Information Technology and Libraries (ITAL) Volume 23, Number 3 September 2004

Feature Articles

Retrieval of Chinese Language Titles in Pinyin: A Comparative Study

JIE HUANG, (95-100) [PDF]

Different library departments must work together, both formally and informally, in implementing encoded archival description and in repackaging descriptive information about archival collections to other formats, particularly machine-readable cataloging. The authors, one a technical services librarian and the other a special collections archivist, describe their experiences collaborating in these processes at The Ohio State University. Although other institutions may differ in their organizational structure, the authors hope to provide technical guidance, as well as a model of collaboration between archivists and technical services personnel. Careful dialogue and planning are essential to transcend the traditional divide between archival and library descriptive practices and systems.

Applying Geographic Information Systems to the Weber County Library System

JANAE KINIKIN, (102-107) [PDF]

The most powerful marketing, service, and information-distribution tool a library has today is its Web site, but providing Web content in many languages is complex. Before allocating scarce technical and financial resources, it is valuable to learn about writing systems, types of writing, how computers render and represent writing systems, and to study potential problem areas and their possible solutions. The accepted Web standard for presenting languages is Unicode and a full understanding of its history and the coding tools it provides is essential to making appropriate decisions for specific multilingual and internationalization projects. Actual coding examples, as well as a sampling of existing multilingual library services, also serve to illuminate the path of implementation.

Jump Higher: Analyzing Web-Site Rank in Google

LISA ZHAO, (108-118) [PDF]

Library acquisitions has moved from paper to online records for ordering and receiving, but the audit archive for invoices has remained largely paper based. Document-management technology (DMT) offers a solution to this condition. The authors survey the literature on DMT and its potential for use in the library acquisitions environment. This article considers the rationale and policy decisions that underpin the elimination of paper in favor of image files as an audit archive in library materials invoicing. A case study of the implementation of DMT to support and enhance traditional invoice processing in the acquisitions department of a large research library is included.

Communications

[PDF]

Providing Access to Foreign Language Electronic Resources

EILEEN LLONA, EMALEE CRAFT, KEIKO YOKOTA-CARTER, AND DAVID PHAM, (119-122)

A workshop sponsored by the North Carolina Collection at East Carolina University to familiarize middle school teachers with the Eastern Carolina Digital History Exhibits and provide lesson plans for the site revealed (1) the need for teachers and librarians to work more closely together in the design and use of new digital history resources and (2) the benefits of cooperative efforts. Although the K–12 community generally welcomes digital resources, teachers face important challenges, such as redesigning the curriculum. What the teachers had to say, as well as a few other unexpected findings, proved beneficial to the librarians in creating sites. Small workshops were shown to be useful to both teachers and librarians.

Will Libraries’Web-based Survey Methods Replace Existing Non-Electronic Survey Methods?

GAY HELEN PERKINS, (123-126)

This paper discusses how Microsoft Project 2000 was utilized at the University of Central Florida Libraries to manage an e-reference implementation project. As libraries today adopt more information technologies, efficiently managing projects can be challenging. The authors’ experience in the implementation of QuestionPoint e-reference software in October 2003 is described. Their conclusion illustrates that project-management tools, such as Microsoft Project 2000, offer practical workflow-management techniques for libraries. This article represents the first attempt to discuss the use of Microsoft Project 2000 to manage a library project.

Tutorial

Segregating Library Users in a Microsoft Windows Client/Server Environment to Control Access to Public Printers

PERRY C. HORNER AND DENNIS ISBELL, (128-132) [PDF]

A workshop sponsored by the North Carolina Collection at East Carolina University to familiarize middle school teachers with the Eastern Carolina Digital History Exhibits and provide lesson plans for the site revealed (1) the need for teachers and librarians to work more closely together in the design and use of new digital history resources and (2) the benefits of cooperative efforts. Although the K–12 community generally welcomes digital resources, teachers face important challenges, such as redesigning the curriculum. What the teachers had to say, as well as a few other unexpected findings, proved beneficial to the librarians in creating sites. Small workshops were shown to be useful to both teachers and librarians.

Software Reviews

(133-136) [PDF]

Index to Advertisers

(136)

Correction

(136)