MOUSS Interlibrary Loan Committtee ARL Report

COLLECTIONS & ACCESS ISSUES
Prepared for the 2004 ALA Midwinter Meeting

ARL/SPARC meeting schedule at ALA Midwinter is available at: http://www.arl.org/arl/ala04m.html

Table of Contents

  1. Research Libraries and University Presses Issue Statement on Scholarly Communication /Year of the University Press
  2. Analyzing the Impact of the STM Mergers
  3. Results of the ARL Licensing of Electronic Journals Survey
  4. Revised Scholarly Communication Brochure Now Available
  5. PLoS Biology Provides Free Access to Top-Tier Biology Research
  6. SPARC Launches Open Access Newsletter and Forum
  7. The Hard Reality of Moving Toward an Open Access Model
  8. Digitization of Government Information
  9. Scholarly Tribes Conference Examines Disciplinary Traditions
  10. ARL Special Collections Task Force Update
  11. Papers from Conference on Audio Preservation Now Online
  12. AAU/ARL Global Resources Network (GRN) Reports Plans for 2004
  13. Assessing ILL/DD Services Study Results Released
  14. Electronic Reserves Statement Issued by Library Associations
  15. Electronic Reserves SPEC Survey Underway
  16. Portal Applications Working Group Update
  17. Scholars Portal Project Update
  18. LibQUAL+TM Update
  19. Development of e-QUALTM
  20. E-Metrics Participation Invited for 2004
  21. Changes in ARL Data Reporting Addressed in Web Cast
  22. New Measures Initiative: Review and Status Report Published
  23. SAILS Begins Phase II
  24. Solutions to the Scholarly Publishing Crisis in the Humanities
  25. PubMed Central – Three Years Old and Growing Stronger
  26. Research Library Contributions to Digital Science
  27. ARL Web Site Enhancements


1. Research Libraries and University Presses Issue Statement on Scholarly Communication/Year of the University Presses
In October the Association of American University Presses (AAUP) and ARL issued a Joint Statement on Scholarly Communication. The Statement sets forth the complementary roles of press and library within higher education, and indicates a strengthened commitment to cooperation and joint action. Included in the Statement is the announcement of the “Year of the University Press” in 2004. More information on this project will be distributed in early February. The Joint Statement may be found at: http://www.arl.org/arl/pr/aaup_arl_stmt.html.

2. Analyzing the Impact of the STM Mergers
At the end of May, ARL and its partners in the Information Access Alliance (IAA) sent a letter to the U.S. Department of Justice (DoJ) urging them to carefully examine the sale of Bertelsmann/Springer to Candover and Cinven, two British private equity firms. With the letter, the IAA sent a white paper on the topic with a call for a new standard for antitrust review of merger transactions in this industry by antitrust enforcement agencies. A public version of the white paper is available both on the ARL Web site http://www.arl.org/scomm/mergers/ and the new Information Access Alliance Web site http://www.informationaccess.org/. The US Department of Justice cleared the transaction in late August. The IAA will continue to refine its analysis and will explore strategies for addressing other anticompetitive behaviors of publishers, such as bundling. For more information, contact Mary Case marycase@arl.org.

3. Results of the ARL Licensing of Electronic Journals Survey
In early June, at the request of several members, a survey was sent to ARL directors soliciting information on how libraries were handling current negotiations for bundled electronic journal packages and other key issues in the area of licensing. Fifty-seven libraries responded, providing both valuable information and thoughtful comments on a complex topic for the benefit of the community. Some of the key findings are:

  • 22 or 39% of the responding libraries are planning to cancel or still considering canceling a bundled package this year.
  • 8 libraries reported that they are considering canceling ScienceDirect, 5 reported that they are considering canceling Emerald, and 5 are considering Wiley.
  • 16 of the 22 libraries that are considering canceling a bundle reported that their budget could no longer afford the package.
  • Most respondents will rely on ILL (15) or will attempt to license a core set of titles with document delivery for the remaining titles (10) to serve users’ needs for resources that may be canceled.
  • 12 respondents reported that Elsevier included restrictions on the library’s ability to use a subscription agent for electronic collections.
  • 48 (86%) of the respondents indicated that they have bottom-line positions that will make or break a deal. The most frequent items mentioned were governing law and venue (19), remote access (11), indemnifications (18), and price (11).
  • 25 libraries (44%) indicated that they were subscribing only to electronic versions when both print and electronic exist. 43 libraries (75%) indicated that they are canceling print versions when they also subscribe to the electronic editions.

A detailed report was e-mailed to all member representatives on July 15 by Mary Case.

4. Revised Scholarly Communication Brochure Now Available
The Create Change brochure has been revised and is available from ARL. Designed for campus distribution, it outlines the challenges faced by scholarly communications and lists potential actions for faculty to consider. The new edition of the brochure features a colorful new design and size, updated statistical data, and information on open access. Brochures may be purchased for $10 per bundle of 50 copies directly from ARL's fulfillment service, PMDS arl@pmds.com. Requests for a few complimentary copies may be sent to MaShana Davis at mashana@arl.org. The revised text is also available on the Create Change Web site for downloading and local adaptation http://www.createchange.org/resources/brochure.html. The Create Change brochure is a joint project of ARL, ACRL, SPARC, and SPARC Europe.

5. PLoS Biology Provides Free Access to Top-Tier Biology Research
ARL and SPARC joined a coalition of major library and public interest organizations in praising the October 13 premier of the first "open access" journal published by the Public Library of Science (PLoS), a nonprofit organization of scientists and physicians. PLoS Biology http://biology.plosjournals.org/, a monthly peer-reviewed journal available free online, features research of exceptional significance, including several groundbreaking articles that recently have received extensive coverage in the worldwide news media. PLoS is employing a new model for scientific publishing in which research articles are freely available to read and use through the Internet. The costs of publication are recovered not from subscription fees--which limit information access and use--but from publication fees paid by authors out of their grant funds and from other sources. For further information, see http://www.arl.org/arl/pr/plos_biology.html.

6. SPARC Launches Open Access Newsletter and Forum
The Free Online Scholarship (FOS) Newsletter, dormant since September 2002, has been restarted as the monthly SPARC Open Access Newsletter. It continues to be written by Peter Suber and offers news and analysis of the open-access movement--the worldwide effort to disseminate scientific and scholarly research literature online, free of charge and free of unnecessary licensing restrictions. Also, the FOS Forum has become SPARC Open Access Forum.

The newsletter is available online at https://mx2.arl.org/Lists/SPARC-OANews/Message/95.html. All subscribers to the FOS newsletter and forum are automatically subscribers to the new SPARC edition. If you are not already a subscriber, get instructions on how to sign up for the free newsletter and forum at http://www.arl.org/sparc/soa/.

7. The Hard Reality of Moving Toward an Open Access Model
During ARL's 143rd Membership Meeting in October, Mary Case, Director of ARL's Office of Scholarly Communication, opened a panel discussion on "The Hard Reality of Moving toward an Open Access Model." Professor Stuart Shieber, Harvard University, talked about why journals need not be so expensive. Using the JAIR Model (an open access journal in artificial intelligence), he pointed out how open access e-journals can succeed. However, the reality of moving toward an open access model will be hard on those in scholarly publishing, whether they publish commercial or noncommercial journals.

Heather Joseph, President of BioOne, followed with an analysis of publishing by scholarly societies that reflected the difficulties of moving toward open access. She said that under the current subscription model, societies recoup up to 70% of their costs from subscription fees--under open access, who will cover these costs? To define the real costs involved in publishing, BioOne is systematically examining the past three years of financial data from a representative cross-section of participating publishers. This data will help the societies determine what level of revenue would be necessary to make the transition to open access. Ultimately, societies will be more apt to move to open access as clear reliable sources of funding are identified. Background papers, slides, and summaries of all October 2003 Membership Meeting presentations appear on the ARL Web site at http://www.arl.org/arl/proceedings/143/.

8. Digitization of Government Information
In response to environmental pressures and in discussions with directors of ARL regional Federal Depository Libraries, ARL has developed a preliminary discussion document to establish a coordinating mechanism, initiative, or organization to formulate and implement a North American Digitization Plan for historical government documents. (See "A North American National Digitization Plan for Retrospective Government Documents" http://www.arl.org/arl/proceedings/143/digitization.pdf)

This initiative proposes a cooperative project to coordinate the digitization of government documents, and ultimately, other public domain information. The proposal is being developed in consultation with the American Association of Law Libraries and the Government Printing Office. In October, there was a briefing for ARL Directors on the proposal as well as the results of a recent ARL survey of Federal depository Libraries http://www.arl.org/arl/proceedings/143/. For more information, contact Prue Adler prue@arl.org.

9. Scholarly Tribes Conference Examines Disciplinary Traditions
The ARL conference on "Scholarly Tribes and Tribulations: How Tradition and Technology Are Driving Disciplinary Change," held on October 17 in Washington, D.C., attracted over 140 participants. The meeting explored how information technology is changing the way scholars work and communicate, and at the same time, how scholars' disciplinary traditions are shaping how technology is used. An enthusiastic audience heard scholars in the physical and life sciences, the social sciences, and humanities.

The keynote address was given by Blaise Cronin, Professor of Information Science, Indiana University. The disciplinary scholars included Milton Corn, M.D., Associate Director, NIH; Michael Lesk, Professor, Rutgers University; John Unsworth, Dean of the Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; and Barbara O'Keefe, Dean, School of Communication, Northwestern University. The afternoon included concurrent discussion sessions in the sciences, humanities, and social sciences. Clifford Lynch, Executive Director, CNI, moderated the closing panel and shared his thoughts for future steps.

Presentations are available at http://www.arl.org/scomm/disciplines.html.

10. ARL Special Collections Task Force Update
The ARL Special Collections Task Force has significantly advanced two of its agenda items in the last six months: exposing hidden collections and training and recruitment for special collections professionals.

Exposing Hidden Collections: In September, the Task Force sponsored a working conference at the Library of Congress to explore the challenges of providing access to uncataloged, unprocessed, or underprocessed archival, manuscript, and rare book materials. Speakers sparked lively discussion among the 190+ participants that in turn led to a series of specific recommendations for how the community could address the challenge. One of the major recommendations issuing from the conference was identification and promotion of a shared commitment to certain themes and subjects to encourage cooperative action among libraries and archives to process this material. To advance this goal, a web-based survey has been developed to assess the interest of libraries and archives in cooperative projects 1) on the theme of women, 2) on the theme of advertising, 3) in the format of pamphlets and printed ephemera, and/or 4) from the period 1865 and the end of the American Civil War through 1918 and the end of World War I. The survey will be conducted early in 2004. Please encourage participation.

Another recommendation that emerged from the conference is local development of inventories of unprocessed special collections or archival materials that could be shared among libraries and archives as well as with potential users. Yale University is the first library to contribute an inventory to a web site established for this purpose. Reports from other libraries and archives are encouraged and will be added to the web site as they are received. See http://www.arl.org/collect/spcoll/unprocdsc.html for details.

In addition, the Task Force 1) is developing a position statement that will encourage libraries and archives to expose hidden collections through some form of expedited access, 2) established an Inventory Committee to recommend an optimal technical strategy for a comprehensive inventory of unprocessed collections that includes establishing cooperative ties to the PCC (Program for Cooperative Cataloging) and with the group revising the rare book cataloging standard; and, 3) will explore an ACRL/RBMS pre-conference on using collection level records to deal with backlogs of unprocessed special collections.

Training and Recruitment of Special Collections Professionals: Throughout the work of the Special Collections Task Force, the urgent need to develop the next generation of special collections librarians and administrators has been a recurring theme. A small working meeting was held in November 2003 that brought together library directors, special collections librarians and archivists, and library and information science educators to discuss possible responses to this critical situation. The Task Force will develop a white paper identifying and articulating the issues raised at this meeting and describing building blocks that already exist. The paper will recommend multiple approaches to careers, a high degree of flexibility, and the need to build strong partnerships. A summary of the meeting is available http://www.arl.org/collect/spcoll/SCTFmins1103.html.

For more information on the work of the Special Collections Task Force, see the ARL Web site http://www.arl.org/collect/spcoll/ or contact Judith Panitch panitch@email.unc.edu.

11. Papers from Conference on Audio Preservation Now Online
On July 24 - 26, ARL was a cosponsor of "Sound Savings: Preserving Audio Collections" along with the Preservation and Conservation Studies program at the University of Texas at Austin, the Library of Congress, and the National Recording Preservation Board. Many of the papers are now available at http://www.arl.org/preserv/sound_savings_proceedings/index.html. A printed volume of proceedings will be available in mid-2004.

12. AAU/ARL Global Resources Network Reports Plans for 2004
The December 2003 Update Report on the AAU/ARL Global Resources Network was recently issued. http://www.arl.org/collect/grp/. Highlights include:

  • The “Global Resources Program” has been reframed as the "Global Resources Network" (GRN).
  • A new vision statement describes GRN as a “voluntary and collaborative initiative that will pursue two complementary approaches in developing a new and more robust model for international information. A series of discrete projects will focus on significantly expanding the depth, breadth, quantity, range of formats, and variety of international information resources available to students and scholars. A second, broad-based, long term, and necessarily evolutionary program will minimize unnecessary duplication among and across library collections. The Network could be partially funded from any resultant savings, in conjunction with ongoing participant support.”
  • Statements of Goals and Outcomes and Principles of Participation and Fees have been drafted and will evolve with input from the various stakeholders. (See the December 2003 Update Report).
  • As of December 9, 71 ARL members voluntarily contributed $1,500 apiece providing ARL with $106,500 of bridge funding to support the GRN during the next year.
  • Dan Hazen, on part-time loan from Harvard to ARL to manage the GRN, was recently named Head of the Collection Development Department for Harvard's Widener Library. Eudora Loh has been appointed an ARL Visiting Program Officer to transition into the role of part-time Director of the GRN. Dora is currently Latin American and Iberian Bibliographer at UCLA and chaired the GRN Latin Americanist Research Resources Project Advisory Committee.
  • During the fall, ARL and CRL shared information intended to position CRL to provide oversight for management and operational support for the GRN projects that request such assistance, and also to promote synergies, facilitate communications, and exploit efficiencies among and across all these projects. The first two projects expected to migrate to CRL are the German Resources Project and the Latin Americanist Research Resources Project.
  • Updates on the six GRN projects are available at: http://www.arl.org/collect/grp/vision/index.html.

13. Assessing ILL/DD Services Study Results Released
The Assessing ILL/DD Services Study is ARL’s third effort in the past decade to measure the performance of interlibrary loan operations in North American libraries. The activity is part of ARL’s New Measures Initiative. The study tracked performance of mediated and user-initiated ILL/DD operations in 72 research, academic, and special libraries including unit cost, fill rate, and turnaround time for mediated borrowing and lending services. These same measures were also taken for seven user-initiated services.

Mary Jackson is the principal investigator for the study and is assisted by Tom Delaney, Coordinator, Interlibrary Loan Services, Colorado State University; and Bruce Kingma, consulting economist for the previous study and Associate Dean at Syracuse University School of Information Studies.

In September ARL distributed the final versions of the individual institutional reports. ARL will publish a final report and sponsor a series of workshops to disseminate the findings. In addition, a briefing on the results of the study will be given at the RUSA ILL Discussion Group on Saturday, January 10, 2004. Mary Jackson’s article, “Assessing ILL/DD Services Study: Initial Observations,” in ARL: A Bimonthly Report of Research Library Issues and Actions from ARL, CNI, and SPARC, no. 230/231, October /December 2003 describes the findings and may be found at: http://www.arl.org/newsltr/230/illdd.html. For additional information, contact Mary Jackson mary@arl.org.

14. Electronic Reserves Statement Issued by Library Associations
"Applying Fair Use in the Development of Electronic Reserves Systems" is a new statement developed by Georgia Harper (University of Texas System) and Peggy Hoon (North Carolina State University) for the library association members of the Shared legal Capability (ALA, AALL, ARL, MLA, and SLA). This statement articulates how institutions are currently applying fair use to copyrighted materials included in electronic reserves systems. In addition, the statement provides general guidance on design and operation of systems that are both compliant with copyright law and take full advantage of fair use and library exemptions that are central elements of the law. The statement may be found at: http://www.arl.org/access/eres/eres.shtml.

In addition, ARL has developed a list of libraries that have used the fair use provisions as the basis for their electronic reserves policies. The list may be found at: http://www.arl.org/access/eres/erespolicies.shtml. For additional information, contact Mary Jackson mary@arl.org.


15. Electronic Reserves SPEC Survey Underway
Recent changes to the U.S. copyright law, including passage of the TEACH Act, has also intensified interest in copyright as it pertains to electronic reserves. Expanded options for the electronic delivery of course materials, such as course management systems, are also affecting library practices.

A SPEC survey on electronic resources seeks to identify best practices in the management of electronic reserves services, particularly the various methods of delivery of electronic course materials and how libraries are asserting their ‘fair use’ rights. Results of the survey will be distributed in early 2004. For additional information, contact Mary Jackson mary@arl.org.

16. Portal Applications Working Group Update
ARL seeks to foster the definition and development of portals for research libraries and the communities they serve and to ensure ARL’s presence in discussions of similar initiatives advocating the integration of information technology and content for the benefit of the academic and research communities. In June, ARL hosted a meeting just prior to the ALA/CLA Annual Conference on Portals and Authentication Services. That session featured presentations by several librarians from ARL member institutions about how authentication services are being integrated into their portals, how vendors of portal products are addressing the variety of authentication services on campuses and the issues in implementing portals in those environments. The January 2004 Forum on Portal Applications will focus on white papers written by IMS/CNI and OCLC on learning management systems and portals. The meeting is scheduled for Friday, January 9, 2004 from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon in the Garden Room of the US Grant Hotel.

The ARL Portal Applications Working Group will conclude its work in 2004 when it issues the results of a report on ARL member library activity regarding portal applications. However, ARL will continue to advance an agenda of promoting integration of information technology and content for the benefit of the academic and research communities with guidance from the Collections & Access Issues Committee. For additional information, contact Mary Jackson mary@arl.org.

17. Scholars Portal Project Update
Three research libraries successfully launched the Scholars Portal in the collaborative Scholars Portal Project with Fretwell-Downing, Inc. (FD) and ARL. During 2003 Iowa State University, the University of Arizona, and Arizona State University have implemented federated discovery and delivery tools for their campuses using FD software (ZPORTAL, Z2Web, and related FD products). The remaining four participants expect to introduce the software to their campuses by early 2004. Additional details are included in the November 2003 Status Report and Update, available at:
http://www.arl.org/access/scholarsportal/SPupdate1103.htm. For additional information, contact Mary Jackson mary@arl.org.

18. LibQUAL+TM Update
LibQUAL+TM is a Web-based survey that measures users’ perceptions of library service from the perspectives of affect of service, information control, and library as place. Participants in the spring 2003 LibQUAL+TM survey included more than 125,000 users from 308 college and university libraries, community college libraries, health sciences libraries, military libraries, public libraries, and state libraries in the U.S., Canada, the U.K., and the Netherlands. The results of the spring 2003 survey are available for purchase in a series of 11 volumes that present summary data for the participating groups of libraries http://www.libqual.org/documents/admin/sp2003results1.html. Two hundred libraries, including new participants in France and Sweden, are registered to participate in the spring 2004 LibQUAL+TM survey. For more information see http://www.libqual.org/index.cfm.

19. Development of e-QUALTM
The ARL e-QUALTM project is adapting the LibQUAL+TM survey to the digital library environment in order to develop a user-focused assessment process for digital library service. The development of e-QUALTM is partially supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation, National Science Digital Library (NSF/NSDL). The e-QUALTM team is developing an initial set of survey questions based on interviews, site visits, and focus groups with digital library users. In 2004, a call for participation will be issued to test the proposed questionnaire. For more information, contact Martha Kyrillidou martha@arl.org.

20. E-Metrics Participation Invited for 2004
In an October 7 letter to ARL directors, member libraries were invited to participate in the E-Metrics test implementation scheduled for October 2003–summer 2004. The test will prepare libraries for collecting data that describe electronic resources as proposed through the E-Metrics project and will demonstrate the practicality of ongoing collection and publication of data on electronic resources. The pilot process is open at no cost to all participants who supported the E-Metrics project financially in the past; new participants may join the pilot for $2,000. Over 40 libraries are expected to participate. For more information, contact Martha Kyrillidou martha@arl.org.

21. Changes in ARL Data Reporting Addressed in Web Cast
Informed by lessons learned from the New Measures Initiative over the last five years, the ARL Statistics and Measurement Committee decided on the following changes: (a) in the ARL Statistics, the “volumes held” category will be revised to account for the positive impact of collaborative de-duping activities that are taking place as a result of volumes transferred or de-accessioned to a shared remote facility; (b) a series of questions will move from the ARL Supplementary Statistics to the annual ARL Statistics starting in 2004, after 10 years of testing; (c) the data elements collected through the ARL E-Metrics pilot will be moving into a regular ARL Supplementary Statistics collection cycle starting in 2004; and (d) the ARL Membership Criteria Index will be included in the ARL Statistics publication starting with the 2002–03 edition. On October 9, ARL offered a 90-minute Web cast presentation on issues related to the ARL statistics, including these changes in data collection. The archived Web cast is viewable free of charge at http://www.arl.org/training/webcast/ondemand.html.

22. New Measures Initiative: Review and Status Report Published
In "Mainstreaming New Measures," Julia C. Blixrud takes stock of new measures in rersearch libraries in a special double issue of the ARL Bimonthly Report 230/231 (Oct./Dec. 2003). The 32-page report documents a rich and varied set of new measures projects undertaken by ARL and some of its member libraries in recent years. The measurement activities covered in the issue include the topics of library user satisfaction, electronic resources, learning outcomes, library impact on research, cost-effectiveness, utilization of library space, and organizational capacity. The issue is available online at http://www.arl.org/newsltr/230/.

23. SAILS Begins Phase II
Forty libraries will participate in Phase II of the ARL/Kent State University Project SAILS (Standardized Assessment for Information Literacy Skills), a research effort to develop a standardized survey instrument for assessing information literacy skills on a programmatic level. The instrument being designed and tested is based on the outcomes defined by the ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education. Phase II will continue to test both the items in the survey as well as how best to administer the instrument within different library and academic settings. For more information, contact Julia Blixrud jblix@arl.org.

24. Solutions to the Scholarly Publishing Crisis in the Humanities
John Unsworth, the new Dean of the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, contributed a paper to the 2003 Annual Meeting of the American Council on Learned Societies about the Crisis in Scholarly Publishing in the Humanities. In the paper he describes a number of solutions to the crisis including broadening the definition of tenurable work to include substituting several scholarly articles for “the book” and embracing a new genre of scholarship, thematic research collections. Another solution to this crisis, he concluded, “is plain and simple, to reach a larger audience.” See “The Crisis in Scholarly Publishing in the Humanities,” in ARL: A Bimonthly Report of Research Library Issues and Actions from ARL, CNI, and SPARC, no. 228, June 2003 http://www.arl.org/newsltr/228/crisis.html.

25. PubMed Central – Three Years Old and Growing Stronger
NLM’s Edwin Sequeira updated the ARL community about PubMedCentral (PMC). PMC is the National Library of Medicine’s (NLM) digital archive of medical and life sciences journal articles. “Most people who know about PMC probably associate it only with free access journals but PMC is equally about archiving and the integration of journal literature with other research resources, such as genetic sequence data. Also, in 2002, NLM began planning a project to scan, cover to cover, the complete run of back issues of a PMC journal that are not already available in electronic form, in return for the permanent rights to archive and distribute the scanned material freely.” See “PubMed Central – Three Years Old and Growing Stronger,” in ARL: A Bimonthly Report of Research Library Issues and Actions from ARL, CNI, and SPARC, no. 228, June 2003
http://www.arl.org/newsltr/228/pubmed.html.

26. Research Library Contributions to Digital Science
Berkeley’s David Messerschmitt undertook a thoughtful analysis of how the research library community might contribute to the building of a new Advanced Cyberinfrastructure Program (ACP). An NSF Blue-Ribbon Panel has recommended development of the ACP to support close coordination of theory, experiment and collaboration among digital scientists. Messerschmitt argues that research libraries house the core competencies and expertise relevant to ACP and its challenges. However, he also notes that the natural organization of scientific repositories around disciplinary needs presents challenges to the institutionally based organization predominant in the research library community. See “Opportunities for Research Libraries in the NSF Cyberinfrastructure Program” by David G. Messerschmitt, Roger A. Strauch Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and Acting Dean, School of Information Management and Systems, University of California, Berkeley, and Member of the NSF Blue-Ribbon Advisory Panel on Cyberinfrastructure, in ARL; A Bimonthly Report on Research Library Issues and Actions from ARL, CNI, and SPARC, no. 229, August 2003 http://www.arl.org/newsltr/229/cyber.html.

27. ARL Web Site Enhancements
Duane Webster’s monthly electronic E-News for ARL Directors is now posted on the ARL Web site at http://www.arl.org/enews. In addition, a new feature was added to the ARL home page showcasing a member institution. The University of California, Davis was the first to be highlighted. For additional information, contact Judith Matz judith@arl.org.