ALA announces applications for the Great Stories CLUB , (Connecting Libraries, Underserved teens and Books), sponsored by supported by a grant from Oprah's Angel Network

Contact: Lainie Castle
Public Programs Office
312-280-5055
lcastle@ala.org
For Immediate Release
February 6, 2006

ALA announces applications for the Great Stories CLUB, supported by a grant from Oprah's Angel Network

CHICAGO – The Great Stories CLUB (Connecting Libraries, Underserved teens and Books) is a book club grant program organized by the American Library Association Public Programs Office (PPO) and Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) to provide young adults with the opportunity to discuss books relevant to the challenges in their lives. Oprah's Angel Network is providing a grant to support the program.

All types of libraries (public, school, academic and special), in partnership with facilities serving troubled teens (such as juvenile detention centers or alternative high schools) in the United States and its territories are eligible to apply. Selected libraries will present three-part book club discussions featuring three theme-related books chosen by YALSA for teen audiences. Applications will be accepted online at www.ala.org/greatstories from January 25 through February 20, 2006.

Up to 200 libraries will be selected to receive 10 sets of the three books to provide to members of the book club, along with online resources to plan and implement the program. YALSA's Outreach to Young Adults with Special Needs Committee developed the book selections, theme and program support materials. The theme for the Great Stories CLUB will be teens facing challenges, and the following titles will be included:

  • “The First Part Last” by Angela Johnson
  • “Born Blue” by Han Nolan
  • “Stuck in Neutral” by Terry Trueman

For further details, including guidelines, application instructions, and the online application, visit www.ala.org/greatstories. With questions, contact publicprograms@ala.org.

YALSA is the world leader in evaluating and selecting reading, listening and viewing for teens through its three literary awards, seven selected lists and other publications. For more information about YALSA, go to www.ala.org/yalsa.

Established in 1992, the ALA Public Programs Office has a strong track record of developing library programming initiatives, including the acclaimed reading and discussion series “Let's Talk About It!,” film discussion programs on humanities themes, traveling exhibitions, LIVE! @ your library®, and other programs. It has recently established the Cultural Communities Fund, an endowment fund created to help all types of libraries across the country bring communities together through cultural programming ( www.ala.org/ccf). More than 8,000 libraries and at least 10 million individuals have participated in library programming initiatives supported by the Public Programs Office. For more information, go to www.ala.org/publicprograms.