Ticketed Events and Preconferences

For a guide to all RUSA programs and room locations at the annual conference in Washington D.C., go here.

( events requiring ticket purchases)

Each year RUSA offers several ticketed events at the Annual Conference, including the Literary Tastes Breakfast, that provide opportunities for networking, learning and fun! RUSA members get the best rates on these events—if you’re not a RUSA member, join ALA and RUSA now at www.ala.org/membership or add RUSA to your current ALA membership by calling 1-800-545-2433, option 5.

Registration for these events and the Annual Conference is now open at www.ala.org/annual, and advance registration rates are good until May 14, 2010. Ticket sales for these events will close Sunday, June 20, and we will not offer at-the-door sales. We encourage you to register early to guarantee your spot!

Remember, you can register for ticketed events and preconferences without registering for the Annual Conference—simply select “Ticketed Events and Preconferences Only” as your registration type, then select your event(s) from the list in the next step.

Literary Tastes Breakfast

Sunday, June 27, 8-10 a.m.
This beloved RUSA tradition is a not-to-be-missed event for both book lovers attending conference, and those non-conference attendees who love literature, too. Attendees will enjoy a scrumptious breakfast while listening to the best writers of the year ruminate on their work, the writing process, read from their current works, or speak about their upcoming publications. Past speakers have included Khaled Hosseini, Nathaniel Philbrick, Edward P. Jones, and Susan Elizabeth Phillips.

Preconferences

Behind the Genealogy Reference Desk: Our Capital’s Hidden Genealogy Gems
Friday, June 25, 2010 from 8:30a.m. to 5p.m. Held at the Daughters of the American Revolution Library, 1776 D. Street NW, Washington, DC
Sponsored by the RUSA History Section (HS) and made possible with generous support from ProQuest

This full-day workshop will be held at the Daughters of the American Revolution Library in Washington, D.C. Speakers and topics will include Megan Lewis, reference coordinator from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum; a representative from the Daughters of the American Revolution; and an expert in Native American research. Additionally, noted genealogist John Humphrey will show us how to make the most of our time and resources when researching in our nation’s capital. Advance Registration (through May 14): RUSA member, $100; ALA member, $145; non-member, $220; student and retired members, $75.
Onsite Registration (May 14-June 20): RUSA member, $125; ALA member, $170; non-member, $245; student and retired members, $100.
Register now at www.ala.org/annual.

Reference Evolution: Envisioning the Future, Remembering the Past
Friday, June 25, 2010 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Conference hotel (TBD, April 2010)
Sponsored by the RUSA Machine Assisted Reference Section (MARS) and Reference Services Section (RSS)

Come join us for a lively discussion of the current state of reference and user services, looking beyond the hype to see where things are actually headed. Our speakers will offer a “state of the union” on our profession, acknowledging traditional reference tools and skills that remain relevant, and projecting how newer technologies will better serve our patrons.
Advance Registration (through May 14): RUSA member, $175; ALA member, $195; non-member, $220; student and retired members, $150.
Onsite Registration (May 14-June 20): RUSA member, $195; ALA member, $215; non-member, $245; student and retired members, $165.
Register now at www.ala.org/annual.

Interlibrary Loan Statistics: What We Gather, How We Use Them, and Who We Provide Them To
Friday, June 25, 2010 from 8:30a.m. to 12:30p.m.
Conference hotel (TBD, April 2010)
Sponsored by the RUSA Sharing and Transforming Access to Resources Section (STARS)
This half-day preconference will help attendees to sort through the myriad of ILL statistics available from a variety of sources and how to use these numbers to make decisions about staffing, collection development and other important workplace issues. You’ll gain practical knowledge regarding the creation of reports, manipulation of canned reports supplied by vendors, and how to use this data to provide quality service.
Advance Registration (through May 14): RUSA member, $140; ALA member, $155; non-member, $175; student and retired members, $120.
Onsite Registration (May 14-June 20): RUSA member, $155; ALA member, $170; non-member, $190; student and retired members, $135.
Register now at www.ala.org/annual.

Programs

For a guide to all RUSA programs, times and room locations at the annual conference in Washington D.C., go here.

With the exception of the Literary Tastes Breakfast, conference registration is required to attend the programs listed below. Advance registration for the 2010 Annual Conference opens January 4. Registration will be available online, as well as by phone, mail or fax. More information is available at www.ala.org/annual.

RUSA President’s Program

President’s Program: For the Love of Reference
Monday, 1:30-3:30p

Reference and readers’ advisory work are among the most engaging specialties in librarianship, inspiring great devotion among their practitioners and fans. Non-librarian researchers who dig for information as part of their job derive many of the same satisfactions from their work as reference librarians. This year’s RUSA President’s Program explores the twin appeals of information discovery and fulfilling users’ needs that drive the devotion to reference and readers’ advisory work. The presenters will be a mix practicing reference librarians, library educators and information diggers who are researchers for people like fiction authors and fact checkers for news organizations.

Literary Tastes Breakfast

Sunday, 8-10 a.m.

This beloved RUSA tradition is a not-to-be-missed event for both book lovers attending conference, and those non-conference attendees who love literature, too. Attendees will enjoy a scrumptious breakfast while listening to the best writers of the year ruminate on their work, the writing process, read from their current works, or speak about their upcoming publications. Past speakers have included Khaled Hosseini, Nathaniel Philbrick, Edward P. Jones, and Susan Elizabeth Phillips. Unlike other RUSA programs, this is a ticketed event; tickets will be available for purchase when general conference registration opens January 4, 2010.

Programs: Saturday, June 26

The (Screen) Casting Couch: Tips and Tricks to Effectively Use Screencasting Tools for Library Instruction
Saturday, 10:30a-12p

Screencasting software can be used for a variety of purposes—from standardizing staff development to creating interactive instructional tools for library patrons. Join us for a session exploring best practices and demystifying the options for creating screencasts. We will examine popular screencasting software such as Jing, Illuminate, Captivate, and Camtasia.

International Interlibrary Lending and Borrowing: Getting Started and Moving Forward
Saturday, 1:30-3:30p

A panel of interlibrary loan (ILL) practitioners from institutions experienced in international ILL will discuss how they have overcome problems encountered with international lending and borrowing using strategies applicable to all types and sizes of institutions. Panelists will discuss citation verification, lending library identification, copyright, customs, payment, shipping and language barriers.

Readers’ Advisory Research and Trends Forum
Saturday, 4-5:30p

The Readers’ Advisory Research and Trends Forum showcases creative thinking in all areas related to readers’ advisory (RA), including reference, adult services and collection development. Come join your colleagues in this interactive conversation and learn from a range of experts exploring the cutting edge of RA.

The A-Z of Electronic Reference Product Development
Saturday, 4-5:30p

This program will feature speakers from throughout the completed electronic reference product development cycle. Attendees will learn more about product development—from conception to product launch—and how they can get involved directly with publishers to help shape products that best suit user needs.

Programs: Sunday, June 27

To Protect and Serve: Is Digitization Good for Your Historical Collections?
Sunday, 10:30a-12p

The large, primary source digitization projects created by archives, larger public libraries and state agencies have come of age, and this program presents an opportunity for future projects large or small to learn from their challenges and successes. A panel of librarians and staff from the various types of libraries and archives who helped make these sites possible will discuss ways to fund, manage and gather materials in your state or at your institution, as well as how to promote your own historical materials.

Smart Technologies for Tough Economic Times: Using Innovative Technologies to Enhance Service and Extend Your Library’s Reach Without Breaking the Budget
Sunday, 10:30a-12p

As libraries everywhere face budget cuts, investigating new technologies may not seem like a top priority. But technology doesn’t need to be expensive: free or low-cost software programs can enhance and extend your library’s services, regardless of its size and budget. If your service goals are colliding with the realities of budget, time, staff, and IT support, come hear from librarians working in diverse settings how they have used budget-friendly technological solutions to meet such challenges.

How Shared is Shared? Remote Storage and Cooperative Collection Building
Sunday, 10:30a-12p

Faced with the challenges of balancing the costs and benefits of maintaining print collections at the local level, libraries are moving increasingly toward shared management of print materials with partner institutions. This program will offer perspectives on building shared collections housed at off-site storage facilities and will discuss models for retention policies and service agreements. Panelists will address how shared print holdings inform collection development decisions for acquiring, managing, and withdrawing items from on-site collections and will highlight strategies for future directions.

Innovative Collection Centered Programs: Beyond the Book Group
Sunday, 10:30a-12p

Libraries around the country put on fantastic adult programs for their patrons, but often these programs are driven by the performer or speaker, and connections made to the library’s collection are frequently an afterthought or nonexistent. During this session we’ll discuss content and implementation tips for collection-centered programs, including both traditional events like book discussion groups creative programming opportunities such as adult storytimes, summer reading programs, mock book awards, battle of the book competitions, genre studies, and seasonal previews of new books.

One Poem Enriching Lives Across the Globe: Samuel Ullman, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, and “Youth”
Sunday, 1:30-3:30

Judith Schaefer’s 59-minute film “So Long Are You Young: Samuel Ullman’s Poems and Passion” tells the remarkable story of the serendipitous international influence of one poem. The inspiring documentary highlights Ullman’s life (1840-1924), community humanitarian and civil rights work and personal courage as an immigrant Jew in Birmingham, Alabama, and shows how his philosophy influenced General Douglas MacArthur, postwar Japanese society, and world leaders like Robert Kennedy. Ullman biographer/historian Margaret Armbrester will facilitate audience discussion following a screening of the film.

16th Annual Reference Research Forum
Sunday, 1:30-3:30p

The Research Forum is one of the most popular programs at ALA Annual, where attendees learn about notable research projects in reference service areas such as user behavior, electronic service and reference effectiveness and assessment.

Programs: Monday, June 28

Clean, Green and Not So Mean: Can Business Help Save the World?
Monday, 8a-12p

Doing well by doing good is the business world’s new mantra. Concepts of corporate social responsibility, green business, and social entrepreneurship have become a focus of research and are inspiring the next generation of businesspeople. This program, featuring academics, librarians, and real-world practitioners, will reveal the trends that are transforming business from the boardroom to the grassroots level.

Labor Rights are Human Rights
Monday, 10:30a-12p

Labor rights are at the heart of the struggle for human rights. The freedom to associate, to organize and to have equal opportunities in the workplace are under attack around the world. This program will discuss labor rights, including the role of unions in promoting democracy and economic prosperity, and the attack on workers’ rights as part of an international phenomenon. The importance of unions to the salary and status of women will be a special focus of this program content

Taking the Library With You: VR Going Mobile
Monday, 10:30a-12p

Interested in finding budget friendly ways to expand your library’s virtual reference services to include mobile devices? Attendees will hear from, and be able to talk to innovative leaders in our profession, who will describe how their institutions are offering virtual reference services via mobile devices, including the tools they use, and their successes and challenges. Efforts of individual libraries and cooperatives are represented, as are SMS/texting and other mobile applications.