New eCourse/e-book bundle: Learner-Centered Pedagogy for Library Instruction

For Immediate Release
Thu, 09/14/2017

Contact:

Colton Ursiny

Administrative Assistant

ALA Publishing

cursiny@ala.org

Chicago—ALA Publishing eLearning Solutions announces a new facilitated eCourse/e-book bundle, Learner-Centered Pedagogy for Library Instruction. Dani Brecher Cook and Kevin Michael Klipfel will serve as the instructors for a 6-week facilitated eCourse starting on Monday, November 13, 2017.

Estimated Hours of Learning: 36
Certificate of Completion available upon request

How can we relate our information literacy sessions to our learners? By placing them at the center of our instruction and finding ways to connect information with their interests and experiences.

This eCourse provides you with reference and instruction practices that can lead to enhanced outcomes for your learners. Library instruction experts Dani Brecher Cook and Kevin Michael Klipfel guide you through exercises that concretely apply theory to relatable library contexts. Using Learner-Centered Pedagogy: Principles and Practice as the core text, you’ll gain strategies to transform your personal librarianship practice into a humanistic, learner-centered model. Throughout the eCourse, you’ll create a personal teaching philosophy statement and develop an activity to teach a learning outcome using learner-centered principles.

You’ll walk away from this eCourse feeling more confident in your instructional strategies and your ability to engage with learner-centered pedagogy.

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this course, you will be able to

  • Articulate an individually developed learner-centered teaching philosophy
  • Plan and deliver a learner-centered activity for an information literacy-related outcome
  • Incorporate evidence-based practices related to autonomy, empathy, relationship rapport, and learners’ intrinsic motivation into your own reference and instructional contexts

eCourse outline

Week 1: Introduction to Learner-Centered Pedagogy

  • How is learner-centered pedagogy defined and what are its theoretical and empirical bases?
  • How do we know when learning has occurred?
  • How can teacher-librarians (re)define information literacy in a learner-centered environment?

Week 2:  Facilitating Curiosity

  • How can library instructors tap into learners’ intrinsic motivation and desire for authentic self-expression to make information literacy really matter to learners?
  • Why do autonomy-supportive rather than controlling learning environments so successfully motivate learning?
  • What are some evidence-based practices librarians can employ to support learners’ sense of autonomy and authenticity in the information literacy context?

Week 3: The Cognitive Science of Learning

  • What are some of the cognitive challenges that students face when learning information literacy skills?
  • How can an understanding of the cognitive science of learning improve librarians instructional design practices in and out of the classroom?
  • What are some evidence-based practical strategies librarians can take from the cognitive science of learning to better organize their instruction to help make information literacy learning stick?

Week 4: Relationships: The Heart of Learner-Centered Pedagogy

  • Why do students seem to learn best with instructors that they feel connected to?
  • How have librarians historically approached the importance of the librarian-student relationship for facilitating information literacy learning?
  • What are some evidence-based practices librarians can use to establish genuine connections and relationship rapport with learners in the information literacy context?

Week 5: Mindsets toward Learning

  • How does students’ attitudes toward the role intelligence plays in learning impact their motivation to learn?
  • How can we facilitate a process-oriented approach to research?
  • What best practices can librarians adopt from the mindset literature to help students who are experiencing roadblocks in their research?

Week 6: The Learner-Centered Technologist

  • What is technology and what role does it play in learner-centered information literacy instruction?
  • What practical test can librarians use to assess whether the use of a particular technology is learner-centered?
  • What evidence based strategies for using technology are recommended by the learner-centered pedagogy literature?

About the Instructors

Kevin Michael Klipfel is the Instructional Design and Assessment Librarian at the University of Southern California Libraries. He received his master’s degree in philosophy from Virginia Tech, where he was subsequently a lecturer in moral, political, and existential philosophy. He received his M.S.L.S. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where his master’s research on authenticity, motivation, and information literacy learning won the Dean’s Achievement Award for the Best Master’s paper of 2013 in the School of Information in Library Science. He has presented nationally on student motivation and learning both in and outside the library profession. He has published articles on the application of humanistic and existential psychology to learner-centered information literacy learning in journals such as College and Research Libraries and Reference Services Review.

Dani Brecher Cook is director of teaching & learning at University of California, Riverside. She holds an MSLS from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and an A.B. in English Literature from the University of Chicago. She has published on information literacy pedagogy and learning technologies in College & Research Libraries NewsReference & User Services Quarterly, and Communications in Information Literacy. She has presented on the intersection of these two topics nationally at conferences such as ACRL, LITA, LOEX, and the Library Technology Conference. Along with Kevin Michael Klipfel, Cook is the co-founder of Rule Number One: A Library Blog.

Registration for this ALA Publishing eLearning Solutions facilitated eCourse, which begins on November 13, 2017, can be purchased at the ALA Store. Participants in this course will need regular access to a computer with an internet connection for online message board participation, viewing online video, listening to streaming audio (MP3 files), and downloading and viewing PDF and PowerPoint files.

ALA Publishing eLearning Solutions (ELS) produces high-quality professional development events and materials for the library profession. ELS events cover modern issues on a wide variety of topics in formats that include live workshops, asynchronous eCourses, and print publications. We help ensure that today’s library employees have access to the professional development opportunities they need, whether they are brushing up on the basics or expanding their horizons with cutting-edge tools. Contact us at elsmarketing@ala.org.

ALA Store purchases fund advocacy, awareness, and accreditation programs for library professionals worldwide.