ACRL seeks feedback on revised draft Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education

For Immediate Release
Thu, 06/19/2014

Contact:

Kara Malenfant
Senior Strategist for Special Initiatives
Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL)
kmalenfant@ala.org

CHICAGO — The Association of College and Research Libraries’ (ACRL) Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Task Force seeks feedback on the revised draft of the association’s Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education.

The Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education, adopted by ACRL in 2000, has become an essential document related to the emergence of information literacy as a recognized learning outcome at many institutions of higher education. These, like all ACRL standards, are reviewed cyclically. In June 2012, the ACRL Board of Directors approved a unanimous recommendation that they be significantly revised. A task force charged with creating the Framework has been working since March 2013 and shared a first draft this spring.

“The revision of the ACRL information literacy standards is vital in order for our libraries and librarians to think about, understand, and use new methods of incorporating information fluency in our curricula. I’m pleased with the work of the task force thus far and look forward to the completion – and implementation – of the new Framework,” said ACRL President Trevor A. Dawes of Washington University in St. Louis.

Since the publication of the first standards, the information environment has evolved into a fragmented, complex information ecosystem that demands greater sense-making and metacognition from the student.

“The Framework offers possibilities for thinking about information literacy in a more holistic way and for designing more coherent programs based on genuine collaboration,” said ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Task Force Co-Chair Craig Gibson of Ohio State University Libraries.

The new Framework seeks to address the interconnected nature of the abilities, practices and dispositions of the student, moving away from the hierarchical and formulaic approach of the current standards.

“Preliminary conversations about the Framework with both librarians and faculty at a number of institutions suggest increasing excitement about and engagement with the potential it provides,” said Trudi E. Jacobson, co-chair of the ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Task Force and head of the Information Literacy Department at the University at Albany, SUNY University Libraries.

The revised draft Framework, along with questions to guide the review and feedback process, is now available on the task force website. An in-person hearing is scheduled for 10:30 am - 11:30 am on Saturday, June 28, at the 2014 ALA Annual Conference in Las Vegas. Two additional online hearings will take place on Monday, July 7, and Friday, July 11, 2014. Sign-up for the July online hearings is available on the task force website.

Please provide feedback on the revised draft by 5:00 pm Central on Tuesday, July 15, 2014, via an online form.

Contact ACRL Senior Strategist for Special Initiatives Kara Malenfant with questions.

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The Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) is the higher education association for librarians. Representing more than 11,500 academic and research librarians and interested individuals, ACRL (a division of the American Library Association) is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to help academic and research librarians learn, innovate and lead within the academic community. Founded in 1940, ACRL is committed to advancing learning and transforming scholarship. ACRL is on the Web at www.acrl.org/, Facebook at www.facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.