Institute Education Programs

ALSC Connection | Education Programs | Home | Housing | Registration | Schedule | Scholarships | Special Events | Sponsors

ALSC offers a wide variety of education programs at the 2014 ALSC National Institute. All of the programs fall within the theme of the conference: Expanding Our Worlds, Creating Community. Programs will repeat throughout the Institute so that participants have the opportunity to attend eight programs in total. Program dates and times are subject to change.

Program Descriptions

2014 ALSC National Institute

Thursday, September 18, 9:00 - 10:30 am

Inspired Collaboration: Early Childhood Partnerships
Dorothy Stoltz, Carroll County Library (MD); Nancee Dahms-Stinson, Springfield-Greene County Library (MO); Christy Estrovitz, San Francisco Public Library (CA); Betsy Diamant-Cohen, Mother Goose on the Loose LLC

Libraries are redefining their role as partners with parents and child-serving agencies to better serve children birth through five. Please join us for a panel discussion about how libraries are at the “community table” and are creating successful collaborations among early childhood allies – parents, caregivers, agencies, and, public officials. Learn how libraries are incorporating Every Child Ready to Read into partnership efforts.

Making Advocacy Awesome: A Workshop for the Everyday Advocate—You!
Helen Bloch, Oakland Public Library (CA); Jenna Nemec-Loise, Chicago Public Library (IL); Katie O'Dell, Multnomah County Library (OR)

If you hear “advocacy,” and think “scary,” this program is for you! Learn how you’re already an Everyday Advocate and how to maximize the rich resources available on the ALSC Everyday Advocacy website. Engage in hands-on activities and practical applications of the basics for advocating both within your library and beyond it. Come with your questions and leave with simple, effective strategies for making advocacy awesome in your library community.

Sing, Talk, Write, and Play with Math and Science
Saroj Ghoting, Early Childhood Literacy Consultant; Pamela Martin-Diáz, Allen County Public Library (IN)

Looking to incorporate updated Early Learning Standards aligned with math and science common core standards into your library’s storytime programming? Want to gain new perspectives and ideas on developing effective community partnerships? This program shows you how to highlight STEM in any storytime and ways to create opportunities for caregivers and children to explore those concepts both in and outside the library. Participants will explore how one community’s businesses and library came together to help local children get ready for school through early literacy-focused activities incorporating science and math.

Thinking Outside the Storytime Box: Building your Preschool Programming Repertoire
Amy Commers, South St. Paul Public Library (MN); Melissa Depper, Arapahoe Library District (CO); Amy Koester, St. Charles City-County Library District (MO); Marge Loch-Wouters, La Crosse Public Library (WI)

Looking for literacy rich early-childhood programs that are easy, maximize staff resources, and enable you to reach more families in and out of the library? This program has everything you’re looking for, from STEM for preschoolers to dance parties for toddlers. Presenters will share program ideas, planning resources, and early literacy connections to help you leave prepared to build on the core storytime experience. You’ll learn early literacy rationales for non-storytime preschool programs, effective non-storytime programs for community outreach, and how to access and utilize online resources that maximize staff planning time.

 

Thursday, September 18, 10:45 - 11:45 am

Dewey-Lite: A Solution to the Non-Fiction Problem
Elisabeth Gattullo, Darien Public Library (CT); Kiera Parrott, School Library Journal

Frustrated with a system that separates animals on a farm from animals in the jungle but not willing to give up on Dewey just yet? The librarians at Darien Children’s Library were feeling those same frustrations, and created a hybrid model for our non-fiction collection nicknamed Dewey-Lite. This model increases the browsability of non-fiction collections while easing patron’s searching experience. It’s easy and relatively inexpensive to implement and you can, too!

Easy Programming for Discerning Tweens
Ernie Cox, College Community School District (IA); Penny Peck, San Jose State University School of Library and Information Science (CA)

Expand you programming toolbox with these field tested programs for tweens (youth ages 9-13, or grades 4-8), that take into account the unique social, emotional, and developmental needs of young adolescents. Participants will experience a range of options from one-time programs including Star Wars Reading Day, hands-on Maker programs, programs celebrating specific books, authors, or subjects, interactive movie programming, and engaging passive programming. Participants will also learn about ongoing programming series options, including stop motion animation, book discussion groups, Lego clubs, and board and video gaming.

Science of Poetry
Sylvia Vardell, Texas Woman's University; Janet Wong, Author; Susan Blackaby, Poet; Margarita Engle, Poet

This session will present poetry that incorporates science content plus practical strategies for implementation. Poetry offers special language, imagery, and conciseness that introduces or reinforces important science concepts and terminology. We can encourage children to think like a poet and a scientist in carefully observing the world around them using all their senses, maintaining an avid curiosity about how things work, and gathering “big words” and key vocabulary in their reading and their writing.

Using Volunteers to Build Walls
Mary Gay Ducey, Oakland Public Library (CA); Celia Jackson, Oakland Public Library (CA); Randi Voorhies, Books for Wider Horizons; Laurie Willhalm, Oakland Public Library (CA)

Learn how you can implement the Books for Wider Horizons template to expand your library storytimes’ reach while developing an involved group of early literacy volunteers. Celebrating its 20th anniversary in 2014, Oakland Public Library’s Books for Wider Horizons program, uses a volunteer-based storyreading corps to provide Head Starts and Child Development Centers in some of Oakland, CA’s most socioeconomically disadvantaged areas with vital early literacy storytime resources. Learn how to develop the infrastructure required for your own sustainable, success volunteer-based storyreading corps. You’ll receive a template for developing your own program, including how to teach book selection and complete storytime development to volunteers.

 

Thursday, September 18, 1:00 - 2:30 pm

Be a Winner: Inspired Youth Grant Writing
Nancy Baumann, School Librarian/Author; Lisa McClure, Hartford Public Library (CT)


Working on a shoestring to bring creative programming, authors, or resources to your library?  Applying for a grant sounds easy, but how to make your application “stand out” from the others?  Find out how youth grants differ from other grants, and what funders want.  Learn step-by-step grant writing techniques, how to match your need to a grant, and a wealth of available grant opportunities.

Beyond Sensory Storytime: Expanding Library Services to Children with Special Needs
Renee Grassi, Glencoe Public Library (IL)

Whether large or small, rural or urban, all library communities serve children with special needs. If your library already offers Sensory Storytime, what else can you do? Participants will learn how to assess the need for special needs services in their library communities, forge new partnerships with outside organizations, and be inspired by new and innovative programming ideas. This program will also explore strategies to reevaluate and make accommodations in existing youth programs for an inclusive audience.

Summer Lunch at the Library
Patrice Chamberlain, California Summer Meal Coalition; Natalie Cole, California Library Association; Christie Hamm, Sacramento Public Library (CA); Kari Johnson, Fresno County Public Library (CA); Amy Martin, Oakland Public Library (CA); Eva Mitnick, Los Angeles Public Library (CA)

During the summer, low-income children suffer not only from summer learning loss but also from a lack of access to nutritious food. This program demonstrates how California libraries in rural, urban and suburban communities are addressing these challenges by providing free, healthy meals for children in conjunction with their summer reading programs. You’ll gain a deeper understanding of the connection between summer nutrition and summer learning, and the opportunities this connection presents for public libraries. This program will provide information and resources you can use to plan, implement, and evaluate a successful summer lunch program.

Tech Access on a Budget
Cen Campbell, LittleeLit.com; Suzanne Flint, California State Library; Molly Fraker, Berkeley Public Education Fund; Mary Ann Scheuer, Berkeley Unified School District (CA); Andrea Vernola, Kalamazoo Public Library (MI)

Have you ever wanted to bring new technologies like iPads, podcasting or video editing labs to the children and teens you work with, but felt like you can’t even enter the discussion because funding is so tight? This program uses real life case studies to examine ways similarly situated libraries have brought new technologies to children and teens through different funding opportunities from. You’ll learn about different funding opportunities, how to make an effective case for tech, and most importantly, why young patrons benefit from increased access. Participants will leave with immediately implementable ideas, whether a small scale trial or a large scale grant, for increasing access to high quality media and technology on even the most daunting budget.



Thursday, September 18, 2:45 - 3:45 pm

Advocating for Appropriate Technology in the Children’s Spaces
Elizabeth Gray, Yolo County Library (CA)

Have you ever had a parent complain about Early Literacy computers? Have you had co-workers grouse about tweens using computers for games? Are J books part of your e-book budget? Learn how to advocate for children to have access to and use the technology that is now the foundation for their learning experiences. Walk away with tips on how to bring e-books to underserved populations and how to introduce new technologies to your library community.

Every Child Ready to Read® en Español: A How-to Workshop
Lucia Gonzalez, North Miami Public Library (FL); Freda Mosquera, Broward County Library (FL); Abigail Morales, San Diego Public Library (CA); Ana-Elba Pavon, Oakland Public Library (CA); Saroj Ghoting, Early Childhood Literacy Consultant

Whether or not you are already working with your Latino community, whether or not you speak Spanish, come gain practical information on using the new tools of the Spanish ECRR Manual and kit with Latino families, exploring issues of language preferences, literature, regional diversity, and more. Benefit from practical advice to use the materials in a variety of Latino communities.

Removing Barriers to Early Literacy: Increasing Access to Books for Young Children
Stephanie Bailey-White, Idaho Commission for Libraries; Staci Shaw, Idaho Commission for Libraries; Lu Benke, University of Northern Colorado; Beth Crist, Colorado State Library; Megan Ellis, Aurora Public Library (CO); Nancy Maday, Pikes Peak Library District (CO)

The Idaho Commission for Libraries and the Colorado State Library both received IMLS National Leadership Grants to minimize barriers to library services for low-income families. Discover how to turn the findings of both projects into best practices you can use at your library to reach low-income and rural parents of 0-8 with an early literacy message and use innovative, low-cost methods to get more books into the hands of young children.

STEAM Power Your Library
Amy Koester, St. Charles City-County Library District (MO)

Want to dive deeper into STEAM programming and learn why it is so important to your patrons? This program showcases the many STEAM elements that provide a great way to offer new and engaging programs and services, while also utilizing diverse materials in the collection and fostering learning and engagement with untapped audiences. You’ll leave equipped with justification for STEAM programming, ready-to-use program ideas, and resources and tips for STEAM-powering your library.

 

Friday, September 19, 10:15 - 11:45 am

Beyond Sensory Storytime: Expanding Library Services to Children with Special Needs
Renee Grassi, Glencoe Public Library (IL)

Whether large or small, rural or urban, all library communities serve children with special needs. If your library already offers Sensory Storytime, what else can you do? Participants will learn how to assess the need for special needs services in their library communities, forge new partnerships with outside organizations, and be inspired by new and innovative programming ideas. This program will also explore strategies to reevaluate and make accommodations in existing youth programs for an inclusive audience.

Be a Winner: Inspired Youth Grant Writing
Nancy Baumann, School Librarian/Author; Lisa McClure, Hartford Public Library (CT)

Working on a shoestring to bring creative programming, authors, or resources to your library?  Applying for a grant sounds easy, but how to make your application “stand out” from the others?  Find out how youth grants differ from other grants, and what funders want.  Learn step-by-step grant writing techniques, how to match your need to a grant, and a wealth of available grant opportunities.

Inspired Collaboration: Early Childhood Partnerships
Dorothy Stoltz, Carroll County Library (MD); Nancee Dahms-Stinson, Springfield-Greene County Library (MO); Christy Estrovitz, San Francisco Public Library (CA); Betsy Diamant-Cohen, Mother Goose on the Loose LLC

Libraries are redefining their role as partners with parents and child-serving agencies to better serve children birth through five. Please join us for a panel discussion about how libraries are at the “community table” and are creating successful collaborations among early childhood allies – parents, caregivers, agencies, and, public officials. Learn how libraries are incorporating Every Child Ready to Read into partnership efforts.

Summer Lunch at the Library
Patrice Chamberlain, California Summer Meal Coalition; Natalie Cole, California Library Association; Christie Hamm, Sacramento Public Library (CA); Kari Johnson, Fresno County Public Library (CA); Amy Martin, Oakland Public Library (CA); Eva Mitnick, Los Angeles Public Library (CA)

During the summer, low-income children suffer not only from summer learning loss but also from a lack of access to nutritious food. This program demonstrates how California libraries in rural, urban and suburban communities are addressing these challenges by providing free, healthy meals for children in conjunction with their summer reading programs. You’ll gain a deeper understanding of the connection between summer nutrition and summer learning, and the opportunities this connection presents for public libraries. This program will provide information and resources you can use to plan, implement, and evaluate a successful summer lunch program.

 

Friday, September 19, 1:45 - 3:15 pm

Making Advocacy Awesome: A Workshop for the Everyday Advocate—You!
Helen Bloch, Oakland Public Library (CA); Jenna Nemec-Loise, Chicago Public Library (IL); Katie O'Dell, Multnomah County Library (OR)

If you hear “advocacy,” and think “scary,” this program is for you! Learn how you’re already an Everyday Advocate and how to maximize the rich resources available on the ALSC Everyday Advocacy website. Engage in hands-on activities and practical applications of the basics for advocating both within your library and beyond it. Come with your questions and leave with simple, effective strategies for making advocacy awesome in your library community.

Sing, Talk, Write, and Play with Math and Science
Saroj Ghoting, Early Childhood Literacy Consultant; Pamela Martin-Diáz, Allen County Public Library (IN)

Looking to incorporate updated Early Learning Standards aligned with math and science common core standards into your library’s storytime programming? Want to gain new perspectives and ideas on developing effective community partnerships? This program shows you how to highlight STEM in any storytime and ways to create opportunities for caregivers and children to explore those concepts both in and outside the library. Participants will explore how one community’s businesses and library came together to help local children get ready for school through early literacy-focused activities incorporating science and math.

Tech Access on a Budget
Cen Campbell, LittleeLit.com; Suzanne Flint, California State Library; Molly Fraker, Berkeley Public Education Fund; Mary Ann Scheuer, Berkeley Unified School District (CA); Andrea Vernola, Kalamazoo Public Library (MI)

Have you ever wanted to bring new technologies like iPads, podcasting or video editing labs to the children and teens you work with, but felt like you can’t even enter the discussion because funding is so tight? This program uses real life case studies to examine ways similarly situated libraries have brought new technologies to children and teens through different funding opportunities from. You’ll learn about different funding opportunities, how to make an effective case for tech, and most importantly, why young patrons benefit from increased access. Participants will leave with immediately implementable ideas, whether a small scale trial or a large scale grant, for increasing access to high quality media and technology on even the most daunting budget.

Thinking Outside the Storytime Box: Building your Preschool Programming Repertoire
Amy Commers, South St. Paul Public Library (MN); Melissa Depper, Arapahoe Library District (CO); Amy Koester, St. Charles City-County Library District (MO); Marge Loch-Wouters, La Crosse Public Library (WI)

Looking for literacy rich early-childhood programs that are easy, maximize staff resources, and enable you to reach more families in and out of the library? This program has everything you’re looking for, from STEM for preschoolers to dance parties for toddlers. Presenters will share program ideas, planning resources, and early literacy connections to help you leave prepared to build on the core storytime experience. You’ll learn early literacy rationales for non-storytime preschool programs, effective non-storytime programs for community outreach, and how to access and utilize online resources that maximize staff planning time.

 

Saturday, September 20, 8:00 - 9:00 am

Dewey-Lite: A Solution to the Non-Fiction Problem
Elisabeth Gattullo, Darien Public Library (CT); Kiera Parrott, School Library Journal

Frustrated with a system that separates animals on a farm from animals in the jungle but not willing to give up on Dewey just yet? The librarians at Darien Children’s Library were feeling those same frustrations, and created a hybrid model for our non-fiction collection nicknamed Dewey-Lite. This model increases the browsability of non-fiction collections while easing patron’s searching experience. It’s easy and relatively inexpensive to implement and you can, too!

Easy Programming for Discerning Tweens
Ernie Cox, College Community School District (IA); Penny Peck, San Jose State University School of Library and Information Science

Expand you programming toolbox with these field tested programs for tweens (youth ages 9-13, or grades 4-8), that take into account the unique social, emotional, and developmental needs of young adolescents. Participants will experience a range of options from one-time programs including Star Wars Reading Day, hands-on Maker programs, programs celebrating specific books, authors, or subjects, interactive movie programming, and engaging passive programming. Participants will also learn about ongoing programming series options, including stop motion animation, book discussion groups, Lego clubs, and board and video gaming.

STEAM Power Your Library
Amy Koester, St. Charles City-County Library District (MO)

Want to dive deeper into STEAM programming and learn why it is so important to your patrons? This program showcases the many STEAM elements that provide a great way to offer new and engaging programs and services, while also utilizing diverse materials in the collection and fostering learning and engagement with untapped audiences. You’ll leave equipped with justification for STEAM programming, ready-to-use program ideas, and resources and tips for STEAM-powering your library.

Using Volunteers to Build Walls
Mary Gay Ducey, Oakland Public Library (CA); Celia Jackson, Oakland Public Library (CA); Randi Voorhies, Books for Wider Horizons; Laurie Willhalm, Oakland Public Library (CA)

Learn how you can implement the Books for Wider Horizons template to expand your library storytimes’ reach while developing an involved group of early literacy volunteers. Celebrating its 20th anniversary in 2014, Oakland Public Library’s Books for Wider Horizons program, uses a volunteer-based storyreading corps to provide Head Starts and Child Development Centers in some of Oakland, CA’s most socioeconomically disadvantaged areas with vital early literacy storytime resources. Learn how to develop the infrastructure required for your own sustainable, success volunteer-based storyreading corps. You’ll receive a template for developing your own program, including how to teach book selection and complete storytime development to volunteers.

 

Saturday, September 20, 9:15 - 10:15 am

Advocating for Appropriate Technology in the Children’s Spaces

Elizabeth Gray, Yolo County Library (CA)
 
Have you ever had a parent complain about Early Literacy computers? Have you had co-workers grouse about tweens using computers for games? Are J books part of your e-book budget? Learn how to advocate for children to have access to and use the technology that is now the foundation for their learning experiences. Walk away with tips on how to bring e-books to underserved populations and how to introduce new technologies to your library community.

Every Child Ready to Read® en Español: A How-to Workshop
Lucia Gonzalez, North Miami Public Library (FL); Freda Mosquera, Broward County Library (FL); Abigail Morales, San Diego Public Library (CA); Ana-Elba Pavon, Oakland Public Library (CA); Saroj Ghoting, Early Childhood Literacy Consultant

Whether or not you are already working with your Latino community, whether or not you speak Spanish, come gain practical information on using the new tools of the Spanish ECRR Manual and kit with Latino families, exploring issues of language preferences, literature, regional diversity, and more. Benefit from practical advice to use the materials in a variety of Latino communities.

Removing Barriers to Early Literacy: Increasing Access to Books for Young Children
Stephanie Bailey-White, Idaho Commission for Libraries; Staci Shaw, Idaho Commission for Libraries; Lu Benke, University of Northern Colorado; Beth Crist, Colorado State Library; Megan Ellis, Aurora Public Library (CO); Nancy Maday, Pikes Peak Library District (CO)

The Idaho Commission for Libraries and the Colorado State Library both received IMLS National Leadership Grants to minimize barriers to library services for low-income families. Discover how to turn the findings of both projects into best practices you can use at your library to reach low-income and rural parents of 0-8 with an early literacy message and use innovative, low-cost methods to get more books into the hands of young children.

Science of Poetry
Sylvia Vardell, Texas Woman's University; Janet Wong, Author; Susan Blackaby, Poet; Margarita Engle, Poet

This session will present poetry that incorporates science content plus practical strategies for implementation. Poetry offers special language, imagery, and conciseness that introduces or reinforces important science concepts and terminology. We can encourage children to think like a poet and a scientist in carefully observing the world around them using all their senses, maintaining an avid curiosity about how things work, and gathering “big words” and key vocabulary in their reading and their writing.