Public Library Funding & Technology Access Study 2011-2012

plftas logo

Libraries Connect Communities: Public Library Funding & Technology Access Study 2011-2012 assesses public access to computers, the Internet, and Internet-related services in U.S. public libraries, and the impact of library funding changes on connectivity, technology deployment, and sustainability. The study builds on the longest-running and largest study of Internet connectivity in public libraries begun in 1994 by John Carlo Bertot and Charles R. McClure.

The report provides information that can help library directors and library IT staff benchmark and advocate for technology resources in communities across the nation. The data are also of importance for policymakers at local, state, and federal levels, manufacturers of information and communication technologies, and the communities served by public libraries.

Navigate to the sections on the page using the links below.

Press Resources | Final 2011-2012 Report | More Survey Findings | Online Extras - Maps, State Summaries
   

Press Resources

Libraries Connect Communities 2011-2012 Press Kit
Additional Press Materials
Media Mentions

   

Final 2011-2012 Report

Libraries Connect Communities: Public Library Funding & Technology Access Study 2011-2012 report findings are being published as a digital supplement to American Libraries, the magazine of the American Library Association.

libraries connect communities 2011 coverAmerican Libraries Digital Supplement Summer 2012

Introduction from COSLA (. pdf)

Executive Summary (. pdf)

Library Funding Landscape (. pdf)

Library Technology Landscape (. pdf)

State Summaries (. pdf)

Reports from the Field (. pdf)

Acknowledgments (. pdf)

Appendix A: 2011-2012 Public Library Funding & Technology Access Survey Questionnaire

Appendix B: Interview Questions (. pdf)

Appendix C: Georgia public library interview participants (. pdf)

Appendix D: Idaho public library interview participants (. pdf)

 

Suggested study citation:
Hoffman, Judy, John Carlo Bertot, and Denise M. Davis. Libraries Connect Communities: Public Library Funding & Technology Access Study 2011-2012. Digital supplement of American Libraries magazine, June 2012. Available at http://viewer.zmags.com/publication/4673a369.

   

Survey Findings from the Information Policy & Access Center

For more information, please visit the Information Policy & Access Center at the University of Maryland.

Executive Summary and Methodology

Public Access to and Availability of Public Access Technology

Internet-Enabled Services Provided by the Library

Library E-government and Employment Services and Challenges

Technology Infrastructure: Replacement and Use

Social Media and Mobile Technologies in Public Libraries

Library Funding and Expenditures data

State-Level Data

   

Online Extras

Maps

  • National Services Map: This map provides a direct link to state-specific data and handouts, all available for download in PDF.
  • E-Books map: 76 percent of public libraries report offering free access to e-books to library patrons; view the map to see how your state stacks up.
  • Job resources map: 92 percent of public libraries provide access to job databases and other job opportunity resources; view the map to see how your state stacks up.
  • Training resources map: 90 percent of public libraries provide formal or informal technology training to library patrons; view the map to see how your state stacks up.
  • E-Government map: 97 percent of public libraries provide assistance to patrons applying for and access e-government services; view the map to see how your state stacks up.
  • Homework resources map: 82 percent of public libraries offer free homework resources to library patrons; view the map to see how your state stacks up.
  • Wi-fi availability map: 91 percent of public libraries now offer this service, and some states (and the District of Columbia) report universal WiFi access in their public libraries. View the map to see how your state stacks up.

State Tables

State Specific Data Summaries (.html)

 

For more information on the Public Library Funding and Technology Access Study or questions about the content on this page, please contact the Office for Research & Statistics.