Information Literacy

CEUs

This course is not currently being offered as part of this year’s course schedule; however, for groups who have 20 or more individuals interested in taking the course, we can offer it exclusively to your organization! In this YALSA e-course, participants will learn why teens need librarians to integrate technology into every aspect of service from homework help to readers' advisory to programming.

LiveeCourseAttendance Cert.
Is your information literacy course in need of an overhaul? Do you want to deliver exceptional learning experiences through your credit course? This online course will focus on information literacy curriculum development, including consideration of the Framework for Information Literacy and high impact practices with regards to content development and delivery.
Self-PacedeCourseAttendance Cert.
With more than 30 years' combined experience in teaching information literacy, Heidi Buchanan and Beth McDonough have designed an eCourse where you will experience effective learning activities yourself and be ready to prepare your own.
Diane McNutt and Jane Light, Silicon Valley Reads, will describe this library’s "one book-one community" program in Santa Clara (Calif.) County. Its 2012 program, "Muslim and American -Two Perspectives," featured two books written by American Muslims, ("The Muslim Next Door" by Sumbul Ali-Karamali and "The Butterfly Mosque" by G. Willow Wilson). More than 100 programs were presented, including author readings, panel discussions, films, an open house evening at a local mosque and an art exhibit.
LiveWebinar
In this workshop, information literacy expert Donald Barclay uses a historical context to argue that while some of what we are seeing is new and unique to the Digital Age, much of it has been around for centuries. This workshop focuses on the challenges of developing information literate students in an era marked by massive amounts of information, fake news, propaganda, and mistrust of authority.
LiveWebinar
Explore strategies and techniques for teaching people the literacy skills they need to combat fake news. First, participants will examine factors, both historic and new, that contribute to the proliferation of fake news. Participants will also explore connections between information and news literacy skills. Participants will then discover ways to apply more traditional research and information literacy skills, such as source evaluation skills, to addressing fake news, and will gain ideas for new, interactive ways to help students handle fake news and misinformation.
Self-PacedeCourseAttendance Cert.
Inquiry and literacy – are they one and the same or complementary processes? Participants explore different inquiry models and how literacy can be instilled throughout.
Self-PacedeCourseAttendance Cert.
In this eCourse, you’ll look at instruction sessions through the lens of critical information literacy, discussing the inherent biases and systemic oppression in how information is disseminated and processed.
On-DemandWebinarFree!
To get you prepared for financial literacy programs and events at your library, PLA partners with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s (SEC) Office of Investor Education and Advocacy (OIEA) for this special webinar presentation.
On-DemandWebinarFree!
Talk of fake news and the need for critical thinking skills have been in heavy rotation in the media in recent months, with new calls for the public to acquire appropriate research and evaluation skills and become more information savvy. However, none of this is new for librarians and information professionals, particularly for those who teach information literacy classes! With this renewed interest, librarians have brand new opportunities to impart these skills to patrons.

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