Collaborating for Impact: Special Collections and Liaison Librarian Partnerships Webcast Series

Tuesday, 11/1/2016
  • 2:00 PM-3:00 PM (Eastern)
  • 1:00 PM-2:00 PM (Central)
  • 12:00 PM-1:00 PM (Mountain)
  • 11:00 AM-12:00 PM (Pacific)
Monday, 11/14/2016
  • 2:00 PM-3:00 PM (Eastern)
  • 1:00 PM-2:00 PM (Central)
  • 12:00 PM-1:00 PM (Mountain)
  • 11:00 AM-12:00 PM (Pacific)

Collaborating for Impact book coverIn a twenty-first-century academic library, its unique collections distinguish it from other libraries. Special collections and liaison librarian partnerships can have a tremendous impact on the work within the library and the university community. Librarians and their collaborative partners can use their expertise and creativity to increase exposure to special collections by working interdepartmentally on instruction, collection development, research, processing, and other projects. Through these experiences, librarians gain a deeper understanding of the roles of each department and work together to achieve strategic goals for the benefit of research and scholarly communities.  This two-part webcast series explores special collections and library liaison partnerships:

Webcast One: Collaborative Collection Stewardship Model: Special Collections and Liaison Librarian Partnerships (November 1, 2016)

The collaborative work shared in this webcast—collection stewardship—will highlight both the personal benefits and enriching experience of our shared work, and the positive impact that work has on faculty and students. With each librarian’s individual expertise and skillsets, together we are better equipped to provide a holistic, well-rounded perspective on the research process and scholarship. These collaborations spark creative thinking and promote modes of discovery for users and librarians.

The webcast will begin with comments from the moderator to frame the session, exploring the current academic library landscape. The editors of Collaborating for Impact: Special Collections and Liaison Librarian Partnerships will then offer their thoughts about collaborative collection development and project management. Two of the book’s contributors will then share their experiences working across departments to develop a comic book collection and subsequent outreach efforts. After the presentation, the moderator will open the discussion for participant questions and ideas.

Webcast Two: Collaborative Projects and Instruction: Special Collections and Liaison Librarian Partnerships (November 14, 2016)

The collaborative work shared in this webcast—collaborative instruction—will highlight both the personal benefits and enriching experience of our shared work, and the positive impact that work has on faculty and students. With each librarian’s individual expertise and skillsets, together we are better equipped to provide a holistic, well-rounded perspective on the research process and scholarship. These collaborations spark creative thinking and promote modes of discovery for users and librarians.

The webcast will begin with comments from the moderator to frame the session, exploring the current academic library landscape. The editors of Collaborating for Impact: Special Collections and Liaison Librarian Partnerships will then offer their thoughts about collaborative instruction and share an example from their work with the AIDS Education Posters Collection. Two of the book’s contributors will then describe their experiences promoting the Usigli Archive. After the presentation, the moderator will open the discussion for participant questions and ideas.

Learning Outcomes

From attending the first webcast, participants will:

  • Explore how the unique roles of special collections and liaison librarians enable them to achieve institutional goals, benefiting their research communities.
  • Learn a potential model for collaborative collection development and project management that builds upon the expertise of special collections and liaison librarians.
  • Apply content to participants’ own experiences to imagine collaborative possibilities.

From attending the second webcast, participants will:

  • Gain a deeper understanding of how the unique roles of special collections and liaison librarians enable them to best achieve institutional goals that benefit their research communities.
  • Learn a potential model for collaborative project management and instruction that builds upon the expertise of special collections and liaison librarians.
  • Apply content to participants’ own experiences to imagine collaborative possibilities.

Who Should Attend

People who are interested in collaborations across library departments, specifically developing partnerships between special collections and library liaisons.

Presenters

Webcast Series Moderator
Anne R. Kenney
became the Carl A. Kroch University Librarian at Cornell University in 2008. Active in the archival and preservation communities, Kenney is known internationally for her pioneering work in developing standards for digitizing library materials and research into digital preservation issues. She serves on the boards of the Council on Library and Information Resources and HathiTrust, and the visiting committees for MIT libraries and the Center for Jewish History. She is a fellow and past president of the Society of American Archivists and former board member for the Association of Research Libraries. Last year she won the prestigious Hugh Atkinson Award from the American Library Association for her leadership in research and library management.

Webcast Series Hosts/Introducers
Lori Birrell
is the Special Collections Librarian for Historical Manuscripts at the University of Rochester. Her research interests include leadership development, organizational change and culture. She has an MA in History from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, an MLIS from Simmons College, and will complete her EdD in Higher Education Administration in May 2017 at the University of Rochester.

Kristen Totleben is the Modern Languages and Cultures Librarian at the University of Rochester. She is the collections and outreach librarian for nine languages, Comparative Literature and Literary Translation Studies. Her research interests include working with special collections, critical visual literacy and organizational culture. She has an MA in Spanish and an MLIS from the University of Missouri.

Webcast One Presenters

Anna Culbertson is Assistant Head of Special Collections and University Archives at San Diego State University. She provides primary source research instruction, collaborates with teaching faculty on book history and graphic
design curricula, and curates the unit’s speculative fiction and comics arts collections. Her research interests include feminist science fiction and comics, documenting the gray literature of the women’s movement, critical librarianship, and ideas of utopia in speculative fiction and alternative religious movements. Prior to joining the library faculty at SDSU, she held positions at the Morgan Library & Museum and New York Public Library’s Berg Collection of English and American Literature. Anna has an MA in French from CUNY Queens College and an MS in Library and Information Science from the Palmer School at Long Island University.

Pamela Jackson is the subject librarian for Television, Film, Theatre, New Media and the Comic Arts at San Diego State University. Her research interests include diversity and culture as reflected in comic art, critical visual literacy,
and the impact of popular culture collections on teaching and learning. Her major publications include survey research and an edited book about international students and their library and technology needs, and a grant-funded humanities website, The Comic-Con Kids: Finding and Defining Fandom, which explores the emergence of comics, science fiction and fantasy in the youth counterculture movements of the 1970s. Pamela has a MA in English with an emphasis on Creative Writing from Sonoma State University and a MA in Library and Information Studies from the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Webcast Two Presenters

Katie Gibson is a Humanities Librarian and liaison to the departments of Spanish and Portuguese, French and Italian, Student Disability Services, and the German, Latin American Studies, and International Studies programs. She has worked extensively with Special Collections librarians and the Rodolfo Usigli archives, helping in their organization and including them in instruction.

William Modrow is Head, Walter Havighurst Special Collections and Archives. He has been collaborating with faculty and researchers for over 20 years designing course activities and research.

 

Registration

Cost

Participants can register for individual webcasts at the rates shown below or for the two-part series. 

Registration fees per Webcast:
ACRL member: $50
ALA member: $75
Nonmember: $90
Student: $40
Group*: $295

Registration fees per series:
ACRL member: $85
ALA member: $135
Nonmember: $160
Student: $65
Group*: $495

* Webcasts take place in an interactive, online classroom environment with one user/one login. If you select the group rate, one person must register, login, and keyboard during the event. A group registration allows an institution to project the Webcast to participants in the same location.

How to Register

  • Locate the webcast by the date of the event.
  • Select the "Register" link next to the Webcast title on ALA's webcast registration pageYou can register for each webcast a la carte or select the "ACRL Webcast Series Purchase: Collection Stewardship Part One & Two" under the November header.
  • You will need to log in with your ALA ID & password. If you do not have an ALA ID & password, you will be asked to create one in order to register.

Registrants will receive your Webcast access information one business day before the live Webcast.

Archive
Webcasts will be recorded and made available to registrants as an archive, so if you sign up but cannot attend the live event, you will receive the archived webcast recording.

Tech Requirements

ACRL Webcasts are held in an Adobe Connect virtual classroom. Speakers or a headset for listening to the presentation are required. You may ask questions through text-based chat.  Adobe works on both PC and Apple platforms.

Contact

If you have a question about an e-Learning opportunity or need to make arrangements for special assistance, please contact Margot Conahan (mconahan@ala.org).