Educational/Literacy Impact

children exposed to library outreach literacy training in preschool demonstrate more emergent literacy behaviors

The results of the present study indicate that children who have been exposed to a library outreach literacy training in preschool demonstrate a greater number of emergent literacy behaviors and pre-reading skills and read significantly more words correctly than children in a control group.

Public library programs offer wonderful opportunities for promoting school-readiness skills in children

Public library programs offer wonderful opportunities for promoting school-readiness skills in children and creating positive associations with books while showing parents how important these skills are and how to reinforce them at home.

children need high-quality language and literacy environments

A 1998 report, Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young Children , conducted by the National Research Council, concluded that “preschool children need high-quality language and literacy environments in their homes and in out-of-home settings. The public library is one such out-of-home setting suited for both parent and child in which these early language and literacy environments exist.

Libraries Are Places of Language Development

Libraries are an obvious destination for language development, due to their wealth of books and language-based programs for all ages.

public libraries offer positive literacy environments to children

Although public libraries do not have the same day-to-day influence on young children as their daycare centers or homes, they offer positive literacy environments and nurturing settings that prepare preschool children for more structured learning situations. Repeated attendance at such programs can aid healthy brain development of babies and young children that may in turn set a path for easier learning and school achievement later in life.

Libraries are an ideal place to take on deficiencies in school readiness

As libraries traditionally serve a wide spectrum of socioeconomic groups, they are in an ideal place to take on deficiencies in school readiness connected to low income and cultural differences.

By providing access to resources, libraries help children build early literacy skills

By providing access to both print and nonprint resources, libraries can help children build their early literacy skills while enabling them to become familiar with the tools they will most likely be using in school.

Parents are given books to read aloud to their children

In family programs at some public libraries, parents are given books to read aloud to their children during the actual sessions. Peer pressure and gentle librarian encouragement inspires them to share the book with their child, even if it is not something that they routinely do at home. However, the hope is that after doing it week after week at the public library, they will grow accustomed to book-sharing behavior and begin reading aloud to their child at home also. Some libraries allow the parents to keep the books, increasing the likelihood that they will continue reading aloud to their child at home.

Library Programs are Excellent Strategies for School Readiness

Library-based and –run lap-sitting programs, toddler times, preschool story times, adult literacy programs, access to educational video games, and general family programs are all excellent strategies for contributing to school readiness development.

Librarians help build the preliteracy skills underlying school readiness

As children’s librarians, in addition to providing resources, we are in a unique position to run programs for parents or caregivers and children that help build the preliteracy skills underlying school readiness.

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