School Libraries

On-DemandWebinarFree!
Learn about the popular and award-winning Voices of Race series, winner of the 2016 ALA Excellence in Library Programming Award.
On-DemandWebinarFree!
Find out how a school librarian and a history teacher created an interactive research project that engaged their entire school community in learning about the 1960 Greensboro (N.C.) lunch counter sit-ins, a seminal part of the Civil Rights Movement. In this webinar, Constance Vidor, director of library services at the Friends Seminary, a K-12 independent Quaker school in New York City, will share how how a research project can become a community event that offers opportunities for discussion, reflection and discovery.
Attendees will have an opportunity to ask questions pertaining to advocacy issues at their library, as well as learn what resources are available to help make the case for libraries.
On-DemandWebinarFree!
Two leaders from the arts and culture sector share best practices for community engagement gleaned from their 20+ years in the field.
On-DemandWebinarFree!
Parents are faced with ever-expanding media options to share with their children, and many children’s librarians are beginning to incorporate apps and eBooks for young children into their collections and programming to satisfy the growing need for reader's advisory in the app space ("Appvisory"). This webinar will explore why and how incorporating digital media into our collections and programming is now an essential part of children’s librarianship, and tips and tricks for translating traditional storytelling techniques into the digital realm.
Self-PacedeCourse
This course is not being offered at this time. Please note: for groups who have 20 or more individuals interested in taking the course, we can also offer it exclusively to your organization! In this YALSA online course, find out how to go Beyond Booklists to serve today's teens, the most diverse generation ever. Participants will learn about available tools to help them identify the diverse teen populations in their service area and explore ways to design, implement and evaluate more in-depth services and programs for the diverse teen population and recent teen immigrants.
On-DemandWebinarFree!
Have we lost our ability to count? As school library collections become increasingly digital and less visible, school librarians will need to find new ways to evaluate their collections and demonstrate their value to stakeholders. Shelves bulging with books were never a clear measure of student access to those books and the ideas and information they contained. Today’s resources require new technologies and kinds of infrastructure that need to be counted along with the numbers of titles.
Diane McNutt and Jane Light, Silicon Valley Reads, will describe this library’s "one book-one community" program in Santa Clara (Calif.) County. Its 2012 program, "Muslim and American -Two Perspectives," featured two books written by American Muslims, ("The Muslim Next Door" by Sumbul Ali-Karamali and "The Butterfly Mosque" by G. Willow Wilson). More than 100 programs were presented, including author readings, panel discussions, films, an open house evening at a local mosque and an art exhibit.
On-DemandWebinarFree!
In this webinar, learn how to leverage observation skills to “see” how students interact while working, what tools they choose to use, where they enjoy spending time and what activities naturally lead them into exploration. Learn how to observe people’s behavior and appreciate their comfort zones then use those observation skills to direct you in planning your school library.
Frontline library advocates work at all levels in all types of libraries—public, academic, school and special—and are the internal/external face and voice of the library. They can tell the library’s story and deliver the library’s message at their comfort level and with people they know best. Because every staff member is the face of the library to his/her respective community, each infl uences what the community knows and thinks about the library; and all librarians and library staff are perfectly poised to inform people about their library’s value and needs.

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