IS Innovation Award

About the IS Innovation Award
This annual award recognizes a project that demonstrates creative, innovative, or unique approaches to information literacy instruction or programming.

Administered by:

Association of College and Research Libraries logoInstruction Section logo

2014 Winner(s)

Meredith Farkas

general education instruction coordinator at Portland State University

for their work on the software Library DIY

“The committee liked the DIY approach and was impressed by the scope of the project and ease of use,” said award committee co-Chairs Lori Dubois of Williams College and Susanna Eng-Ziskin of California State University-Northridge. “While many libraries have comprehensive information literacy tutorials, this project provides a model for libraries considering how to help students quickly answer questions as they are doing their research."

Library DIY is a system of learning objects at Portland State University that is designed to give students the quick answers they need for point-of-need support. The content and information architecture of Library DIY is designed to mirror a reference desk transaction; students can drill down to the specific piece of information they need rather than having to skim through a long tutorial to find what they’re looking for.


Amy Hofer

distance learning librarian at Portland State University

for their work on the software Library DIY

“The committee liked the DIY approach and was impressed by the scope of the project and ease of use,” said award committee co-Chairs Lori Dubois of Williams College and Susanna Eng-Ziskin of California State University-Northridge. “While many libraries have comprehensive information literacy tutorials, this project provides a model for libraries considering how to help students quickly answer questions as they are doing their research."

Library DIY is a system of learning objects at Portland State University that is designed to give students the quick answers they need for point-of-need support. The content and information architecture of Library DIY is designed to mirror a reference desk transaction; students can drill down to the specific piece of information they need rather than having to skim through a long tutorial to find what they’re looking for.


Lisa Molinelli

reference and instruction librarian at Portland State University

for their work on the software Library DIY

“The committee liked the DIY approach and was impressed by the scope of the project and ease of use,” said award committee co-Chairs Lori Dubois of Williams College and Susanna Eng-Ziskin of California State University-Northridge. “While many libraries have comprehensive information literacy tutorials, this project provides a model for libraries considering how to help students quickly answer questions as they are doing their research."

Library DIY is a system of learning objects at Portland State University that is designed to give students the quick answers they need for point-of-need support. The content and information architecture of Library DIY is designed to mirror a reference desk transaction; students can drill down to the specific piece of information they need rather than having to skim through a long tutorial to find what they’re looking for.


Kimberly Wilson-St. Clair

reference and instruction librarian at Portland State University

for their work on the software Library DIY

“The committee liked the DIY approach and was impressed by the scope of the project and ease of use,” said award committee co-Chairs Lori Dubois of Williams College and Susanna Eng-Ziskin of California State University-Northridge. “While many libraries have comprehensive information literacy tutorials, this project provides a model for libraries considering how to help students quickly answer questions as they are doing their research."

Library DIY is a system of learning objects at Portland State University that is designed to give students the quick answers they need for point-of-need support. The content and information architecture of Library DIY is designed to mirror a reference desk transaction; students can drill down to the specific piece of information they need rather than having to skim through a long tutorial to find what they’re looking for.