ALSC kicks off registration for summer 2013 online courses

For Immediate Release
Fri, 06/07/2013

Contact:

Dan Rude
Marketing Specialist, Membership
Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC)
drude@ala.org

CHICAGO — The Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) opened registration for summer 2013 ALSC online courses. Registration is open for all courses. Classes begin Monday, July 15, 2013.

Participants in online courses consistently respond that they would be very likely to register for another course offered by ALSC. ALSC online courses are designed to fit the needs of working professionals. Courses are taught by experienced librarians and academics. For more information, please visit: http://www.ala.org/alsced

The Caldecott Medal: Understanding Distinguished Art in Picture Books (six weeks) For almost 75 years, the Caldecott Medal has been a sign of superior artistry and creativity in children’s picture books, given to only one book every year. With so many children’s picture books published each year, how is the Caldecott Medal winning book selected? What makes picture book illustration distinguished, and how has that definition changed over time? Learn about the history of the award, how the award has transformed books over time, and how to look critically at picture book art. Taught by Kathleen T. Horning, director, Cooperative Children's Book Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Children with Disabilities in the Library (six weeks, three CEUs). Imagine that Joey Pigza came into your library. Would he feel welcome? How would you provide library service for him? A child with a disability may need an individual service plan. But many books or articles provide generalizations and all-encompassing descriptions. This course will take another approach. By reading juvenile novels about children with disabilities, we will discover their individual needs. First, we will examine how schools handle students with disabilities. Then we will explore ways that the library might be able to assist each child. We will look at inclusive programming, assistive technologies, staff attitudes and legal considerations. This course is not intended to be a comprehensive course. Rather, we will collaboratively develop strategies for determining needs and identify resources that can be consulted when an actual child requires our help. Taught by Katherine (Kate) Todd, adjunct Instructor, Manhattanville College.

Getting to the Core: Librarians and Common Core State Standards (six weeks). The common core state standards (CCSS) bring three key shifts to English language arts/literacy (ELA) curricula: regular practice with complex text and its academic language; reading, writing and speaking grounded in evidence from text, both literary and informational; building knowledge through content rich nonfiction. CCSS calls for 50 percent of reading in elementary and middle grades to be nonfiction. Librarians will be essential in the shift to common core as teachers look for the best content-rich, grade level-appropriate literature to support learning across the curriculum. ELA and other content-area teachers will especially need help from librarians finding appropriate resources and a wider selection of materials. This course will help prepare participants to meet those needs of teachers in the elementary and middle grades. Taught by Edward Sullivan, librarian, writer and educator.

Integrating New Technologies into Your Collections (four weeks) Are you looking for practical ways to integrate new technologies into your collections? Are you wondering how to balance your physical and digital holdings to maximize your offerings to your users, successfully engage them and meet their needs? We will examine: - Collection development and management - How to successfully blend physical and digital collections - Digital devices: selection, management and providing access - Staff Training and development. All course participants will complete a course project focusing on a specific aspect of collection development of interest to them. Course participants will leave this course with a wealth of practical knowledge and will be able to confidently, easily and successfully integrate a wide variety of new technologies and digital tools into their collections. Taught by Bonnie Roalsen, head of children's services, Dover Town (Mass.) Public Library.

Out of this World Youth Programming (six weeks, 1.8 CEUs) If you are like most children’s librarians, you are no doubt faced with the continual challenge of providing programs that are not only fun and appealing, but also highly informative and educational. How do I fit all age levels? What is age-appropriate? How do I make old materials fresh again? Where do I even begin? This course will provide innovative ideas and suggestions on how to plan, promote, execute and evaluate your programs to work for you and your patrons. Taught by Angela Young, MSLS, youth services librarian, Lorain Public Library System.

Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Programs Made Easy (four weeks, 1.2 CEUs) Our children are lagging behind in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM). Schools have begun to concentrate on providing better education in these areas and now libraries are being asked to provide the same. Learn how to provide educational programs using STEM without going to school to become a scientist. Children’s librarians and associates will learn to present and adapt programs for multiple ages. Taught by Angela Young, youth services librarian, Lorain Public Library System.

Detailed descriptions and registration information is available on the ALSC website at www.ala.org/alsced. Fees are $115 for personal ALSC members; $165 for personal ALA members; and $185 for non-members. Questions? Please contact ALSC Program Officer Jenny Najduch at jnajduch@ala.org or 1 (800) 545-2433 ext. 4026.

Comments

Does anyone know of a workshop or class that a public librarian can take that will enable her/him to teach children in 1st and 2nd grade the very basics of information literacy? Many of the elementary schools in my service area no longer have librarians and there is a great need for this type of workshop for children.