2004 Literary Landmarks

  • Rome/Floyd County Library, Rome, Ga. Ann Cornelisen, author of Torregreca: Life, Death, and Miracles and other works ardently and generously supported this library as a Friend of the Library and a benefactor from 1969 to 2003. Partners: The Friends of the Library and Sara Hightower Regional Library. Dedicated Nov. 12, 2004.

  • Oklahoma State University Library, Stillwater, Okla. The home of the literary papers of Angie Debo (1890-1988), daughter of sodbusters, noted author, courgeous scholar, champion for justice, passionate advocate for Native American rights, and first lady of Oklahoma history. Partners: Oklahoma State University Library and Friends of Libraries in Oklahoma (FOLIO). Dedicated Oct. 1, 2004.

  • Theodore Roethke House, Saginaw, Mich. Birthplace, childhood home, and lifelong inspiration for this Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, esteemed teacher, and mentor. Partners: Michigan Center for the Book and the Library of Michigan. Dedicated Sept. 29, 2004.

  • 481 Laurel Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. Birthplace of novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald (on on Sept. 24, 1896), who is internationally renowned for works such as The Great Gatsby, Tender is the Night, and This Side of Paradise. Partner: The Friends of the Saint Paul Public Library. Dedicated Sept. 24, 2004.

  • The Langhorne House, Danville, Va. In tribute to the lives and accomplishments of Irene Langhorne Gibson (1873-1956, “The Gibson Girl”) and Nancy Langhorne Astor (1879-1964, “Lady Astor”), and their families, this site was dedicated a Literary Landmark. Partners: Friends of the Danville Public Library and the Langhorne House Foundation. Dedicated Sept. 18, 2004.

  • The Tennessee Williams Visitors Center, Columbus, Miss. Author, playwright, and poet Thomas Lanier “Tennessee” Williams (1911-1983), was born in Columbus, Miss. In tribute to his life and writings, this site, formerly the rectory of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, was dedicated a Literary Landmark. Partners: The Friends of the Columbus-Lowndes Public Library and the Tennessee Williams Tribute Committee. Dedicated Sept. 10, 2004.

  • Matilda Moseley Home, Eatonville, Fla. This was the site of the home of the childhood best friend of Zora Neale Hurston who, throughout her writings, celebrated the rich culture of Eatonville as representative of rural, Southern African-descended folks. Partner: Black Caucus of the American Library Association. Dedicated June 28, 2004.

  • Home of Angie Debo, Marshall, Ill. Debo (1890-1988), daughter of sodbusters, courageous scholar, first lady of Oklahoma history, resided here. This town served as the subject of Prairie City, Debo’s literary gift to her family and community. Partners: Oklahoma State University Library and Friends of Libraries in Oklahoma (FOLIO). Dedicated April 17, 2004.

  • Casa Genotta, the Eugene O’Neill House, Sea Island, Ga. O’Neill lived here with his wife from 1931 to 1936, during which time he completed two plays, Ah Wilderness! and Days Without End. Partner: St. Simons Island Public Library. Dedicated Feb. 27, 2004.

  • Tennessee Williams House, Key West, Fla. Playwright Tennessee Williams resided here from 1949 to 1983. Partner: Florida Center for the Book. Dedicated Jan. 16, 2004.