Information Technology and Libraries (ITAL) Volume 22, Number 1, March 2003

Table of Contents

Editorial

When Did the Rules Change?
DAN MARMION

Feature Articles

Subject Web Page Management without HTML Coding: Two Approaches
LINDA BILLS, RACHEL J. CHENG, and ALAN J. NATHANSON

HERMES: The Hopkins Electronic Resource Management System
MARK CYZYK AND NATHAN D.M. ROBERTSON

The Impact of Information Technology on Job Requirements and Qualifications for Catalogers
ZAHIRUDDIN KHURSHID

Remote Observation Strategies for Usability Testing
SUSAN M. THOMPSON

Communications

TECHXNY June 2002 and Implications for Libraries
JUDITH GELERNTER

Digital Divide in India: Need for Correcting Urban Bias
N. PARVATHAMMA

Establishing Our Presence in Courseware: Adding Library Services to the Virtual Classroom
JOHN D. SHANK and NANCY H. DEWALD

Book Review

Book Review

Index to Advertisers

Axonix

Harris Info Source

InfoUSA

Keystone Systems

Library Technologies

LITA

University of Washington


Editorial

   Editorial: When Did the Rules Change? (p. 2)
DAN MARMION

Editor's Note: Full Text Available



Feature Articles

    Subject Web Page Management without HTML Coding: Two Approaches (p. 4)
LINDA BILLS, RACHEL J. CHENG, and ALAN J. NATHANSON

This article describes two examples using relational databases to streamline the creation and management of active, Web-based subject bibliographies. Before the database approach, library staff expended considerable time and effort compiling subject Web-resource pages to guide users to high-quality resources. The process of producing subject guides was tedious, repetitive, and labor intensive, requiring librarians to become proficient at the intricate task of Web-page creation. Since identical resources, descriptions, and links frequently appear on several different pages, there was considerable duplication of information. Wesleyan University and the Tri-College Consortium each, independently, sought to solve this problem by creating a database of resource information and a process for mapping guide pages. This report compares their different approaches, contrasting in-house versus outsourcing approaches, an independent database versus one built from OPAC, and open source versus proprietary software.

Editor's Note: Full Text Available

Linda Bills(lbills@brynmawr.edu) is Special Projects Coordinator for the Tri-College Consortium (Bryn Mawr, Haverford, Swarthmore), Haverford, Pennsylvania. Rachel J. Cheng (rcheng@emich.edu) is University Librarian, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti. Alan J. Nathanson (anathanson@wesleyan.edu) is Bibliographer/Reference Librarian at Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut.



    HERMES: The Hopkins Electronic Resource Management System (p.12)
MARK CYZYK AND NATHAN D.M. ROBERTSON

This article describes a project undertaken by the Johns Hopkins University libraries to develop a systemwide, Web-based application to facilitate the selection, procurement, implementation, and management of electronic resources and their licenses. The authors detail the history of the project, the function of each of its main application modules, and the various security roles required for administration of the application as well as note similar initiatives and other activities within the library profession to streamline and automate the management of electronic resources.

Editor's Note: Full Text Available

Mark Cyzyk (mcyzyk@jhu.edu) is the Web Architect at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. Nathan D. M. Robertson (nate@jhu.edu) is a Database Analyst/Programmer for the Milton S. Eisenhower Library of the Johns Hopkins University.



    The Impact of Information Technology on Job Requirements and Qualifications for Catalogers (p.18)
ZAHIRUDDIN KHURSHID

Information technology (IT) encompassing an integrated library system, computer hardware and software, CD-ROM, Internet, and other domains, including MARC 21 formats, CORC, and metadata standards (Dublin Core, TEI, XML, RDF) has produced far-reaching changes in the job functions of catalogers. Libraries are now coming up with a new set of recruiting requirements for these positions. This paper aims to review job advertisements published in American Libraries (AL) and College and Research Libraries News (C&RL NEWS) to assess the impact of the use of IT in libraries on job requirements and qualifications for catalogers.

Zahiruddin Khurshid(khurshid@kfupm.edu.sa) is Senior Manager, Cataloging Operations Division, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Library, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia.



    Remote Observation Strategies for Usability Testing (p.22)
SUSAN M. THOMPSON

Observation is the cornerstone of usability testing and an important strategy in evaluating library Web sites. Traditionally, test administrators have directly observed test users as they interact with the Web site interface. Remote observation offers an alternative that may facilitate the testing process and offer additional capabilities. Usability testing during the California State University San Marcos (CSUSM) Library Web site redesign used a simple remote observation strategy to view the test user's screen on another computer removed from the test location. The library investigated Timbuktu, NetMeeting, and Camtasia as potential software tools to assist in remote observation.

Editor's Note: Full Text Available

Susan M. Thompson(sthompsn@csusm.edu) is Systems Coordinator, California State University San Marcos.


Communications

    TECHXNY June 2002 and Implications for Libraries (p.32)
JUDITH GELERNTER

If the morning weather report predicted rain, would you carry an umbrella? The annual Technology Exchange Week (TECHXNY) conference predicts gales and calms in the information technology (IT) industry, and we in library IT who share the climate should listen. Whether you choose to carry an umbrella is up to you--and your patrons.

Judith Gelernter(judith.gelernter@theunionclub.com) is the Library Director for the Union Club of the City of New York.


   Digital Divide in India: Need for Correcting Urban Bias (p.35)
N. PARVATHAMMA

A digital library is a capital- and technology-intensive project. It is a great challenge to develop digital libraries in countries like India in light of the problems of shrinking budget; high initial and recurring expenditure; and social and economic problems of illiteracy, population growth, poor health conditions, inadequacy of resources for development programs, and weak infrastructure. While access to digital information is possible in more than two hundred cities in India, ãvoice telephonyä is still a major medium of information transfer in villages. This paper discusses the social and economic issues that need to be considered to bridge this digital divide between rural and urban populations in order to ensure sustainable development of the country.

N. Parvathamma(parvathi_glb@yahoo.co.in) is Reader, Department of Library and Information Science, Gulbarga University, Karnataka, India.


   Establishing Our Presence in Courseware: Adding Library Services to the Virtual Classroom (p.38)
JOHN D. SHANK and NANCY H. DEWALD

Course management systems and software (courseware) are increasingly being used to enhance traditional college courses, yet library resources and services are noticeably missing from this venue. Libraries risk being bypassed by this technology and losing relevance to students and faculty if they do not establish their presence in courseware. Librarians need to be proactive in inserting links to resources and to library assistance within the courseware domain in order to retain visibility, increase relevance with students, and strengthen relationships with faculty.

John D. Shank (jds30@psu.edu) is an Instructional Design Librarian and Head of Instructional Design Services at Penn State University, Berks-Lehigh Valley College. Nancy H. Dewald (nxd7@psu.edu) is a Reference Librarian at Penn State University, Berks Campus.

Editor's note: Full Text Available


Book Review (p. 44)

    CORC: New Tools and Possibilities for Cooperative Electronic Resource Description
Karen Calhoun, John J. Riemer, eds. New York: Haworth, 2001.

Editor's note: Full Text Available