Office for Information Technology Policy

ALA seeks feedback on draft national policy agenda for libraries

Libraries are in a revolution fueled by rapid advances in technology, and thus the roles, capabilities, and expectations of libraries are changing rapidly. National public policy for libraries must reflect these changes. Today the American Library Association (ALA) Office for Information Technology Policy (OITP) released a discussion draft policy agenda (pdf) for libraries to guide a proactive policy shift.

Experts to explore library policies and 3D printing at 2015 ALA Midwinter Meeting

CHICAGO—Technological developments in 3D printing are empowering people to learn new skills, launch business ventures and solve complex health problems. As this cutting-edge technology becomes more common in libraries, what do librarians need to know? Join a panel of information professionals for the session “Library 3D Printing—Unlocking the Opportunities, Understanding the Challenges” which takes place during the 2015 American Library Association’s (ALA) Midwinter Meeting in Chicago. The session will be held from 10:30–11:30 a.m.

Experts to discuss national library public policy at 2015 ALA Midwinter Meeting

CHICAGO—Library and policy leaders will discuss Policy Revolution!, an initiative to advance national policy for libraries, during the 2015 American Library Association’s (ALA) Midwinter Meeting in Chicago. The session, titled “What is a Policy Revolution! Anyway?,” takes place from 1:00 to 2:30 p.m. on Sunday, February 1, 2015.

Panel of ebook policy experts to address 2015 ALA Midwinter Meeting

CHICAGO—A leading panel of library and publishing experts will provide an update on the library ebook lending market and discuss the best ways for libraries to bring together authors and readers in the digital age at the 2015 American Library Association’s (ALA) Midwinter Meeting in Chicago. The session “ALA DCWG: Libraries and Ebooks—Where Do We Go from Here?” takes place from 10:30–11:30 a.m. on Sunday, February 1, 2015.

Rapid growth in 3D printer use raises public policy issues for libraries and society

WASHINGTON, D.C.— Public policy issues surrounding 3D printers are now coming to the fore as the technology becomes more widely available in America’s libraries and homes. To ensure people are able to use 3D printers responsibly and effectively, librarians must now work towards developing policies in copyright, trademark, privacy, product liability and more. Established, reasonable practices for 3D printing will enable this technology to best serve our communities and inform the laws, regulations and judicial decisions to come.

ALA and ACRL respond to Eleventh Circuit Court’s encouraging “fair use” decision in Georgia State University case

WASHINGTON, D.C.—On Friday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit handed down an important decision in Cambridge University Press et al. v. Carl V. Patton et al. concerning the permissible "fair use" of copyrighted works in electronic reserves for academic courses. Although publishers sought to bar the uncompensated excerpting of copyrighted material for "e-reserves," the court rejected all such arguments and provided new guidance in the Eleventh Circuit for how "fair use" determinations by educators and librarians should best be made.