Transforming Libraries - sample guidelines and standards

The Best Websites for Teaching and Learning honors websites, tools, and resources of exceptional value to inquiry-based teaching and learning as embodied in the American Association of School Librarians' Standards for the 21st-Century Learner.
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AASL is looking for a dynamic group of school librarians to serve on an editorial board responsible for the evaluation and revision of the association’s learning standards and program guidelines. Members of all facets and levels of the profession are invited to apply, ensuring the voices of all school librarians are reflected in the document. Complete details, including responsibilities, qualifications and application procedure can be found on the AASL website.

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Freedom of expression is an inalienable human right and the foundation for self-government. Freedom of expression encompasses the freedom of speech and the corollary right to receive information. Libraries and librarians protect and promote these rights by selecting, producing, providing access to, identifying, retrieving, organizing, providing instruction in the use of, and preserving recorded expression regardless of the format or technology.
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The latest round of anti-piracy legislation supposedly crafted to squelch online piracy has been thinly cloaked under the veil of copyright.
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ALA Library Fact Sheet 7 Please note that ALA cannot give legal advice. If you need legal advice, you should contact an intellectual property attorney.
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Libraries are leaders in trying to maintain a balance of power between copyright holders and users, in keeping with the fundamental principles outlined in the Constitution and carefully crafted over the past 200 years. In this role, we closely follow both federal and state legislation and make our voices heard when our issues are moving. Libraries are perceived as a voice for the public good and our participation is often sought in "friend of the court" briefs in important intellectual property cases.
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This piece was written in hopes of clarifying one aspect of the confusion—digital delivery of content to the “physical” classroom.
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This landmark legislation updated U.S. copyright law to meet the demands of the Digital Age and to conform U.S. law to the requirements of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) and treaties that the U.S. signed in 1996.
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On November 2nd, 2002, the "Technology, Education and Copyright Harmonization Act" (the TEACH Act), part of the larger Justice Reauthorization legislation (H.R. 2215), was signed into law by President Bush. Long anticipated by educators and librarians, TEACH redefines the terms and conditions on which accredited, nonprofit educational institutions throughout the U.S. may use copyright protected materials in distance education-including on websites and by other digital means--without permission from the copyright owner and without payment of royalties.
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Since the CONFU (Conference on Fair Use) discussions in the late 1990's, there have been numerous discussions concerning "best practices" of electronic reserve systems or e-reserves. The library and higher education associations did not endorse the CONFU discussions because the draft e-reserves guidelines were both highly proscriptive and did not provide the necessary flexibility characteristic of fair use. Some libraries chose to follow the CONFU guidelines that did emerge even though those guidelines - like many copyright guidelines - do not have the force or effect of law.
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