Assn. for Library Service to Children

Parents are faced with ever-expanding media options to share with their children, and many children’s librarians are beginning to incorporate apps and eBooks for young children into their collections and programming to satisfy the growing need for reader's advisory in the app space ("Appvisory"). This webinar will explore why and how incorporating digital media into our collections and programming is now an essential part of children’s librarianship, and tips and tricks for translating traditional storytelling techniques into the digital realm.
FREE We are celebrating the 75th anniversary of the Caldecott Medal, but questions abound about how the award is chosen and what goes on behind those closed doors as the Caldecott Committee deliberates. How are members chosen for the Caldecott Committee? How does the Committee decide if a book really is a picture book? Why can't the Committee consider the text of a picture book…or can it? Here is an opportunity to get answers to your questions about one of the most significant awards in the field of children's literature.
Imagine that Joey Pigza came into your library.  Would he feel welcome?  How would you provide library service for him?  A child with a disability may need an individual service plan, but many books or articles provide generalizations and all-encompassing descriptions. This course will take another approach.
FREE TO ALSC MEMBERS. Together we'll take a closer look Caldecott Medal winning and honor books and explore various techniques for bringing books and children together through classroom and library programming.
FREE TO ALSC MEMBERS. Join this curated documentary with ALSC Past President and Caldecott expert Kathleen Horning as she shares stories about some of the winning books and illustrators while we watch and listen to a handful of films and audio interviews with the winning illustrators, created by TeachingBooks.net. Attendees will learn about these amazing illustrators and have a new context to teach, discuss, and enjoy these distinguished books.
The common core state standards bring three key shifts to English language arts/literacy curricula: regular practice with complex text and its academic language; reading, writing and speaking grounded in evidence from text, both literary and informational; building knowledge through content rich nonfiction. CCSS calls for 50% of reading in elementary and middle grades to be nonfiction. Librarians will be essential in the shift to common core as teachers look for the best content-rich, grade level-appropriate literature to support learning across the curriculum.
Are you looking for practical ways to integrate new technologies into your collections? Are you wondering how to balance your physical and digital holdings to maximize your offerings to your users, successfully engage them, and meet their needs? We will examine: - Collection development and management - How to successfully blend physical and digital collections - Digital devices: selection, management, and providing access - Staff Training and development All course participants will complete a course project focusing on a specific aspect of collection development of interest to them.
If you are like most children’s librarians, you are no doubt faced with the continual challenge of providing programs that are not only fun and appealing, but also highly informative and educational.  How do I fit all age levels?  What is age-appropriate?  How do I make old materials fresh again?  Where do I even begin?  This course will provide innovative ideas and suggestions on how to plan, promote, execute and evaluate your programs to work for you and your patrons.
Sensory Storytime incorporates theory and practices from Sensory Integration Occupational Therapy into a regular library preschool story hour that is fun for all kids and appropriate for young children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.  In this webinar, you’ll be introduced to some of the theory behind Sensory Storytime, some options and issues related to this type of programming, and the specifics of how one public library structures its Sensory Storytime program.   The webinar will equip you with the information and resources you need to be able to design or modify your ow
You want your users to have more confidence, be more independent, and be able to find the right book. By rearranging your children's collections you will be able to accomplish this and more. We can show you where to start, point out possible potholes and give you a map to the future. Join the library team from the Ethical Culture School which 2 years ago began to look at alternatives to Dewey and chose to implement the Metis Classification System to great success increaseing both circulation and patron satisfaction.
Our children are lagging behind in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM). Schools have begun to concentrate on providing better education in these areas and now libraries are being asked to provide the same. Learn how to provide educational programs using STEM without going to school to become a scientist. Children’s librarians and associates will learn to present and adapt programs for multiple ages.
With a “Fizz, Boom, READ!” theme for the 2014 Collaborative Summer Reading Program and a steady rise in school STEM programs, now is the pefect time to increase summer science activities in public libraries. Learn how one library has expanded a traditional Summer Reading Program to include multiple science components. Our easily adaptable model includes a Science Log to encourage home science activities, a Preschool Stories and Science series, and Tabletop Science in the Children’s Room. Adapt for your library using free downloadable resources provided in an online Summer Science Toolkit.
FREE TO ALSC MEMBERS. You may not have been able to read almost everything published in 2012—but this group did! Join members of the 2013 Notable Children’s Book Committee for this special webinar where they will book talk through part of this year’s Notables list. Covering twenty books in ninety minutes, you will discover new titles and gather information to help frame your own book discussions. Original Notable discussions took place at the 2013 ALA Midwinter Meeting, but now you can relive those moments through this one-time webinar taking place free to ALSC members.
For almost 75 years, the Caldecott Medal has been a sign of superior artistry and creativity in children’s picture books, given to only one book every year.  With so many children’s picture books published each year, how is the Caldecott Medal winning book selected?  What makes picture book illustration distinguished, and how has that definition changed over time?  Learn about the history of the award, how the award has transformed books over time, and how to look critically at picture book art.
FREE TO ALSC MEMBERS. This presentation focuses on the 10 principles for illustrating a great picture book. Following each principle there will be illustrations of images from children’s books to illuminate the principle. The artists featured include David Wiesner – winner of 3 gold Caldecott medals to Betsy Lewin the illustrator of the wildly successful “Click Clack Moo” series to a more recent Caldecott winner Brian Selznick creator of Hugo Cabret now an Oscar winning motion picture.
What do you do to play? Would you like to play all day? Play is a child's work! Research clearly shows play is key to early childhood development and lifelong success. Play is critical to a child's healthy development in all areas of school readiness, especially social emotional development and early literacy. How is play relevant to library services? Join us as we answer that question and identify ways to incorporate play in library programs and spaces to promote children's early childhood development and motivate caregivers to enjoy play with their children.
Many libraries are now offering preschool storytimes adapted to meet the needs of young children with autism, but fewer libraries have programs for elementary and middle school age children with this disability. With the autism incidence presently at 1 in 50 children (CDC, 2013) these children are in all communities.
FREE TO ALSC MEMBERS. Chip Donohue, co-author of the NAEYC/Fred Rogers Center Joint Position Statement on Technology Tools and Interactive Media in Early Childhood Programs, will share key messages and guidelines from the Statement and discuss implications for educators, parents, children’s librarians and other adults who care for and about young children. He will address both common concerns about children and technology and the potential benefits when adults select, use, integrate and evaluate technology in effective, appropriate and intentional ways that support development and learning.