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Owning and Using Scholarship: An IP Handbook for Teachers and Researchers (PDF 2,297 KB)
Kevin L. Smith, J.D.
Copyright and other types of laws regulating intellectual property create an increasing concern for contemporary scholarship. The digital environment has created exciting new opportunities and possibilities for scholars to work and distribute their work. But these new opportunities also create issues that did not arise in the analog world. Owning and Using Scholarship: An IP Handbook for Teachers and Researchers attempts to demystify intellectual property, and especially copyright law, for academic authors and independent scholars who face these dilemmas. It also can serve as a comprehensive resource for librarians who are asked to assist with these new and challenging decisions. Throughout the book a clear explanation of the law is coupled with concrete examples drawn from actual issues encountered by scholars. This balance of theoretical background and practical application is designed to appeal to both those who want a quick discussion of potential approaches and those who prefer to know “why.” In addition to applying this approach to copyright issues that arise for research and teaching, the volume also discusses the options and obstacles that confront authors wishing to publish their work in new environment. Explanations and objective assessments of the different options available for disseminating scholarship are provided to assist authors and other creators in making their own decisions about the best choice for them.

Common Ground at the Nexus of Information Literacy and Scholarly Communication (PDF 2,541 KB)
Edited by Stephanie Davis-Kahl and Merinda Kaye Hensley Common Ground at the Nexus of Information Literacy and Scholarly Communication forges a new path that crosses boundaries between two vital areas of librarianship.  The book explores how librarians at a variety of institutions can engage students and faculty in discussing topics such as open access, copyright, fair use, publishing models, the social and economic aspects of scholarship and publishing through the lens of information literacy.  Readers will come away with new ideas for forging partnerships with others in their organizations in order to enrich both information literacy and scholarly communication programs, activities and services. The seventeen chapters in this volume represent the diversity and creativity in librarianship and aims to spark conversations about how to approach these topics using the case studies and interviews about programming, advocacy, outreach and instruction. In keeping with the scholarly communication principles discussed in this title, ACRL is also making available an Open Access (OA) Edition. This Edition is a variant edition in that it is lacking one of the chapters present in the original print and e-book full editions. 

The Kaleidoscopic Concern (PDF 2,023 KB)
This annotated bibliography on racial and ethnic diversity in librarianship by Kaetrena D. Davis-Kendrick includes new areas of study such as gender issues and white privilege with regard to racial minority and ethnic librarians. It covers the concerns, goals and strategies surrounding the recruitment, retention, and advancement of librarians of color and contains over 80 years of the profession’s earliest training initiatives and current best practices. Also traced in this bibliography is the evolution of the specific idea of affirmative action to the more nebulous concept of diversity in libraries. Books and book chapters, dissertations and theses, articles, poster sessions, presentations, reports from professional library associations and consortia, and multimedia objects are annotated in here.

Informing Innovation: Tracking Student Interest in Emerging Library Technologies at Ohio University (A Research Report) (PDF 3,854 KB) 
This book by Char Booth examines one institution’s efforts to move away from technolust and towards a “culture of assessment." It presents findings from an environmental scan conducted at Ohio University, which investigated the convergence of students, libraries, and emerging information, communication, and academic tools. Survey data is used to test generational and demographic assumptions that often guide technology development in academic libraries. The identification of student behaviors related to emerging and social technologies and the implications indicated by those behaviors are central to this study. The need for local user assessment is a fundamental message in this volume, which shares practical research strategies and methods with the reader. University and college libraries can use this case study and its appended survey instrument template to conduct similar investigations on their campuses. (Also available from the ALA Book Store.)

    • Informing Innovation: Survey Instrument (PDF 268 KB)
      Download a template library/technology survey instrument, which can be adapted to customize a local environmental scan similar to the Ohio University Libraries project.
    • Informing Innovation: Package download (PDF 3,937 KB)
      This "package" download breaks the report into separate PDF files, useful for readers interested in selectively reading findings and appendices.
    • Dynamic Webcast (Flash Video - Streaming)
      View a dynamic webcast of Char Booth and Chris Guder's 2009 ACRL National Conference presentation, "If You Build It, Will They Care?", which summarizes findings and practical applications of the Ohio University Libraries student environmental scanning project.

Studying Students: The Undergraduate Research Project at the University of Rochester (PDF 2,643 KB)
This book provides a view into the groundbreaking application of ethnographic tools and techniques to the understanding of undergraduate students and their use of information. The publication describes findings of the work at the University of Rochester River Campus Libraries and provides insight into how academic librarians might use these techniques on their own campuses.  

A Guide for Writing CMC Collection Development Policies (PDF 637 KB)
Since the second edition of the "Curriculum Materials Center Collection Development Policy" was published in 1993, technology has become an ever-present force in the areas of library collections and teaching and learning delivery methods. This new document attempts to meld traditional collection development policy requirements with the challenges of new technologies and collection formats. It was designed to help CMC librarians define their own collection development programs, and to provide guidance to staff employed in these centers for building and maintaining their collections. The outline is meant to give prompts for areas that may need to be addressed in a CMC collection development policy, with sample language after each prompt and also within the sample policy at the end. Lists of selection criteria and "points to ponder" when writing a policy have been included. The format is intended to be easily adaptable by any higher education institution to meet local needs and to be inclusive in order to accommodate all types of curriculum centers and collections. Local policy may dictate more or less specificity, and may require more prescriptive language than is used in this document.

Your Old Books (PDF 1,644 KB)
This guide addresses some frequently asked questions about rare and older books and their values. The answers are meant only as general responses to these questions, and many possible exceptions are not described. No attempt has been made to identify or to evaluate individual books, nor does RBMS have the resources to respond to such requests. The appendix lists online and print resources for more information on the questions covered. This publication was made possible through the generous support of ABAA and the Rare Books School at the University of Virginia.

Global Evolution (PDF 1,370 KB)
ACRL is proud to offer Global Evolution: A Chronological Annotated Bibliography of International Students in U.S. Academic Libraries by Kaetrena D. Davis, as both a print publication and an online, downloadable publication. This slim booklet is a chronological, annotated bibliography that shows the evolution of the issues concerning undergraduate and graduate international students in American academic libraries and contains many possible guidelines and ideas for meeting the basic and advanced information needs of an increasingly diverse patron group. From library orientation and information literacy to programming and outreach, the gathered information covers over forty years of articles, dissertations, theses, book chapters, books, other bibliographies, and even multimedia. (Also available from the ALA Book Store)