Office for Information Technology Policy

2014 Patterson copyright award winner announced

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Georgia Harper is the 2014 recipient of the L. Ray Patterson Copyright Award: In Support of Users’ Rights. Harper is the Scholarly Communications Advisor for the University of Texas at Austin Libraries, where she focuses on issues of digital access and previously, Senior Attorney and manager of the Intellectual Property Section of the Office of General Counsel for the University of Texas System.

ALA President applauds creation of 'Right to E-read' campaign

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Today, the European Bureau of Library, Information and Documentation Associations (EBLIDA) launched the “Right to E-read” campaign, a new initiative that enables libraries to advocate for library e-books. In response, Barbara Stripling, president of the American Library Association (ALA), today congratulated EBLIDA for developing the ebook advocacy campaign:

ALA to participate in IMLS hearing on libraries and broadband

WASHINGTON, D.C.—On Thursday, April 17, 2014, from 9:30–11:30 a.m., leaders from the American Library Association (ALA) will participate in “Libraries and Broadband: Urgency and Impact,” a public hearing hosted by the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS) that will explore the need for high-speed broadband in American libraries.

ALA calls for FCC to use $2 billion for e-rate demonstration projects, funding internal connections

Today the American Library Association (ALA) called on (PDF) the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to deploy newly identified E-rate program funding to boost library broadband access and alleviate historic shortfalls in funding for internal connections.

American Library Association, Internet Archive support civil liberties in amicus brief

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Today, the American Library Association and the Internet Archive filed a “friend of the court” (PDF) brief in David Leon Riley v. State of California and United States v. Brima Wurie, two Supreme Court cases examining the constitutionality of cell phone searches after police arrests. In the amicus brief, both nonprofit organizations argue that warrantless cell phone searches violate privacy principles protected by the Fourth Amendment.

ALA joins SXSW technology policy discussions

CHICAGO — The American Library Association (ALA) will join the technology policy conversations in play at the South by Southwest EDU and Interactive conferences in Austin starting this week. Privacy and the “internet of things” will be among the topics on the agenda for the ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF) and Office for Information Technology Policy (OITP). ALA also will join members and sister library organizations at the joint “Innovative Booth for Libraries” March 7-11, 2014.

Four local libraries honored for offering cutting-edge services

Today, the American Library Association (ALA) recognized four libraries for offering cutting-edge technologies in library services, honoring programs in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; Bridgewater, New Jersey; Raleigh, North Carolina; and University Park, Pennsylvania.

America’s libraries are rung on ladder of opportunity

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Today, Barbara Stripling, president of the American Library Association (ALA), released the following statement regarding President Barack Obama’s recent State of the Union address:

“President Obama’s State of the Union speech focused on many themes that form the basis of library services in communities across the country. These include:

Try out Google Glass at the 2014 ALA Midwinter Meeting

PHILADELPHIA—Come learn about Google Glass, a new device from Google that's worn like a pair of glasses, made of a lightweight frame and tiny display that rests just above your eyes. The American Library Association (ALA) will host Google Glass demonstrations at the 2014 ALA Midwinter Meeting in Philadelphia January 25th and 26th in the Grand Hall of the Pennsylvania Convention Center. Wilson L.

Google leadership to detail book search lawsuit at 2014 ALA Midwinter Meeting

PHILADELPHIA—Librarians applauded last November when the U.S. District Court protected Google’s searchable book database by calling Google Book Search a fair use under the copyright law. But is the case over, given that the Authors Guild has already filed an appeal? What impact will the Google Book Search saga have on copyright reform?

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