Information Technology and Libraries (ITAL) Volume 20, Number 2, June 2001

Table of Contents

Editorial

Why is ITAL Important?
DAN MARMION

Feature Articles

Improving Retrieval of Microform Set Records: Updating 008 Dates for Records Cataloged Prior to 1991
MARY DABNEY WILSON AND JOHN PAUL FULLERTON

Speakeasy Studio and Café: Information Literacy, Web-Based Library Instruction, and Technology
MARK JACOBS

E-Book Technology: Waiting for the "False Pretender"
STEPHEN SOTTONG

Three Iterations of an Academic Library Web Site
JASON VAUGHAN

Searching for the Library: University Home Page Design and Missing Links
ROBERTA J. ASTROFF

Communications

Data Retrieval from Library Systems Based on the Open Systems Model
ALAN CORNISH

E-Books and New Library Service Models: An Analysis of the Impact of E-Book Technology on Academic Libraries
RONALD JANTZ

Internet Access in Public Libraries: Results of an End User Targeted Pilot Study, 1997-2000
HARRY M. KIBIRIGE

Index to Advertisers

Info USA

Library Technologies, Inc.


Editorial p.58-59

   Why is ITAL Important?
DAN MARMION

Editor's note: The full text available.


Feature Articles

   Improving Retrieval of Microform Set Records: Updating 008 Dates for Records Cataloged Prior to 1991 (p.60-65)
MARY DABNEY WILSON AND JOHN PAUL FULLERTON

A change in USMARC coding in bibliographic records for reproductions was implemented in 1991, and that change created inconsistencies between post-1991 major microform record sets and ones already existing in library catalogs. Because retrieval and display in OPACs may depend on Date 1 in USMARC field 008, this particular inconsistency has become more apparent and troublesome as records with newer coding have been added to catalogs containing records with older coding. Libraries have several choices in preserving their investment in the pre-1991 records. One way is automated editing of the records. We describe one method using Visual Basic.

Mary Dabney Wilson ( mdw@tamu.edu) is Director of Cataloging and John Paul Fullerton ( j-fullerton@tamu.edu) is Library Associate, Humanities/Social Sciences Services, at Texas A&M University Libraries.


   Speakeasy Studio and Café: Information Literacy, Web-Based Library Instruction, and Technology (p.66-71)
MARK JACOBS

Library instruction in the modern university is, increasingly, the task of creating and maintaining an information-literate populace well-schooled in advanced principles of information access. The librarian/teacher strives to help students develop scholarly research and information-gathering skills. The world the student prepares to enter is a digital one and the best-prepared student is the one who has learned the important skills of critical thinking and the art of the question while immersed in the Web-based environment of a discussion tool like Speakeasy Studio and Café.

Editor's Note: The full text available.

Mark Jacobs ( majacobs@wsu.edu) is Electronic Resources/Serials Cataloging Librarian at Washington State University, Pullman.



   E-Book Technology: Waiting for the "False Pretender" (p.72-80)
STEPHEN SOTTONG

Raymond Kurzweil proposed seven stages in the "life cycle of a technology." Libraries can use the technology life cycle concept to determine when to invest in newer technologies. Kurzweil gave no criteria for determining what stage a technology had achieved in the life cycle. This article will present a set of criteria to evaluate new technologies within the framework of the life cycle, demonstrating their applicability using Kurzweil's example of audio technology and then applying the criteria to current e-book technology.

Editor's Note: The full text of this article is available at  The full text available.

Stephen Sottong ( ssotton@calstatela.edu) is Engineering, Technology, and Computer Science Librarian and Leader of the Library Information Technology Team, California State University, Los Angeles.


   Three Iterations of an Academic Library Web Site (p.81-92)
JASON VAUGHAN

Most, if not all academic libraries have a presence on the World Wide Web. Such a presence often serves to disseminate information on library collections and services, and also serves as a portal to electronic resources. The University of Nevada­Las Vegas (UNLV) Libraries' first major Web site became operational in 1996, with major revisions occurring in 1998 and again in 2000. Each instance has involved an evaluation of the home page, electronic resource provision, and other discussions related to Web site design and content. Tracking overall changes of a single Web site serves not only as a historical record of this technology as it pertains to academic libraries, but also helps illustrate the changes made in an effort to maintain a current, user-friendly offering.

Jason Vaughan ( jvaughan@ccmail.nevada.edu) is Head of the Systems Section, University of Nevada­Las Vegas.


   Searching for the Library: University Home Page Design and Missing Links (p.93-99)
ROBERTA J. ASTROFF

Genre analysis is used to explain the placement of links to the library on more than one hundred college and university home pages. Despite the lack of established standards, university home page design falls into common patterns, indicating genre development. However, a number of university home pages do not provide a direct link to the library Web pages and thus disrupt user expectations. On those sites, the Web designers provide other access to the library Web pages either through redundancy or by classifying the library with other services. Omitting an active link to the library does not serve design principles, users, or universities well.

Editor's Note: The full text of this article is available at The full text available.

Roberta Astroff is Humanities Librarian and Coordinator, Digital Resources Center, Arts and Humanities Library, Penn State University.


Communications

   Data Retrieval from Library Systems Based on the Open Systems Model (p.100-103)
ALAN CORNISH

This article describes an important advantage of relational, structured query language (SQL)-compliant databases: that they enable a library to employ standard report-building software to retrieve data from multiple data sources. The ability of a library's integrated library system and other major systems to support this type of data retrieval is of critical importance. Two SQL reporting tools, Cognos Impromptu and Seagate Crystal Reports, are briefly reviewed.

Alan Cornish ( cornish@wsu.edu) is a Systems Librarian at the Washington State University Libraries.


   E-Books and New Library Service Models: An Analysis of the Impact of E-Book Technology on Academic Libraries (p.104-112)
RONALD JANTZ

This article will analyze the implications of e-book technology on academic libraries. Although we are at a very early stage of e-book evolution, business models, standards, and supporting technology are under development that will dramatically affect libraries and librarians. Librarians and administrators therefore must understand thoroughly these trends in order to apply effectively the resulting innovations within their institutions. As Martrell states, ". . . librarians must begin to design an imaginative, easily identifiable space in cyberspace as the centrality of the library as a physical phenomenon slowly fades."1 Improving library service by extrapolation from existing services, doing the same things faster and better, will provide incremental improvements but will not move us quickly to that "identifiable space" of which Martrell writes.

Editor's Note: The full text of this communication is available at  The full text available.

Ronald Jantz ( rjantz@rci.rutgers.edu) is Government and Social Sciences Data Librarian, Rutgers University Libraries.


   Internet Access in Public Libraries: Results of an End User Targeted Pilot Study, 1997-2000 (p.113-114)
HARRY M. KIBIRIGE

For ages, the public library has championed the general public's right to information. According to Johnson and Harris the purpose of the public library in the western world has been to act as a "guardian of the people's right to know."1 This philosophy pervaded the second half of the twentieth century and is implicitly currently upheld by the ALA Library Bill of Rights. The 1999 United States Department of Commerce Report on the use of technology in the United States, titled Falling Through the Net III: Defining the Digital Divide (http://purl.access.gpo.gov/GPO/LPS3064), made significant revelations on Internet access.2 According to the report, 42 percent of American households own computers but only 25 percent of all U.S. households are connected to the Internet. Such statistics make the public library an important access point to the information superhighway, since a sizeable number of the U.S. population does not have access from their homes.

Harry M. Kibirige is Associate Professor, Queens College, City University of New York