ACRL 2012 Spring Virtual Institute Webcasts

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

1:00 -2:00 p.m. Central (Two paired webcasts)

Read Smart: A Successful Book Discussion Series Where Town Meets Gown
Learn how an academic library and a public library collaborated to develop a book discussion series that can serve as a test case for successful audience development, marketing, and assessment on a limited budget.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Learn how to define partner roles and responsibilities in order to avoid common pitfalls of collaboration.
  • Define the concept of branding in order to begin a cost-effective marketing plan for programs.
  • Critically examine a collaborative program and analyze its strengths and weaknesses in order to evaluate it as a model for application in your own setting.

Presenter(s): Marian Fragola, Director, Program Planning and Outreach, NCSU Libraries, NC State University; Jean Ells, Regional Library Manager, Wake County Public Libraries

Gown Meets Town: the One Book One New Paltz Common Read Program
The “One Book One City” community reading initiative is now a worldwide phenomenon, with hundreds of One Book programs sponsoring cultural events each year in the United States alone. While academic libraries and librarians have long recognized the role of community reading programs as tools for intellectual and personal development, sponsorship of these programs has mostly been limited to the public library sector.  However, colleges and universities have recently begun to introduce common reading initiatives as part of the first-year freshman experience.  These “common reads” promote lifelong learning competencies and interdisciplinary exploration between students, faculty, and the academic community.  This presentation will explore the joint One Book/Common Read program at the State University of New York at New Paltz , highlighting the impact of community reading initiatives on information literacy programming.  Through case studies and literature review, participants will examine program development, selection criteria, and assessment methods.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Explore scope and characteristics of community and academic reading initiatives using case studies and literature review.
  • Evaluate the role of joint community/academic reading initiatives in information literacy programming
  • Discussion of program goals, selection criteria, community/academic calendars, promotional guidelines, and target audience

Presenter(s): Lauren Marcus, Reference & Instruction Librarian, Sojourner Truth Library  State University of New York at New Paltz

1:00 -2:00 p.m. Central (Two paired webcasts)

Concerts and Dances in an Library? An Undergraduate Library as Campus Cultural Space
Programming in an academic library! Describes the long-running UCLA Powell Library "Music in the Rotunda" concert and "Historical Dance in the Rotunda" series, as examples of a collaborations with music departments and student campus organizations. Perhaps your library can become a campus cultural center (on a shoestring) too!

Learning Outcomes:

  • Participants will be given the opportunity to think about cultural collaboration possibilities on their own campuses which allows the campus to view the library in a positive new way.
  • Participants will see the variety of collaborations that are possible with campus departments and other contributors.
  • Participants will obtain events publicity ideas that have worked over time.

Presenter(s): Catherine M. Brown, Reference Collection, Exhibits and Events Coordinator, UCLA College Library

Out of the Stacks and Into the Clubs: Student Organizations, Liaisons, and Library Outreach & Instruction
Academic libraries are always looking for ways to reach students. At the University of Florida and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, librarians tested working with student organizations.  This presentation aims to discuss similar ways to reach students. Questions about such programs include what student organizations should be included, how should librarians use their time at such organizational events, and how should libraries as administrative organizations fit into this equation?  Other academic, college, and research libraries should explore these and other options to increase outreach, help students in new ways, and increase their visibility within their institution.

Learning Outcomes:

  • See beyond traditional roles of librarians in research or college libraries as Subject Liaisons in order to expand outreach opportunities.
  • Inspire libraries and librarians to come up with programs that increase student participation and involvement in order to cultivate an academic and welcoming environment.
  • Inspire libraries and librarians to create programs involved with institutional organizations that have yet to be fully taken advantage of on their campus in order to increase library visibility.

Presenter(s): William (Bill) Friedman, Research & Instructional Services Librarian, Gorgas Library, The University of Alabama

3:00 – 3:45 p.m. Central

Undergraduate Research Programs and the Academic Library: How Partnership Creates Successful Research Experiences
Undergraduate research (UR) programs attract highly motivated students who often continue on to graduate/professional schools but may lack necessary information literacy skills.  Collaboration with UR programs provides librarians new opportunities to help students develop these skills and work with specialized collections in the context of a research experience.  In this webinar, librarians and UR administrators share their experiences in forging collaborations based on UR and library training resources, explain how information literacy skills programming has been embedded into UR, and demonstrate how this partnership has led to greater visibility of library services, collections and UR among all undergraduates.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Define and develop strategies for collaboration with undergraduate research programs or initiatives.
  • Identify opportunities to embed information literacy programming and the use of special research collections in undergraduate research experiences.
  • Identify marketing opportunities with undergraduate research to strengthen the library’s instruction program, and increase visibility among undergraduate researchers of library resources, services, and librarians.

Presenter(s): Nancy A. Cunningham, Director of Academic Services, University of South Florida  Tampa Library; Drew Smith, Assistant Librarian, University of South Florida; Dr. Rick Pollenz, Director of the Office for Undergraduate Research, University of South Florida; Dr. Mark Greenberg, Director of Special & Digital Collections, University of South Florida

3:00 – 3:45 p.m. Central

Reaching beyond Academe – Library Outreach to Rural Communities
Economic gardening stresses finding local solutions to solving economic development issues. Academic libraries can participate by offering expertise and leading collaborative endeavors with external organizations like rural affairs institutes and state library systems to introduce economic gardening concepts and practices to libraries and historical societies to stimulate local economic development. This panel presentation introduces best practices for training academic librarians to become integral partners in community and economic development. The discussions will enable those interested to “tell their stories” in establishing a library-based context for economic development in their communities, whether rural, urban, or suburban.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Tools to train librarians to participate in community economic development and best practices to foster entreprenuerial development.
  • How to build rural community pride through teaching historic preservation techniques, digitization, citizen journalism, and dissemination.
  • Identify drivers and barriers that will lead to success for collaboration.

Presenter(s): Dr. Jeff Hancks, Associate Professor of Libraries, Western Illinois University Libraries;  Dr. Felix Chu, Interim Associate Dean, Western Illinois University; Dr. Timothy Collins, Assistant Director, Illinois Institute for Rural Affairs; Ms. Linda Zellmer, Assistant Professor, Western Illinois University Libraries; Mr. Sean Cordes, Associate Professor, Western Illinois University Libraries

Thursday, April 19, 2012

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Central (Two paired webcasts)

The Missing Piece: Providing Outreach and Services to Staff Members
Many academic library mission statements include the phrase, “students, faculty, and staff,” but how active are we really at reaching out to non-library staff members?  Libraries spend a lot of time and resources marketing to students and faculty, but the staff component of our missions can sometimes be overlooked. This presentation will describe three innovative methods that we are currently using to increase staff awareness of the library’s resources and services as well as to increase staff use of the library for personal use and professional development.  Participants will leave with examples of strategies and best practices to engage staff members that they can easily adapt to implement at their institutions.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Be able to identify three innovative methods for outreach to non-library staff members
  • Be able to reflect on their mission statements to determine if all components are being addressed
  • Be able to apply variations of the methods discussed to implement at their institutions.

Presenter(s): Jennifer Castaldo, Distance Education Librarian, Johns Hopkins University

Study Skills for Success: Extending Librarians’ Impact with Continuing Education Students
Due to factors including cultural differences, lack of experience in higher education, and pressures in personal life, many adult learners in continuing education programs require support to develop the academic skills needed to succeed in their studies. Find out how librarians can broaden their outreach by collaborating with continuing education programs to deliver “study skills” workshops targeted at these unique learners.    Through presentation of a case study and audience-driven discussion, participants will explore the process of developing specialized study skills workshops. Be prepared to expand your thinking about how librarians can take a holistic approach to supporting their constituencies’ academic skills.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Participants will describe the process of developing a specialized workshop to address academic skills training needs.
  • Participants will recognize continuing education students’ needs for academic skills training in order to develop programs that support their studies.
  • Participants will identify alternate types of instruction that librarians can offer in order to meet the specific learning needs of their constituencies.

Presenter(s): Robin Canuel, Liaison Librarian, McGill University; Megan Fitzgibbons, Liaison Librarian, McGill University; Jessica Lange, Liaison Librarian, McGill University

11:00 – 11:45 a.m. Central

eScience Initiatives in Higher Education: International Perspective
eScience has the potential to significantly enhance the social and economic advances of developing nations.  The purpose of the interactive webcast is to stimulate ideas and creative strategies for academic libraries to actively engage in the implementation, development, or enhancement of eScience initiatives within their community.  Participants will learn more about how STEM academic libraries within the United Arab Emirates are playing an integral role in the development of eScience within the region.  Overall, librarians will learn more about eScience initiatives from an international perspective, as well as how they might be able to incorporate these ideas within their local environment.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Identify strategies to foster eScience initiatives within the context of their local environment
  • Participants will reflect on current eScience best practices within a national and international context
  • Discuss the similarities and differences between eScience initiatives within US and abroad

Presenter(s): Vanessa Middleton, Acting Head Librarian, Petroleum Institute; Dorothy F. Byers, Library Director, Khalifa University of Science & Technology

1:00 – 1:45 p.m. Central

Workshop:  Toolkit for a Collaborative Dissertation Writing Group
The library is committed to pursuing the value of excellence in relation to the education of students.  Part of this commitment means determining how to provide support to students, and the library recognizes that this entailed taking an alternative approach to providing support, especially in the case of their Ph.D students. Discover how the librarians are providing support to graduate students by collaborating with non-library departments. In this webcast, attendants will learn the benefits of implementing a Dissertation Writing Group, as well as how to develop and implement such a program in their institution.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Identify potential positive impact on students when libraries collaborate with other departments on campus
  • Determine the resources needed for implementing collaborative programs
  • Outline the purpose of  a Dissertation Writing Group./ Outcome Four: Provide strategies for determining the need for such a program on campus

Presenter(s): Anna Stoute, Head of Education and Outreach, University of Miami; April Mann,Writing Center Director,University of Miami; Koren A. Bedeau, Ph.D.,Assistant Dean ,University of Miami Graduate School

1:00 – 1:45 p.m. Central

Teaching a credit library instruction course to student athletes: A collaborative experience
Participants will learn about the unique challenges and rewards of teaching an information literacy course to student athletes. The presenters will share their experiences developing a relationship with the Athletics Department and developing a course that meets the special needs of student athletes. The use of technology to enhance student outcomes will also be discussed.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Learn about the unique challenges and rewards of teaching student athletes
  • Learn how to reach out and start an information literacy program with your own athletics department
  • Learn about the current integration of technology within a credit library course

Presenter(s): Kiersten Cox, Instructor, School of Information, University of South Florida; Julius Fleischner, Reference and Instruction Librarian, Briar Cliff University

2:45 - 3:30 p.m. Central

Proactively Preventing Plagiarism: How a Library Workshop Affects the Campus Culture
During this session, participants will learn how two academic librarians created a plagiarism prevention workshop that affected the entire campus by prompting a different campus culture that proactively prevents plagiarism rather than reactively punish violators.    The workshop helps students define plagiarism, describe its importance, avoid plagiarizing, and use paraphrasing properly. The three plagiarism workshops are a face-to-face workshop, a Blackboard workshop for distance education students, and a remedial workshop. This semester, we created an advanced workshop for upper level classes. By attending our session, attendees will learn about workshop structure and the process of creating the different plagiarism workshops.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Examine plagiarism prevention techniques and workshop content to be able to implement plagiarism prevention strategies.
  • Discover ways to encourage collaboration in order to work with others on projects beneficial to the entire campus.
  • Think innovatively and generate ideas in order to solve information literacy problems.

Presenter(s): Breanne Kirsch, Evening Public Services Librarian, University of South Carolina Upstate; Lola Bradley- Reference Librarian, University of South Carolina Upstate

2:45 - 3:30 p.m. Central

Doing and Teaching History at The New York Public Library
Our project explores how this unique collaboration between a public research library and a history department in a university can improve students’ research, creative, analytical and critical thinking skills; we also will focus on the types of information literacy skills students can gain from being exposed to the NYPL and the best practices that can be employed to encourage student researchers, particularly in the undergraduate level. In addition, we will discuss how to get other faculty members involved in the project.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Learning how to collaborate between University and Public Library
  • Learning how to outreach to students and faculty.
  • Understanding the role of information literacy in this partnership: historical and literary research, digital humanities and critical thinking skills.

Presenter(s): Raymond Pun, Librarian, The New York Public Library: Stephen A. Schwarzman Building; Elaine Carey, Associate Professor and Interim Chair of History


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