Intellectual Freedom

Seeing the Big Picture on Student Data Privacy at 2016 ALA Annual Conference

 
ORLANDO, Fla.—Every day, technology is making it possible to collect and analyze more data regarding students’ performance and behavior, including their use of library resources. The use of big data in the educational environment, however, raises thorny questions and deep concerns about individual privacy and data security.
 
These and other related issues will be the focus of a timely June 27 session at the American Library Association’s (ALA) upcoming 2016 Annual Conference in Orlando, Florida.

New library privacy guidelines aim to strengthen reader privacy protections for K – 12 students

CHICAGO — On May 2, 2016, the American Library Association's Intellectual Freedom Committee approved a new document, "Library Privacy Guidelines for Students in K-12 Schools."  The document, which surveys the state of students' privacy in K-12 schools, provides guidance for school libraries and educational institutions seeking to protect students' privacy, both while online and while reading or engaging in research.

"The Library Juice Press Handbook of Intellectual Freedom" named 2016 Eli M. Oboler Award winner

The Intellectual Freedom Round Table has announced the winner of the 2016 Eli M. Oboler Memorial Award, which recognizes the best published work in the area of intellectual freedom.  The 2016 award goes to The Library Juice Press Handbook of Intellectual Freedom, edited by Mark Alfino and Laura Koltutsky.  The publisher is the Library Juice Press.

Demand for Apple encryption tool threatens library users’ privacy

CHICAGO – Libraries have a direct and immediate stake in the outcome of the Apple case, as patrons have 24/7 access to library materials and resources via their smart phones, tablets and mobile devices. Sari Feldman, president of the American Library Association (ALA) released the following statement in response to a federal court order that requires Apple to develop a new tool to eliminate specific security protections the company built into its phone software, in order to assist the Federal Bureau of Investigation in unlocking encrypted messages.