Lapsit program

From Jennie Rothschild at the Oxon Hill Branch of the Prince George’s County (MD) Library:

“Every week, I do a story time for infants-- age birth-12 months. It's a lapsit program, so it's designed to have one child + one adult. (Sometimes in the case of siblings or twins, there's more than one child per adult.) The program lasts for 20 minutes and is attended on a drop-in basis. I don't do preregistration because they're BABIES! You never know if you're going to get out the door in time! Fire code says there can only be 25 people in the story time room, including me, so attendance is capped at 12 babies + 12 adults. Many people wonder what the point in doing story time for kids this young is. We want to expose kids to regular library attendance and books as soon as possible. I love the idea that these kids will have regular library trips as part of their routine since birth. There's the bonding element between adult and baby. There's exposure to nursery rhymes and tickles and songs and bounces-- all of which have been shown to be very good for baby brain development. It also lets the babies interact with other babies. They LOVE this! Mostly though, it's a program for parents. I teach them new rhymes and songs they can do at home. I model interactive reading and how to share these rhymes and stories so they can continue these interactions with their children throughout the day. And, even though this isn't one of the library's goals, I know the parents like meeting other parents, they like getting out of the house and meeting new people and exchanging tips and ideas. They often stay for a long time after the program has ended to talk and many friendships and playgroups have been formed out of story time. That's not why we do the program, but it's a darn cool side effect.”

Sample Program

Welcome Song:  Where is Baby?

Where is baby? Where is baby?
There (s)he is! There (s)he is!
I’m so glad to see you, I’m so glad to see you
Peek-a-boo! Peek-a-boo!

Substitute the child’s name for “baby”

Rhyme:  Little Robin Redbreast

Little Robin Redbreast
Sat upon a rail;
Niddle, naddle, went his head,
Wiggle, waggle, went his tail.

Rhyme:  Little Miss Muffet

Little Miss Muffet sat on a tuffet
Eating her curds and whey,
Along came a spider,
Who sat down beside her
And frightened Miss Muffet away

Rhyme:  Jack and Jill

Jack and Jill went up a hill
To fetch a pail of water
Jack fell down and broke his crown
And Jill came tumbling after

Rhyme:  Pease Porridge Hot

Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold
Pease porridge in the pot, 9 days old
Some like it hot, some like it cold
Some like it in the pot, 9 days old

Rhyme:  Hickory Dickory Dock

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck one, the mouse ran down
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck two, the mouse said “woo”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock) 

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck three, the mouse said “wee”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

 Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck four, the mouse said “no more”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Story: 

Where is Baby’s Beach Ball by Karen Katz

Action Rhyme:  These are Baby’s Fingers

These are baby’s fingers
These are baby’s toes
This is baby’s belly button
Round and round it goes!

Lightly touch each body part as it is mentioned. Make a circle or tickle baby on the last line.

Action Songs

You Have Two Arms

(to the tune of “You are My Sunshine”)

You have two arms, they are for waving
You have two feet to go stump stump
You have to eyes, they are for blinking
And a bottom to sit with a bump

The Grand Old Duke of York

The Grand Old Duke of York, he had ten thousand men,
He marched them up to the top of the hill,
And he marched them down again.

And when they were up, they were up,
And when they were down, they were down
And when they were only halfway up
They were neither up nor down!

Stand up or lift baby (or just baby’s arms) up and down according to the rhyme

Bouncing Rhymes

We’re Going Down a Smooth Road

We’re going down a smooth road, a smooth road, a smooth road.
We’re going down a smooth road, a smooth road now.
We’re going down a bumpy road, a bumpy road, a bumpy road.
We’re going down a bumpy road, a bumpy road now.
We’re going down a rough road, a rough road, a rough road.
We’re going down a rough road, UH OH! POTHOLE!

Rock the baby side to side when we’re going down a smooth road. Bounce baby gently when we going down a bumpy road. Bounce baby vigorously when going down a bumpy road. Gently drop baby between your knees or lift baby high in the air when you hit the pothole!

This is the Way the Ladies Ride

This is the way the ladies ride:
Walk walk walk
This is the way the gentlemen ride:
Trot trot trot
This is the way the children ride:
BOOM BOOM BOOM

Bounce the baby on your knee or foot. When the ladies ride, bounce very softly, for the gentlemen, bounce a little more, and then bounce very vigorously when the children ride!

Song

Shake My Sillies Out by Raffi

Story

Yummy Yucky by Leslie Patricelli 

Rhyme: Patty Cake

Patty cake, patty cake
Baker’s man
Bake me a cake as fast as you can!
Roll it, and pat it
And mark it with a B
And throw it in the oven for baby and me! 

Clap baby’s hands for the first three lines. When rolling the cake, roll your hands, and then pat your knees when patting the cake. Draw a B on baby’s hand when marking the cake and mime throwing it in the oven at the end.

Closing Song

(to the tune of Shortnin’ Bread)

Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well
Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well
I’m so glad every little cell
In my body is happy and well
I’m so glad every little cell
In my body is happy and well
Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well