Professional development and school library collections research discussed in new SLR articles

For Immediate Release
Tue, 12/11/2012

Contact:

Jennifer R Habley
Manager, Web Communications
American Association of School Librarians (AASL)
800-545-2433 ext.4383
jhabley@ala.org

CHICAGO — Two new research articles covering the topics of professional development offerings available to school librarians at state-level conferences and the  instructional role of the school library collection are now available online as part of the American Association of School Librarian’s (AASL) peer-reviewed online journal, School Library Research.

For their article “State Library Conferences as Professional Development Venues: Unbalanced Support for the AASL-Defined Roles of the School Librarian,” Judi Moreillon, Maria Cahill, and Rebecca McKee conducted a content-analysis study to investigate the professional development offerings available to school librarians at state-level conferences. Their goal was to determine to what degree the offered sessions promoted the five roles for school librarians as identified in Empowering Learners: Guidelines for School Library Programs, AASL’s program guidelines. The article discusses their methods and the results of their study, which show unbalanced conference-sponsored professional development in terms of the Empowering Learners defined roles for school librarians.

To explore perceptions held by teachers about the instructional role of the school library collection, Karla Collins and Carol Doll conducted two surveys and a set of interviews to document the perceptions of teachers at one high school. In their article, “Resource Provisions of a High School Library Collection,” Collins and Doll discuss their results, which showed that teachers used and saw students use more digital than print materials; downplayed the value of textbooks; and spent a large amount of time finding quality resources for instruction, often without the inclusion of library resources or assistance of librarians.

“New studies just published in Volume 15 of School Library Research address topics that have particular and timely relevance to building-level school librarians,” said Jean Donham, editorial board chair. “The editorial board is happy to see research that informs our practice so directly, whether the topic is professional development or school library program collections.”

School Library Research (ISSN: 2165-1019) is the successor to School Library Media Research (ISSN: 1523-4320) and School Library Media Quarterly Online. The journal is peer-reviewed, indexed by H. W. Wilson's Library Literature and by the ERIC Clearinghouse on Information & Technology, and continues to welcome manuscripts that focus on high quality original research concerning the management, implementation and evaluation of school library programs.

The American Association of School Librarians, www.aasl.org, a division of the American Library Association (ALA), promotes the improvement and extension of library services in elementary and secondary schools as a means of strengthening the total education program. Its mission is to advocate excellence, facilitate change and develop leaders in the school library field.