FTRF announces competition for 2012 Banned Books Week grants

For Immediate Release
Tue, 03/27/2012

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CHICAGO — Applications are now open for the 2012 Judith Krug Fund Banned Books Week event grants, sponsored by the Freedom to Read Foundation (FTRF).  Grants in the amounts of $2,500 and $1,000 grants will be given to organizations in support of “Read-Outs” or other activities that celebrate Banned Books Week (Sept. 30 – Oct. 6, 2012).

Applications for the grants will be accepted through May 11, 2012, and the announcements will be made in June.

The Freedom to Read Foundation - the First Amendment legal defense affiliate of the American Library Association - became an official sponsor of Banned Books Week this year.  2012 marks the 30th anniversary of Banned Books Week.

This is the third year Krug Fund grants will be given.  Seven organizations received grants in 2010, and six in 2011.  A compilation video of 2011 recipients can be found at http://youtu.be/Fk-0bDEcXgQ

Organizations are required to submit an event description, timeline and budget with their application; they are also required to agree to provide a written report, photos and video from their event(s) to FTRF following Banned Books Week. 

For more information on Banned Books Week, challenges to materials in libraries and schools and resources for combating censorship, visit www.ala.org/bbooks.  A compendium of thousands of books that have been banned and challenged can be found in the 2010 "Banned Books Resource Guide," available through the ALA Store:  www.alastore.ala.org.  You also can purchase Banned Books Week posters, buttons, bookmarks, t-shirts, bracelets and tote bags there.

Contact Jonathan Kelley at jokelley@ala.org with questions, or call (800) 545-2433 (800) 545-2433, ext. 4226.

Judith F. Krug, FTRF’s first executive director, was passionate about Banned Books Week and defending the freedom to read.  After her death, the Judith F. Krug Memorial Fund was established to guarantee that the message of Banned Books Week would continue to spread and grow around the United States