Publications

A discussion guide for Coretta Scott King Award-winning books

CHICAGO — Spotlighting titles appropriate for grades K-12, “Coretta Scott King Award Books Discussion Guide: Pathways to Democracy,” published by ALA Editions, builds on the rich legacy of the Coretta Scott King award-winning books to offer an important educational resource for teachers, librarians, parents and other caregivers. This guide, written by Adelaide Poniatowski Phelps and Carole J.

A guide to picture books from around the world

CHICAGO — Picture books can be portals to far-flung corners of the globe, and the books in “Global Voices: Picture Books from Around the World,” published by ALA Editions, will help children’s imaginations soar. Susan Stan identifies quality literature for children ages 3 to 8 that conveys a true sense of life outside America’s borders, making this book a valuable resource for librarians and educators to foster cross-cultural education.

Case studies highlight real-world innovations in university libraries

CHICAGO — What is the future of the academic library, and how are institutions coping with the challenges that are already being imposed by its changing functions and purpose? Using the results of a year-long study, “The New University Library: Four Case Studies,” published by ALA Editions, profiles four academic libraries that are transforming themselves with extraordinary ingenuity and diligence.

Exploring environmental science with children and teens

CHICAGO — In the classroom, science often takes a back seat to the study of math and English. That gives public and school libraries as well as museums the opportunity to jump in as venues for informal education, sharing the wonders of science with children and their caregivers. In “Exploring Environmental Science with Children and Teens,” published by ALA Editions, Eileen G.

Bugs, bogs, bats and books

CHICAGO — Reading a book before or after a trip to the zoo, a nighttime look at the stars or a walk in the forest can connect children to nature while inspiring discussion and questions.  In “Bugs, Bogs, Bats, and Books: Sharing Nature with Children through Reading,” teacher and librarian Kathleen T.

The ALA guide to researching modern China

CHICAGO — As China has evolved into an economic superpower, interest in its culture and current place in the world has skyrocketed; China Studies are now taught in almost every college or university in the U.S., as well as in many junior high and high schools. Covering modern China, not just Chinese culture from an historical perspective, “The ALA Guide to Researching Modern China,” published by ALA Editions, fills a sizeable gap in the literature.

Using metaliteracy to empower learners

CHICAGO — Today’s learners communicate, create and share information using a range of information technologies such as social media, blogs, microblogs, wikis, mobile devices and apps, virtual worlds and MOOCs. In “Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners,” published by ALA Neal-Schuman, respected information literacy experts Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E.

Sheehan appointed RBM editor

CHICAGO The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) has named Jennifer K. Sheehan as the next editor of RBM: A Journal of Rare Books, Manuscripts, and Cultural Heritage (RBM). Sheehan is currently a member of the RBM editorial board and brings in-depth knowledge of the world of rare books and manuscripts to the bi-annual publication. She will serve as editor-designate starting immediately with her term as editor beginning in July 2014.

A guide to biographies to read aloud with kids

CHICAGO — The right biography can be as enthralling as any work of fiction, blending facts with gripping storytelling. “Biographies to Read Aloud with Kids: From Alvin Ailey to Zishe the Strongman” is a guide to the best ones for adults to read to kids. Noted children's book authority Rob Reid offers a choice selection of exemplary biographies that will entertain and educate children about a variety of fascinating people and their places in history.

A LITA guide to responsive Web design

CHICAGO — Tablets, desktops, smartphones, laptops, minis: we live in a world of screens, all of different sizes. Library websites need to work on all of them, but maintaining separate sites or content management systems is resource intensive and still unlikely to address all the variations. By using responsive Web design, libraries can build one site for all devices—now and in the future.

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