Hidden Architectures in Information Literacy: A Three-Part Webcast Series

Tuesday, 7/21/2020
  • 2:00 PM-3:00 PM (Eastern)
  • 1:00 PM-2:00 PM (Central)
  • 12:00 PM-1:00 PM (Mountain)
  • 11:00 AM-12:00 PM (Pacific)
Tuesday, 7/28/2020
  • 2:00 PM-3:00 PM (Eastern)
  • 1:00 PM-2:00 PM (Central)
  • 12:00 PM-1:00 PM (Mountain)
  • 11:00 AM-12:00 PM (Pacific)
Tuesday, 8/4/2020
  • 2:00 PM-3:00 PM (Eastern)
  • 1:00 PM-2:00 PM (Central)
  • 12:00 PM-1:00 PM (Mountain)
  • 11:00 AM-12:00 PM (Pacific)

Information literacy is a well-established goal of academic libraries, yet so much of the day-to-day work of running and coordinating information literacy programs is absent from professional literature, job descriptions, and library school coursework. While the definition of a program is a coordinated set of activities in service of a specific purpose, what those activities actually consist of - and who is responsible for them - is highly dependent on institutional and interpersonal contexts. This three-part webcast series will make visible the structures, practices, and contexts of information literacy programs in academic libraries.

Part One

This webcast is the first of three exploring themes in the new ACRL edited volume Hidden Architectures: Structures, Practices, and Contexts (Gardner, Galoozis, and Halpern), each moderated by one co-editor. In this webcast, “Program Goals and Structures,” moderated by co-editor Elizabeth Galoozis, three presenters will describe and analyze their information literacy programs’ goals and structures in relation to their institutional contexts: Andrea Brooks at Northern Kentucky University (a stand-alone information literacy department), Elizabeth Galoozis at University of Southern California (a traditional liaison-based program), and Gina Kessler Lee at Saint Mary’s College of California (a small team with multiple roles). They will also examine the ways in which their programs have evolved and changed in the wake of the pandemic and all of the changes it has brought. Throughout, participants will reflect on and respond to prompts that help them to think through their own information literacy programs’ goals and structures, and how they might evolve and adapt.

Part Two

This webcast is the second of three exploring themes in the new ACRL edited volume Hidden Architectures: Structures, Practices, and Contexts (Gardner, Galoozis, and Halpern), each moderated by one co-editor. In this webcast, “Leading & Managing Information Literacy Programs,” three presenters will discuss and analyze leadership and management in their respective information literacy programs: Veronica Arellano Douglas at University of Houston, Yvonne Muelmans at California State University San Marcos, and Michael LaMagna at Delaware County Community College. The panel, moderated by Carolyn Caffrey Gardner at California State University, Dominguez Hills, will share their experiences with: negotiating learning outcomes and best practices with faculty members outside of the library; communication practices that take into account power discrepancies; power dynamics between librarians and course instructors; and practicing care for librarians on your team through modeling and advocacy. Throughout, participants will reflect and respond to prompts that help them to think through their own information literacy programs and how they might evolve and adapt.

Part Three

This webcast is the third of three exploring themes in the new ACRL edited volume Hidden Architectures: Structures, Practices, and Contexts (Gardner, Galoozis, and Halpern), each moderated by one co-editor. In this webcast, “Collaboration in Information Literacy Programs,” three presenters will discuss and analyze collaborative partnerships in their respective information literacy programs: Becky Canovan at the University of Dubuque, Carolyn Caffrey Gardner at California State University, Dominguez Hills, and Liza Harringon at Greenfield Community College. The panel, moderated by Rebecca Halpern of The Claremont Colleges, will share strategies and approaches to collaborating with departments and programs inside and outside the library, including the negotiation and creation of shared goals and vocabularies. Throughout, participants will reflect and respond to prompts that help them to think through their own information literacy programs’ collaborations, and how they might evolve and adapt.

Learning Outcomes

Part One

  • Articulate the goals of an existing or potential information literacy program
  • Examine the relationship of information literacy program structures to their institutional contexts
  • Analyze the goals and structure of an existing or potential information literacy program in order to align them

Part Two

  • Identify differing information literacy program leadership and management strategies
  • Examine practices for setting boundaries and negotiating best practices with information literacy stakeholders, including non-library faculty
  • Explore how power is distributed, shared, and managed in order to facilitate equitable instruction program development

Part Three

  • Identify potential campus partners in order to integrate information literacy into larger curricular contexts
  • Articulate best practices for successful information literacy-related collaboration in order to begin relationship-building
  • Prepare and plan for challenges to collaboration in order to ensure sustainable partnerships

Who Should Attend

Part One

  • Information literacy program coordinators who want to take a fresh look at the goals and/or structures of their programs
  • Anyone considering a position as an information literacy program coordinator or instruction librarian who wants to get a sense of how programs are structured
  • Anyone who wants to better understand information literacy programs, including library administrators or faculty and staff outside the library

Part Two

  • Identify differing information literacy program leadership and management strategies
  • Examine practices for setting boundaries and negotiating best practices with information literacy stakeholders, including non-library faculty
  • Explore how power is distributed, shared, and managed in order to facilitate equitable instruction program development

Part Three

  • Information literacy coordinators who are interested in building relationships with campus partners but don’t know where to start
  • Information literacy coordinators who already have collaborations but are interested in expanding them or making them more sustainable
  • Anyone interested in information literacy collaboration, including library administrators or faculty and staff outside the library

Panelists

Part One

  • Andrea Brooks coordinates the information literacy instruction program at Northern Kentucky University’s Steely Library, a position she’s held since 2014.  She also co-chairs the implementation team for the campus’ Quality Enhancement Plan, titled GEARUP with Information Literacy.  Andrea earned her MLIS from Kent State University and an MA in Communication from NKU.  Her recent research interests include the role of information literacy for non-teaching librarians and assessing online IL modules.  She’s an active member of the Kentucky Library Association, and she’s the proud mom of three boisterous children.
  • Gina Kessler Lee (she/her) is an associate librarian at Saint Mary's College of California, a liberal arts, Catholic, and Lasallian institution. She serves as the library's Instruction and Outreach Coordinator and as the subject librarian for English. She was recently appointed to ACRL’s Student Learning and Information Literacy Committee and has served as chair of the California Conference on Library Instruction. Her current research focuses on teaching information literacy in the context of a writing-about-writing approach to composition. She received her MLIS from the University of Washington.
  • Elizabeth Galoozis is a co-editor, along with Carolyn Caffrey Gardner and Rebecca Halpern, of Hidden Architectures: Structures, Practices, and Contexts. She is Head of Information Literacy at the University of Southern California Libraries, where she focuses on integrating information literacy throughout the curriculum. Her research interests include critical information literacy, feminist pedagogy, and identity in the library workplace. She has published work in College & Research Libraries, The Library Quarterly, and Library Juice Press.

Part Two

  • Veronica Arellano Douglas is Instruction Coordinator at the University of Houston Libraries. She received her MLS from the University of North Texas and BA in English from Rice University. Veronica is a 2006 ALA Spectrum Scholar and current ARL LCDP Fellow. Her research interests focus on critical information literacy, relational-cultural theory, and feminist practice in librarianship.
  • Yvonne Nalani Meulemans is Head of Teaching and Learning at the University Library. She joined CSUSM in 2002 as a Senior Assistant Librarian/Science Librarian. She earned tenure and promotion to Associate Librarian 2008 and promotion to Librarian in 2014. In her role as Head of Teaching and Learning, Ms. Meulemans leads a team of library faculty and staff that partners with the campus community to encourage and support research, curiosity, and inquiry. She has published and presented on issues related to information literacy including using social media in academic libraries, building partnerships with faculty, and pedagogical approaches to providing reference and research help.  Most recently, she has focused her research efforts on using the threshold concepts framework as a tool for students’ reflective practice and the potential of servant leadership theory in academic library leadership.
  • Michael LaMagna is the Information Literacy Program and Library Services Coordinator at Delaware County Community College. In addition to this role, Michael  is an Associate Professor and Reference Librarian with library liaison responsibilities to the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics division. Michael presents and writes on information literacy pedagogy, synchronous instruction, digital badges, ebooks, and open educational resources. His work has appeared in Collection and Curation, Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship, Internet Reference Services Quarterly, and the Journal of Access Services. Michael received his EdD in Higher Education Administration from Northeastern University, Master of Library Science from St. John’s University, Master of Arts in History from Villanova University, and Bachelor of Arts in History from Susquehanna University.
  • Carolyn Caffrey Gardner is the Information Literacy Coordinator at California State University, Dominguez Hills. After completing her MLS from Indiana University Bloomington, she worked as an instruction librarian at University of Wisconsin–Superior and then University of Southern California, where she focused on the intersections of first-year writing programs and information literacy instruction. Her work on critical pedagogy and assessment, peer-to-peer scholarly resource sharing, and information literacy has appeared in Reference Services Review, The Library Quarterly, and College & Research Libraries.

Part Three

  • Becky Canovan coordinates and is an active participant in both the information literacy and reference teams as the Assistant Director of Public Services at the University of Dubuque in Iowa. She co-leads an annual statewide IL-focused professional development workshop. She also scratches her creative itch by designing and installing themed displays and doing reader’s advisory at her library.
  • Carolyn Caffrey Gardner is the Information Literacy Coordinator at California State University, Dominguez Hills. After completing her MLS from Indiana University Bloomington, she worked as an instruction librarian at University of Wisconsin–Superior and then University of Southern California, where she focused on the intersections of first-year writing programs and information literacy instruction. Her work on critical pedagogy and assessment, peer-to-peer scholarly resource sharing, and information literacy has appeared in Reference Services Review, The Library Quarterly, and College & Research Libraries.
  • Liza Harrington is the Coordinator of Library Services at Greenfield Community College,having been hired as a librarian in 2011. Her primary responsibilities are around reference and instruction, but she also coordinates the information literacy program and serves on a variety of college-wide committees and initiatives, including co-chairing the college’s 2020 accreditation self-study process. She has an MSLIS from Simmons College, participated in the ACRL Immersion Program Teacher Track in July 2012, and was in the first cohort of the ACRL Assessment in Action program in 2014. She also serves on a variety of ACRL committees.
  • Rebecca Halpern is the Undergraduate Engagement Team Leader at The Claremont Colleges Library. After spending several years as a subject librarian at The University of Southern California, Rebecca wanted to use her facilitation, strategic planning, and teaching skills to coordinate an instruction program. At The Claremont Colleges, she supervises a team of teaching librarians and oversees the first-year instruction and outreach programs. Her research interests are in antiracist pedagogy and management, critical librarianship, and ethnographic methodologies.

Registration

Cost

Save money and register for the full three-part webcast series!

FULL SERIES
ACRL member: $130
ALA member: $200
Nonmember: $230
Student: $100
Group*: $595

INDIVIDUAL WEBCAST
ACRL member: $50
ALA member: $75
Nonmember: $90
Student: $40
Group*: $295

*DURING THIS TIME OF COVID-19 RELATED LIBRARY CLOSURES: For purposes of group registration, ACRL will define a group as up to 30 individuals from a single institution working remotely and logging in individually from multiple locations to participate in the live webcast. Also, group registration includes access to the archived recording for one year for unlimited staff at a registered institution.

How to Register

Register for the full series

  • Locate the webcast series under the July 2020 header ("Hidden Architectures in Information Literacy - A Three-Part")
  • Select the "Register" link next to the webcast series title.
  • You will need to log in with your ALA ID & password. If you do not have an ALA ID & password, you will be asked to create one in order to register.

Register for an individual webcast(s)

  • Locate the webcast by the date of the event under the July or August 2020 heading.
  • Select the "Register" link next to the webcast title.
  • You will need to log in with your ALA ID & password. If you do not have an ALA ID & password, you will be asked to create one in order to register.

Tech Requirements

ACRL Webcasts are held in an Adobe Connect virtual classroom. Speakers or a headset for listening to the presentation are required. You may interact with the presenter and ask questions through text-based chat.  Adobe works on both PC and Apple platforms.

The webcast will be recorded and the link to the recording will be shared shortly after the live event.

Contact

If you have a question about an e-Learning opportunity or need to make arrangements for special assistance, please contact Margot Conahan (mconahan@ala.org).