Office for Intellectual Freedom

Oak Park students learn to distinguish fact from opinion in News Know-how news literacy project

CHICAGO — High school students, using the Oak Park (Ill.) Public Library as their “newsroom,” gained valuable lessons in distinguishing fact from opinion, as they examined news coverage of a wide range of important issues through the News Know-how news literacy project.

Students post News Know-how projects that helped them distinguish between fact and opinion in 2012 presidential campaign

CHICAGO — First-year projects completed in the News Know-how initiative that helped young people distinguish between fact and opinion in news accounts in print and online during the 2012 presidential election have been posted at www.newsknowhow.org/projects.

Public libraries invited to seek $50,000 in training, support to help teens learn news literacy skills

CHICAGO — Public libraries and library consortia are invited to apply for more than $50,000 in training and support, in the News Know-how initiative that helps  students, grades 10-12, learn skills that will help them  distinguish fact from opinion , check news and information sources and distinguish between propaganda and news.

Freedom to Read Foundation announces nominating committee for 2013 election

CHICAGO — The Freedom to Read Foundation (FTRF) has announced the nominating committee for its April 2013 election.  Committee members are: Judith Platt, Washington, D.C.  (chair);  Jonathan Bloom, New York;  and Julius C. Jefferson, Jr., Washington, D.C.

Bill Moyers calls out book censors for Banned Books Week

CHICAGO — Award-winning broadcast journalist Bill Moyers discusses book banning and the harms of censorship in a new video essay to commemorate the 30th anniversary of Banned Books Week. Banned Books Week is an annual event sponsored by the American Library Association (ALA) that recognizes the importance of the freedom to read. Both Bill and Judith Davidson Moyers were named Honorary Co-Chairs of this year’s celebration Sept. 30 – Oct. 6.

Bill & Judith Moyers are Honorary Chairs of Banned Books Week

Bill Moyers speaks out against censorship in new 30th anniversary video essay 

CHICAGO — Award-winning broadcast journalists Bill Moyers and Judith Davidson Moyers have been named Honorary Co-Chairs for the 30th anniversary of Banned Books Week (Sept. 30 – Oct. 6), American Library Association’s (ALA) annual celebration of our freedom to read.

Celebrate the power of literature and read a banned book

Banned Books Week is Sept. 30 – Oct. 6

CHICAGO – What would you do if you went to the library to check out a book, only to find it wasn’t there? Not because it was already checked out, but because someone else didn’t agree with its content and had it removed. According to the American Library Association’s (ALA) Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF), there were 326 reported attempts to remove materials from libraries in 2011, making this situation all too familiar in some communities across the U.S.

OIF to sponsor Fahrenheit 451 film, Wikileaks documentary at ALA Annual

CHICAGO — The American Library Association Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF) is sponsoring two films as part of the "Now Showing @ ALA" film program at the 2012 ALA Annual Conference in Anaheim, Calif. The films are free to all registered attendees of the conference.

Freedom to Read Foundation announces eight Judith Krug Fund grants for Banned Books Week events

CHICAGO —The Freedom to Read Foundation (FTRF), via its Judith F. Krug Memorial Fund, has announced eight $1,000 grants to libraries, schools and other organizations in support of Banned Books Week events.  Banned Books Week, which will take place Sept. 30­–Oct. 6, 2012, celebrates the freedom to access information, while drawing attention to the harms of censorship.

Booth receives FTRF Gordon M. Conable Conference Scholarship

CHICAGO — The Freedom to Read Foundation (FTRF) has named Steven Booth, an archivist with the Presidential Materials Division at the National Archives and Records Administration,  the fifth recipient of the Gordon M.

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