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  • Free, easy-to-use activities and curriculum introduce students ages 9-14 to computer science through themed projects that attract students with varied interests. Instructional videos guide students through each activity, so no coding experience is needed to teach!
    Resource Type:
    Lesson plans & activities
  • This program is based on Google’s CS First Music & Sound club curriculum and has been customized by Homer (AK) Public Library for a week-long coding camp to introduced kids ages 8-11 to basic computer science concepts while they create digital music, sound and video. Library staff worked with a music educator to deliver the program content.
    Resource Type:
    Lesson plans & activities
  • Two characters meet in a world and discover a surprising object. What happens next? It’s all up to students, who have the opportunity to use their imagination and creativity to code their own story.
    Resource Type:
    Lesson plans & activities
  • This self-paced course helps educators learn about computational thinking and how it can be integrated into a variety of subject areas. Divided into five units, the course provides real world examples as well as supplemental readings to support your learning.
    Resource Type:
    Professional development, Tutorial, Website
  • This online textbook covers many of the topics central to the ideas libraries need to embrace when supporting and providing computational thinking activities. Chapters topics include connected learning, design thinking, how children learn, and developing learning assessments.
    Resource Type:
    Strategies, Professional development
  • Limited available staff is a reality for most libraries, resulting in very real challenges for starting new programs in new content areas. When the Normal (IL) Public Library (NPL) began planning computational thinking (CT) activities we asked ourselves, What do you do to meet your community need when your in-house toolkit lacks necessary resources like computer science (CS) & CT knowledge, available staff, and time?
    Resource Type:
    Strategies, Ready to Code examples
  • Workforce development conversations and concerns about the readiness of today’s students for tomorrow’s IT field often focus on schools. Libraries, however, can play a vital role in connecting youth to computer science (CS) and computational thinking (CT) opportunities and connections for learning across time and place. How can libraries establish their role as an anchor and broker in the community for youth CT learning?
    Resource Type:
    Strategies, Ready to Code examples
  • While families with preschoolers have established times they visit the library, for example for weekly story hour, it is challenging to bring in these families for other programming. This is particularly true for topic areas that may be unfamiliar or unrecognized as connected to valuable preschool and early education literacies. How can we engage preschool learners and their families in quality computational thinking (CT)activities appropriate for that age group?
    Resource Type:
    Strategies, Ready to Code examples
  • Extra-curricular learning opportunities in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) are critical for young learners, often influencing future learning pathways. However, it is difficult to retain youth interest and engagement in voluntary programming, especially in middle and high school years when there is more choice and competing uses of time. How can I keep youth engaged?
    Resource Type:
    Strategies, Ready to Code examples
  • Library staff frequently question why they should integrate computational thinking (CT) literacy into the activities they provide with and for youth and families. Many have never heard the term before, are anxious about computers and technology in general, and/or may consider it another fad they are being asked to address. How can library staff gain deeper understanding of CT and comfort bringing CT literacy to the activities they provide for and with youth and families?
    Resource Type:
    Strategies, Ready to Code examples
  • The stereotypical computer scientist or engineer is frequently still an image that does not resonate with a large portion of the diverse youth in our country. Young people need to see themselves reflected in these communities and careers. How can libraries change the perception of who should participate in computing and technology-based educational opportunities and careers?
    Resource Type:
    Strategies, Ready to Code examples
  • Maryvale High School (AZ) has approximately 3000 students, 91% of whom are Hispanic/Latinx. 86% of students are eligible for subsidized lunch. Although we offer computer science (CS) AP classes, only about 5% of students take these courses. How can we ensure that more of our students have exposure to and opportunities for computational thinking (CT)?
    Resource Type:
    Strategies, Ready to Code examples
  • A report from Google about unconscious biases of educators, administrators, and students that can contribute to the persistence of underrepresentation of women and racial and ethnic minorities in CS and STEM more generally.
    Resource Type:
    Strategies, Professional development
  • It is rare that students from different schools have regular opportunities to work together and share resources. The need for collaboration is pressing in areas like computer science (CS) and engineering, where every school does not have access to the equipment or teacher expertise. Barriers include language, culture, and transportation. What strategies are effective in bringing students from diverse backgrounds together to expand learning opportunities and cultural competence?
    Resource Type:
    Strategies, Ready to Code examples
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