Phyllis Dain Library History Dissertation Award

About the Phyllis Dain Library History Dissertation Award
The Library History Round Table of the American Library Association (ALA) sponsors the biennial Phyllis Dain Library History Dissertation Award. The award is offered only in odd-numbered years. The award, named in honor of a library historian widely known as a supportive advisor and mentor as well as a rigorous scholar and thinker, recognizes outstanding dissertations in English in the general area of library history. Five hundred dollars and a certificate are given for a selected dissertation that embodies original research on a significant topic relating to the history of libraries during any period, in any region of the world.

The award, named in honor of a library historian widely known as a supportive advisor and mentor as well as a rigorous scholar and thinker, recognizes outstanding dissertations in the general area of library history.

Administered by:

Library History Round Table logo

Award and Frequency

An award of $500 given every other year.
This award is given out on a biennial basis.

Eligibility

Dissertations completed and accepted during the preceding two academic years are eligible. Dissertations from 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 will compete for the 2015 award.

Application Instructions

FourĀ copies of the dissertation and a letter of support from the doctoral advisor or from another faculty member at the degree-granting institution are required. Submissions must be received by January 16, 2015.Ā  Receipt will be confirmed within four business days.

Fax and e-mail are not acceptable.

Contact Information

Barry W. Seaver (Chair, July 1, 2013, to July 1, 2015)
Rudolph Rose (Staff Liaison, July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2015) - nrose@ala.org
American Library Association
50 E Huron St
Chicago, IL 60611-2788

Displaying active committee roster as of 04/21/2014. Last retrieved on 04/21/2014. Members can log in to view full contact information for committee members.

Selection Criteria

Entries are judged on: clear definition of the research questions and/or hypotheses; use of appropriate primary resources; depth of research; superior quality of writing; and significance of the conclusions. The round table is particularly interested in dissertations that place the subject within its broader historical, social, cultural, and political context and make interdisciplinary connections with print culture and information studies.