A Memoir

By Garrard Conley, Riverhead, 2016.

Conley, a son of a pastor, tells how his struggle with his sexuality brought him to checking into an ex-gay conversion therapy program during his late teens in 2004. He gives a stark look into how he survives the abusive program, struggles with his faith, and comes to terms with his sexuality.


The Firebrand and the First Lady: Portrait of a Friendship: Pauli Murray, Eleanor Roosevelt and the Struggle for Social Justice

By Patricia Bell-Scott. Knopf, 2016.

A chronicle of the friendship between First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, and Pauli Murray: granddaughter of a mixed-race slave, lawyer, civil rights activist, minister, and co-founder of the National Organization of Women. The book explores the professional and social cost of Murray’s race and gender, in the context of her correspondence with Roosevelt, mentions issues of her gender fluidity and same-sex relationships, and Roosevelt’s use of Murray’s advocacy for racial equality in her public writings.


The Imitation Game: Alan Turing Decoded

By Jim Ottaviani, illustrated by Leland Purvis, Abrams ComicArts, 2016.

A realistic, imaginative, well-drawn graphic novel exploring the life and death of the great mathematician and pioneer of artificial intelligence and computer science,  Alan Turing. His incredible feats during and after WWII were overshadowed by prosecution for being homosexual. As Ottaviani notes, “I wish I lived in a world that benefited from decades more of Alan Turing alive and well, thinking and discovering.”


Juliet Takes a Breath

By Gabby Rivera. Riverdale Avenue Books, 2016.

The coming-of-age story of a young woman learning what it is to be who she is.  Lesbian, Puerto Rican, New Yorker Juliet is running to something that isn’t what she expected and running from problems that follow along with her. A great story for anyone who has ever felt that love can’t replace understanding, that understanding comes in ways you never expected, and that heroes are what you make of them.


Stand By Me: The Forgotten History of Gay Liberation

By Jim Downs. Basic Books, 2016.

Downs has written an essential historical text on gay life during the “forgotten” time between 1969 and the beginnings of the AIDS crisis. Using documents from large metropolitan LGBT centers, he explores communities like the Metropolitan Community Church and those formed in book stores, proving the ‘70s were more than pride marches, sex, and discos.


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