Building Services Around Reproducibility & Open Scholarship

Wednesday, 11/1/2017 - Wednesday, 11/22/2017
Open Science Framework logo
As research across domains of study has become increasingly reliant on digital tools, the challenges in achieving reproducibility have grown. Alongside this reproducibility challenge are the demands for open scholarship, such as releasing code, data, and articles under an open license. Openness is an important step towards reproducibility, but it cannot be the end of the road. Before, researchers out in the field used to capture their environments through observation, drawings, photographs, and videos; now, researchers and librarians must capture digital environments and what they contain (code and data, for instance) to achieve reproducibility. Librarians are well-positioned to help patrons open their scholarship, and it's time to build in reproducibility as a part of our services, and data management services. Librarians are already engaged with research data management, open access publishing, grant compliance, pre-registration, and it's time we as a profession add reproducibility to that repertoire. 
 
This class will focus on open scholarship and reproducibility as two distinct but connected topics. We will first take a look at the discourse around open scholarship, and the tools that both researchers and librarians are using to engage in open work. This includes the use of open source tools, creating an open web presence, preregistration of research, preparing research output for publication, and linking those outputs to more traditional publications. I’ll also touch on how I’ve integrated these practices into building a research data management service. 
 
Next, we’ll look at reproducibility and the intersection of open research and reproducibility. After defining our terms, we will look at studies around reproducibility as a basis for understanding best practices. We’ll also discuss how libraries are currently building and contributing to a culture of open, reproducible research within their institutions. I will demonstrate and teach emerging tools for reproducibility that students can take back to their institutions, and how they can bring back principles of reproducibility to their existing or emerging services.
 
This is a blended format web course:
 
The course will be delivered as 4 separate live webinar lectures, one per week on Webnesdays, November 1, 8, 15 and 22, at Noon, Central time. You do not have to attend the live lectures in order to participate. The webinars will be recorded and distributed through the web course platform for asynchronous participation. The web course space will also contain the exercises and discussions for the course.
 

Takeaways

This course will examine, cover and discuss:
  • The discourse around open scholarship
  • Best practices around use of open source tools, creating an open web presence, preparing research output for publication, and linking those outputs to more traditional publications.
  • The tools that both researchers and librarians are using to engage in open work.
  • Integrating these practices & tools into building a research data management service.
  • Examine reproducibility and the intersection of open research and reproducibility.
  • Look at the rhetoric and studies around reproducibility as a basis for understanding best practices.
  • How libraries are currently building and contributing to a culture of open, reproducible research within their institutions.
  • Demonstrate and teach emerging tools for reproducibility
  • How they can bring back principles of reproducibility to their existing or emerging services.
  • Introspective discussion on openness and reproducibility within library and information science research, and how we can ‘walk the walk’ as a profession, instead of only ‘talking the talk.’
Students in this online course will have access to a completely open source curriculum via the Open Science Framework under a CC license for students to reuse and modify. Some potential materials include:
  • open access articles and bibliographies on openness and reproducibility
  • tutorials for all tools mentioned and used in class
  • slide decks for each class
  • exercises for tools
  • lots of outreach tools
 

Who Should Attend

Data services librarians, data librarians, or those interested in providing data services, those interested in open research & open access.
  • Learn methods of integrating standards of openness & reproducibility in libraries services
  • Become proficient in the tools that researchers and librarians use to enable openness and reproducibility of scholarship
  • Apply best practices for openness and reproducibility within library scholarship -- aka, walking the walk 

 

Instructors

Vicky Steeves

Vicki Steeves headshot
 
Vicky Steeves is the Librarian for Research Data Management and Reproducibility, a dual appointment between New York University Division of Libraries and NYU Center for Data Science. In this role, she works supporting researchers in creating well-managed, high quality, and reproducible research through facilitating use of tools such as ReproZip, the Open Science Framework, Git and GitHub, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Vicky engages with researchers and librarians on open scholarship and reproducibility through individual consultations, workshops, embedded teaching in courses, and regularly scheduled library classes. Vicky has also given presentations and workshops on openness and reproducibility at conferences such as LITA, ACRL, and PASIG.
 

Registration

Cost

  • LITA Member: $135
  • ALA Member: $195
  • Non-member: $260

Moodle and Webinar login info will be sent to registrants the week prior to the start date.

How to Register

Register here, courses are listed by date and you need to log in.

OR

Contact ALA Registration:  call 1-800-545-2433 and press 5 or email registration@ala.org or submit print registration form [PDF]

Tech Requirements

The course will be delivered via the Moodle courseware system.  Participants will need an internet connection and computer with a current operating system and web browser. Further details will be provided prior to the course start.  The course will proceed weekly for 4 weeks with an optional two weeks if students need more time to complete assignments.

The live, synchronous lectures will require attendee participation via internet audio. Attendees will need a wired, high-speed internet connection, and a headset or speakers.  It is recommended that attendees use headsets connected to their computers (VOIP) during an Adobe Connect session. All attendees are muted and should use the built in chat function to communicate with presenters.  The use of computer speakers with a mic is not recommended, as it may cause echo. The recommended browser is Firefox although other browsers should work well for attending.

Alternately the webinar recordings can be viewed after the live lecture using a standard web browser, internet connection, and audio out capability to speakers or head phones.

Contact

For questions about registration, contact ALA Registration:  call 1-800-545-2433 and press 5 or email registration@ala.org.

For all other questions or comments related to the course, contact LITA at (312) 280-4268 or Mark Beatty at mbeatty@ala.org.