New survey results point to what’s working in state standards implementation

For Immediate Release
Tue, 10/13/2015

Contact:

Jennifer Habley

Manager, Web Communications

American Association of School Librarians (AASL)

312-280-4383

jhabley@ala.org

CHICAGO — According to findings in Building Literacy Capacity: The Conditions for Effective Standards Implementation, a new report out from the National Center for Literacy Education (NCLE), the secret to implementing state standards and creating change in schools is building the shared capacity of educators.

The report details findings from a national survey of K–12 public educators representing all grade levels and subject areas. The findings show a clear correlation between schools where state standards implementation is reportedly going well and schools that invest in educator professional development, rely on educator expertise and build educator ownership of change.

Such schools demonstrate a “capacity-building” approach. As the report’s lead researcher, Dr. Catherine Awsumb Nelson, explains, “Standards implementation is treated as an organizational learning process, not a compliance exercise. Every element of their implementation strategy focuses on finding ways for educators to work together to build, share, and refine their expertise.”

NCLE will host a live webinar to share key findings at 2:30 p.m. Eastern on Oct. 13. American Association of School Librarians (AASL) Executive Director Sylvia Knight Norton will participate as a panelist and offer commentary. Register to attend bit.ly/2015NCLEReport-Register.

The full report can be found after 2:30 p.m. Eastern on Oct. 13, at bit.ly/BuildingLiteracyCapacity. Five additional reports that take a closer look at how capacity-driven schools approach implementation will come out individually over the next several months.

The National Center for Literacy Education is a coalition of 25 professional education associations, policy organizations, and foundations united to support schools in elevating literacy learning. More information can be found at www.literacyinlearningexchange.org.

The American Association of School Librarians, www.aasl.org, a division of the American Library Association (ALA), empowers leaders to transform teaching and learning.