ALCTS Announces Preconferences and Programs for Annual Conference 2005 in Chicago

To help attendees plan their schedules, this list is arranged by scheduled times the programs will be presented; see the ALCTS Events Schedule (in this issue) for locations of these events.

If you would like to be a reporter for one of these sessions, we’re looking for volunteers. Author an article for the August issue of ALCTS Newsletter Online!

Preconference Offerings

ALCTS is taking a new approach to preconferences this year, offering half and full day sessions on Thursday and Friday, June 23 and 24. Registrants can attend any morning session and any afternoon session—you do not have to attend morning and afternoon sessions on the same topic, although for some offerings it is recommended.

Presented by the LRTS Editorial Board. Cosponsored by the ALCTS Publications Committee.
Thursday, June 23, 2005 (8:30 am–noon and 1 pm–5:30 pm)

Attendees learn to choose a suitable medium, work out a publication time-line, understand copyright and how to negotiate a publication contract. Questions of style, grammar, working with an editor and reviewing page proofs will be addressed.

Morning Session
It Doesn’t Have To Be Research: Developing an Idea,
Timing is Everything, and
The Medium Matters.

Afternoon Session
Sweat the Details: The Nitty Gritty Makes a Difference
Know Your Rights, and
A Mystery no More.

Attendance at both sessions is not required.
Presented by the Cataloging and Classification Section. Cosponsored by the Program for Cooperative Cataloging.
Thursday, June 23, 2005 (8:30 am–noon and 1 pm–5:30 pm)

These sessions (and those on Friday) present the full set of name and title authority training materials that have been under development for the past two years by the CCS/PCC Task Force to Develop Name and Title Authority Training.

Morning Session
Authority Basics

Afternoon Session
Personal and Corporate Names

Attending all sessions in sequence is recommended.

Presented by ALCTS.
Thursday, June 23, 2005 (8:30 am–noon)
Understand the nature and scope of preservation problems and take practical steps towards improving the condition of their collections. Learn the mechanics of carrying out a condition survey, how condition information relates to preservation problems, and be provided with guidance towards tangible and cost effective improvements. Examples from studies conducted at a variety of libraries will be presented and ample time will be allowed for discussion.
Presented by ALCTS.
Thursday, June 23, 2005 (1 pm–5:30 pm)
Many folks have been reviewing and revising license agreements for several years now, but still feel uneasy about their skills. This session will quickly review the key elements of license review, identify the best resources available for help with this process, and provide a forum for questions and answers related to your own experience.
Presented by the Cataloging and Classification Section. Cosponsored by the Program for Cooperative Cataloging.
Friday, June 24, 2005 (8:30 am–noon and 1pm–5:30 pm)
These sessions (and those on Thursday) present the full set of name and title authority training materials that have been under development for the past two years by the CCS/PCC Task Force to Develop Name and Title Authority Training.

Morning Session
Meeting and Geographic Names

Afternoon Session
Uniform Title and National Issues

Attending all sessions in sequence is recommended.
Presented by ALCTS Preservation and Reformatting Section.
Friday, June 24, 2005 (8:30 am–noon and 1 pm–5:30 pm)
Library binding is a cost-effective strategy for extending the life of high-use collections, especially as publishing shifts toward more soft-cover volumes. Librarians are often faced with having to make a strong case to their administrations about the value of library binding. Participants will leave with the tools they need to make and implement informed library binding decisions.

Morning Session
Library binding products, Innovative services, standards, the decision-making process from drafting a Request For Proposal to choosing a commercial library binder, and contracts.

Afternoon Session
Binding needs and selection strategies, quality control and the tools needed to make the library binding case to administrators.

Attendance at both sessions is not required.
Presented by ALCTS.
Friday, June 24, 2005 (8:30 am–noon)
Focuses on the common need for preservation and collections maintenance within almost all institutions. More importantly, it aims to provide an introduction to the topic for new professionals/managers that suddenly find themselves in a position with responsibility for managing and preserving their library’s collections.
Presented by the ALCTS Acquisition Section’s Organization and Management Committee. Cosponsored by the Serials Section’s Acquisitions Committee, the Acquisitions Section’s Technology and Education Committee, and the Collection Management and Development Section.
Friday, June 24, 2005 (1 pm–5:30 pm)
An introduction to the history and issues of electronic resources management; a market overview of existing and developing products; reports from libraries that have implemented a system, emphasizing implementation scenarios rather than commercial products; e.g. buying a system, migrating from an in-house system to a commercial one, and using a product in parallel with a different ILS.

Program Offerings

Presented by the Preservation and Reformatting Section’s Reformatting: Analog and Digital Committee.
Saturday, June 25, 2005 (8–10 am)
In this age of ever-increasing reliance on digitization, the need to effectively manage the transition between analog and digital strategies and back again in the preservation arena is a monumental task. In this, the policy portion of a two part program, join us as we listen to discussions regarding copyright in the realm of digital preservation, the role of the original artifact and business models to support both approaches.
Presented by the Catalog and Classification Section’s Committee on Cataloging: Description and Access. Cosponsored by Collaborative Digitization Program.
Saturday, June 25, 2005 (8:30 am–noon)
This program introduces librarians to the Visual Resource Association’s new guide to cataloging cultural materials and their digital surrogates. It addresses the need of librarians, archivists and museums for a shared metadata content standard to a broad range of cultural materials such as paintings, photographs, architecture and analogous objects.
Presented by the ALCTS Leadership Development Committee.
Saturday, June 25, 2005 (10:30 am–noon)
The workforce at the beginning of the 21st century is comprised of four generations. Each group has its own set of values, perspectives, and personal experiences. What similarities or differences exist among the various groups?
Presented by the ALCTS Preservation and Reformatting Section.
Saturday, June 25, 2005 (10:30 am–noon)
Preservation education is a critical need for librarians and archivists, particularly as the scope of their preservation responsibilities continues to widen to include new formats and as the library and archival community continues its commitment to building digital libraries of historically and culturally significant material. The presentation will focus on survey results and research aiming to obtain a more complete picture of the present course offerings in preservation, for the purposes of testing the hypothesis that current preservation education does not provide adequate preparation in the areas of technical and managerial expertise to deal with the preservation of material.
Presented by the Serials Section’s Acquisitions Committee. Cosponsored by the Serials Section’s Education Committee, the Acquisitions Section’s Acquisition, Organization and Management Committee, and the Serials Section’s Electronic Resources Interest Group.
Saturday, June 25, 2005 (1:30 pm–3:30 pm)
Come and hear about workflow innovations created by acquisitions, cataloging, serials and information technology departments to meet the needs of their libraries created by the new e-resources available in the market place. Librarians have had to make changes to the way their staff and their technologies are used to make the workflow in their departments work better to supply service and information to faculty and users about new titles and e-resources. We have four innovators discussing the new structure in their departments to handle the new information flow created by e-resources and ejournals.
Presented by the Preservation and Reformatting Section’s Reformatting: Analog and Digital Committee.
Sunday, June 26, 2005 (8 am–10 am)
In this age of ever-increasing reliance on digitization, the need to effectively manage the transition between analog and digital strategies and back again in the preservation arena is a monumental task. In this, the technology portion of a two part program, join us as we listen to discussions regarding current video reformatting options, a state of the industry report on 35mm microfilm and an update on a cutting edge trusted digital repository.
Presented by the Cataloging and Classification Section’s Committee on Cataloging: Description and Access. Cosponsored by ALCTS/LITA/RUSA Machine-Readable Bibliographic Information Committee (MARBI)
Sunday, June 26, 2005 (8:30 am–noon)
AACR3 is coming! The new edition of the cataloging rules is being prepared for publication in 2007. Panelists actively engaged in the development of the new edition will give presentations on the changes planned for the rules, the potential impact on cataloging and other metadata operations, and the anticipated benefits for end users.
Presented by the Catalog and Classification Section’s Cataloging of Children’s Materials Committee.
Sunday, June 26, 2005 (1:30 pm–3:30 pm)
School library catalogs—do they magically create themselves? Of course not. School librarians need to be able to create accurate, informative catalog records that conform to national standards. Even when catalog data is purchased from a vendor, the librarian needs to be able to speak MARC in order to create intelligent profiles with bibliographic and system vendors. This session will be an opportunity for participants both to review children's cataloging with leaders in the field, and to make those leaders aware of their questions and needs for training.
Presented by the ALCTS Collection Management and Development Section.
Sunday, June 26, 2005 (1:30 pm–3:30 pm)
The program will present a moderated panel discussion to explore the ways the development of print collections has changed as a result of libraries pursuit of e-resources, the implications of these changes, and ways libraries are working to mitigate any negative effects of this shift. Additional topics to be included in the discussion are the impact of off-site (shared or not) repositories, and archiving.
Presented by the ALCTS Acquisitions Section. Cosponsored by the Serials Section’s Research and Publications Committee, the Catalog and Classification Section’s Research and Publications Committee, and the ACRL Research Committee.
Sunday, June 26, 2005 (1:30 pm–5:30 pm)
Johnnie and Jane (librarians) gained a better understanding of research basics from the ALCTS program, “Why Can’t Johnnie and Jane Get Published, Research Basics,” held in Toronto in June 2003 and are ready to conduct their first research project. Led by a panel of experts, this program will provide an overview of format of a research paper, in-depth presentations and discussions on selecting appropriate research methodologies to carry out the project, data collection procedures, presentation of analysis, and get the research findings published in a referred journal. This is an interactive program. The audience will have opportunities to interact with the panel and with other participants through group discussions and Q&A sessions.
Presented by the ALCTS Preservation and Reformatting Section.
Sunday, June 26, 2005 (4 pm–5:30 pm)
While many cultural heritage institutions with extensive audio collections are coming to grips with the issues surrounding their potential demise and needs regarding preservation, institutions with more limited collections of audio are still largely unaware of these issues. Public libraries and other smaller institutions whose main focus is not collecting audio nevertheless hold collections of recorded oral histories or unique unpublished musical recordings. In this session our goal is to make libraries, archives, museums and other cultural heritage institutions aware of the need to preserve their audio holdings by providing an overview of the issues, types of audio media, and their patterns of deterioration.
Presented by the Serials Section’s Education Committee. Cosponsored by the Acquisitions Section’s Education Committee and the Serials Section’s Acquisitions Committee.
Monday, June 27, 2005 (8 am–10 am)
This program will feature a panel of three notable and expert speakers who have worked in libraries and/or information industry firms. Their presentations will explain that librarians take substantial risks and in effect lend money to commercial organizations when they pay in advance for subscriptions or services. Questions to ask vendors, as well as guidelines and strategies to follow in assessing vendor financial viability will be presented.
Monday, June 27, 2005 (10:30 am–noon)
Michael Hawley, extraordinary innovator, educator, and explorer, is the featured speaker for the 2005 President’s Program. Karen Calhoun, Cornell University, addresses the changing context for librarians in the interconnected world of the Web.
Presented by the Catalog and Classification Section’s Executive Committee. Cosponsored by the ALCTS Networked Resources and Metadata Interest Group, the LITA Digital Library Technologies Interest Group, the LITA MARC Formats Interest Group, and NISO.
Monday, June 27, 2005 (1:30 pm–-5:30 pm)
Libraries face challenges in integrating descriptive metadata for electronic resources with traditional cataloging data. This program will address the repurposing of MARC data and metadata interoperability in a broader context. It will then introduce the Library of Congress’ Metadata Object Description Schema (MODS) and present specific project applications of MODS. Finally, the program will offer scenarios for coordinating MARC and non-MARC metadata processes in an integrated metadata management design and introduce tools for simplifying interoperability.
Presented by the ALCTS Collection Management and Development Section.
Monday, June 27, 2005 (1:30 pm–5:30 pm)
Metrics for evaluating the use of electronic resources are developing but this development is uneven at best. This program will look at the standards that have been established as well as review how these standards have been implemented in the field.