Information Technology and Libraries (ITAL) Volume 22, Number 2 June 2003

Table of Contents

President's Column

Inaugural Column
PAT ENSOR

Guest Editorial

The Changing Role of Libraries in Instructional Support
SUSAN LO

Feature Articles

The Village of ISS: Providing Library-Based Instructional Support
HOWARD CARTER AND KEVIN RUNDBLAD

An Organizational Model for Instructional Support at a Community College
JACQUELINE MUNDELL, CORYL CELENE-MARTEL, AND TOM BRAZIUNAS

Building a New Infrastructure for Digital Media: Northwestern University Library
M. CLAIRE STEWART AND H. FRANK CERVONE

Collaborative Digitization Projects: Opportunities to Enhance Teaching and Learning
ADRIENE LIM

Communications

Arts Instruction in the Age of Technology: Providing Library Services to Support Studio and Survey Faculty Who Use Technology for Instruction
BELLA KARR GERLICH AND AMY PERRIER

Improving Art History Education: Library and Faculty Partnerships in Instructional Technology Development
TARA L. DIRST

Developing the Online Learning Environment: The Pros and Cons of Using WebCT for Library Instruction
ELIZABETH W. KRAEMER

Book Review

Book Review

Index to Advertisers



President's Column

   Inaugural Column
PAT ENSOR

Editor's Note: The full text of this column is available.

Editorial

   Guest Editorial: The Changing Role of Libraries in Instructional Support
SUSAN LO

Editor's Note: The full text of this editorial is available.


Feature Articles

   The Village of ISS: Providing Library-Based Instructional Support
HOWARD CARTER AND KEVIN RUNDBLAD

Institutions want courses that incorporate the latest instructional technology. Instructors cannot take advantage of new technology if they are unfamiliar with the tools and have limited experience with online learning pedagogies. It has been said that it takes a village to build a curriculum in the information age. Morris Library’s Instructional Support Services (ISS) is such a village. ISS provides instructors with technical advice and access to current hardware, software, and multimedia techniques to meet their teaching objectives. Offering instructional designers, Web programmers, and video and graphics professionals, ISS is a one-stop shop for instructors who want to add technology to their courses.

Editor's Note: The full text of this article is available.

Howard Carter (hcarter@lib.siu.edu) is Manager, Instructional Support Services and Web Coordinator at Southern Illinois University Carbondale. Kevin Rundblad (krundbla@lib.siu.edu) is Instructional Development Librarian at Southern Illinois University Carbondale.


   An Organizational Model for Instructional Support at a Community College
JACQUELINE MUNDELL, CORYL CELENE-MARTEL, AND TOM BRAZIUNAS

The Instructional and Information Support Services (IISS) division at North Seattle (Wash.) Community College brings together the college’s Library, Media Services, and Distance Learning (DL) units, and the Teaching and Learning Center to support instruction campus-wide under a dean with a required MLS. With its active instructional focus, the Library is integral to the division. IISS is also the administrative home of Interdisciplinary Studies. This organizational model promotes interaction, collaboration, and innovation among disparate units that have the same overall goal of fostering teaching excellence and student success. A connection to Internet II and a campus gigabit backbone make possible a variety of advanced technological options to enhance instruction.

Editor's Note: The full text of this article is available.

Jacqueline Mundell (jmundell@sccd.ctc.edu) is Dean of Instructional and Information Support Services, Coryl Celene-Martel (ccelenem@sccd.ctc.edu) is Assistant Manager/Instructional Technologist of the Teaching and Learning Center, and Tom Braziunas (tbraziun@sccd.ctc.edu) is Director of Distance Learning at North Seattle (Wash.) Community College.


   Building a New Infrastructure for Digital Media: Northwestern University Library

M. CLAIRE STEWART AND H. FRANK CERVONE

The Northwestern University Library has been a pioneer in text and media digitization. From early efforts primarily focused on enhancing access to reserve material to current projects involving vast quantities of streaming media, in great part these projects have been the result of close collaboration between the library and other units on campus, particularly Academic Technologies. As the depth and breadth of digitization efforts have increased, so have the technological and organizational issues. This article examines the history of digitization efforts at Northwestern University as a context for exploring the emerging issues most libraries face as digitization enters a new era.

Editor's Note: The full text of this article is available.

M. Claire Stewart (claire-stewart@northwestern.edu) is Head of Digital Media Services and H. Frank Cervone (f-cervone@northwestern.edu) is Assistant University Librarian for Information Technology at Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois.


   Collaborative Digitization Projects: Opportunities to Enhance Teaching and Learning

ADRIENE LIM

Many libraries assist faculty in the development of digital materials for instruction, with services ranging from scanning documents for electronic course reserves to providing digital production centers for faculty use. But what types of services are best offered by librarians when the development of instructional materials takes the form of formal, more complex digitization projects? This article describes one such collaborative project, the Dorothea June Grossbart Historic Costume Collection (HCC) at Wayne State University (WSU), and examines how building this digital resource has offered new opportunities for librarians to expand their partnerships with faculty and meet shared educational goals.

Adriene Lim (ab7155@wayne.edu) is a Librarian and the Digital Library Services Team Leader at Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan.


Communications

   Arts Instruction in the Age of Technology: Providing Library Services to Support Studio and Survey Faculty Who Use Technology for Instruction
BELLA KARR GERLICH AND AMY PERRIER

Where students once came into higher learning equipped with pencils and protractors, paintbrushes and easels, scores and record player, today’s art student arrives armed with laptop, speakers, and wireless card. Just as academic institutions must adapt and restructure instruction modules around the twenty-first-century student, so must university libraries provide new services to support studio and survey faculty as they change teaching methodologies and pedagogies. At Carnegie Mellon University Libraries, services to support technology in education include digitization workstations, creating and maintaining digital image collections, and implementing audio e-reserves.

Bella Karr Gerlich (bg2r@andrew.cmu.edu), Head, Arts and Special Collections, and Amy Perrier (aperrier@andrew.
cmu.edu), Arts Resource Specialist, Carnegie Mellon University Libraries, Pittsburgh.


   Improving Art History Education: Library and Faculty Partnerships in Instructional Technology Development
TARA L. DIRST

This article discusses the provenance of a partnership between the Digital Projects Department (DPD) at Northern Illinois University (NIU) Libraries and NIU’s Art History Department that seeks to improve art education at NIU. Academic librarians and other library personnel have unique skills, which along with providing traditional library services, should be utilized to meet instructional and educational challenges. Since DPD has a history of providing access to multimedia content via the Internet, it seemed natural to partner with the art history department to create a tool for accessing slides of artwork via the Web.

Editor's Note: The full text of this article is available.

Tara L. Dirst (tdirst@niu.edu), Technology Coordinator, Digital Projects, Northern Illinois University Libraries, DeKalb.


   Developing the Online Learning Environment: The Pros and Cons of Using WebCT for Library Instruction

ELIZABETH W. KRAEMER

Rising enrollments at Oakland University (OU) have required librarians to decrease instruction time with each basic writing class in order to preserve contact with all sections. As a result, the faculty at Kresge Library developed an online instruction module to familiarize students with library research. Using WebCT course management software, the librarians are able to introduce students to basic library skills so that in-class time can be used to teach more advanced research techniques. This article focuses on the benefits and drawbacks of using WebCT for such a library instruction program, and the support provided to the instructors of the courses using the module.

Elizabeth W. Kraemer (kraemer@oakland.edu), is an Assistant Professor at Kresge Library, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan.


Book Review

   Mastering the Language of Web Design
Eric A. Meyer. Indianapolis, Ind.: New Riders, 2002.

Editor's note: The full text of this review is available.