STS Streaming Audio Demonstration Project

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About this Project

An STS Publications Committee task force is developing this demonstration site to illustrate the technical and administrative issues involved with promoting STS programs via the World Wide Web. The project documents production options and contains a collection of audio and slide show presentations originating from annual program tapes and Powerpoint presentations. Streaming formats could include RealAudio and Quicktime.

This demonstration project uses the STS Annual Program from June 26, 1999, New Orleans, LA, The Future is Here Changing Realities for Sci-Tech Librarians . Currently, these and other ALA program audio cassette tapes are available for sale from Teach'em, a subsidiary of Bonus Books, Inc. Chicago IL.

Give it a Try!

The tables below contain:
  • Selected sound bites to highlight moments within the presentations.
  • Audio/Presentation slide shows, combining both audio & visuals (Campbell & Jones presentations).
  • Entire program in a streamed format to test practicality and desirability of the whole enchilada.

Part 1. Soundbites (Presentation Highlights)

Presentation Highlights -- Sound Clips
Listen Highlight Speaker

RealAudio
Dr. Campbell outlines some of the changes in university environments impacting librarianship Dr. Jerry Campbell, Chief Information Officer (CIO), University Librarian and Dean, University Libraries, University of Southern California. Taken from his presenentation, "Science/Technology Librarians in a Brave New Paradigm."


RealAudio Dr. Campbell outlines strategies for dealing with a new era in librarianship. Dr. Jerry Campbell, from "Science/Technology Librarians in a Brave New Paradigm"


RealAudio Dr. Campbell foresees the "best of times" for science and technology librarians. Dr. Jerry Campbell, from "Science/Technology Librarians in a Brave New Paradigm"


RealAudio While things in science & technology librarianship change, Doug Jones focused on what remains the same. Doug Jones, Science-Engineering Librarian, University of Arizona. Taken from his presentation, "Old, New, Borrowed and Roux."


RealAudio Jones now discusses what's new, especially 'in-your-face' technology. Doug Jones, from "Old, New, Borrowed and Roux"


RealAudio Jones creates an analogy between cooking a roux and the future of science and technology librarianship. Doug Jones, from "Old, New, Borrowed and Roux"


RealAudio Clement sees increased collaboration with other sci/tech information professionals as a key component of librarians' futures. Gail Clement, Coordinator, Digital Library Services, Florida International University, Miami. Taken from her presentation, "What's a Nice Science Librarian Like You ...(doing on a project like this)?"


RealAudio Clement discusses data ownership and copyright as federal government agencies claim and exercise nonexclusive rights to government funded research. Gail Clement, from "What's a Nice Science Librarian Like You ...(doing on a project like this)?"




 


Part 2. Audio/Video Presentations (Requires Real Media Player)

"Science/Technology Librarians in a Brave New Paradigm" by Dr. Jerry Campbell (duration 33:38)
Part 1 (21:11) & Part 2 (12:27)

"Old, New, Borrowed and Roux" by Doug Jones (duration 23:35)


Part 3. Files for Downloading & Streaming.

Audio Files

File & Type

Time

Title Speaker

wav
Real Audio

0:27

Program Title Teach'em

wav
Real Audio

0:00-6:15


6:15-15:15

Welcome & Announcements


Introductions

Billie Jo Reinhart, Science and Engineering Librarian, Cleveland State University

Dawn Talbot, Science Librarian, University of California, San Diego

wav
Real Audio

34:09

 

 

"Science/Technology Librarians in a Brave New Paradigm"

 

Dr. Jerry Campbell, Chief Information Officer (CIO), University Librarian and Dean, University Libraries, University of Southern California

wav
Real Audio

25:01

 

"Old, New, Borrowed and Roux"

 

Doug Jones, Science-Engineering Librarian, University of Arizona

 

wav
Real Audio

43:34


"What's a Nice Science Librarian Like You ...(doing on a project like this)?" Conclusion.

Gail Clement, Coordinator, Digital Library Services, Florida International University, Miami

wav
Real Audio

35:04

Question & Answer Session. Conclusion.

Closing Remarks

Lea Wade, Science Librarian, University of New Orleans


Billie Joy Reinhart



 

Information about Audio/Video Streaming

The streaming technology demonstrated here allows users to "play" audio and video files from a Web site. The use of streaming negates the need to download large files to a local computer to be played, but rather, it allows them to be played from a remote Web server where they are stored. There is typically a delay of 10-30 seconds while the local application stores a buffer of information it has received before the audio or video starts to play. Streamed files don't require much bandwidth, so they can be played on computers that use modems to connect to the Internet.

A client application or "player" is required to view the streamed files. The most commonly used players are free, can be downloaded from the Internet, and are available for Windows, Macintosh, and Unix platforms.

The quality of the sound and picture being streamed is dependent on available bandwidth, or the amount of data that needs to be moved per second. Modem speeds between 28Kbps and 56Kbps, can be used as a guideline "lowest common denominator" typically available to most users. At these speeds, audio is comparable to a radio broadcast; video performs less well. The easiest way to judge this is to look at some examples.

There are a number of different technologies available for streaming files. For this project we used a RealNetworks server located at UT-Knoxville, with players and tools compatible with this technology.

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Information about this Demonstration Project

The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the efficacy of streaming as one solution for delivering information to a widely dispersed audience with relatively little cost. Audio tapes and PowerPoint slides from presentations given at the ALA Annual Conference can be .

Creating Streaming Files

Step 1 — Create the raw material for the project. Digitize audiocassettes onto recordable CD-ROM in the .cda (CD Audio) format. While different audio tools use different audio formats standards, it is easy to move from format-to-format using today's tools.

Step 2 — Use Quicktime for the initial "streamed" version of the files. Quicktime Pro is used to create .mov (Quicktime Movie) format files and .wav (Windows Audio) format files. The .mov files can be truly streamed via a Quicktime server. The .wav files cannot be streamed. Instead, in a less efficient process, .wav files are downloaded and then played by the listener. Other applications can be used to create .wav formats.

Step 3 — Use the Windows Sound Record (standard application with the Windows operating systems) to edit .wav files into the audio individual files to accompany slideshow presentations and server as 'soundbites.'

Step 4 — Use RealProducer (freeware version) to convert .wav files into RealAudio streaming files.

Step 5 — Use RealSlideshow (freeware version) to reconstruct the Campbell and Jones Powerpoint presentations into RealAudio Slideshows, adding audio to the visual presentations.

Step 6 — Use RealServer (freeware version) to provide the streaming platform for all RealAudio applications.

Step 7 — Load files onto http and RealAudio streaming servers.

Outstanding Issues

While project's technical hurdles proved easy to clear, a few more difficult administrative hurdles remain. Specifically, if the Section wishes to pursue audiostreaming further, the following steps must be taken:

  1. Determine copyright for the presentations. In this project, copyright was assumed to be the property of the program speakers and is noted as such on the audiofiles.
  2. Determine nature of Teach'em's distribution contract with ALA and ACRL and how that contract impacts electronic audiostreaming projects.
  3. Determine who can supply the server support for audio file distribution.

Special Thanks

University of Tennessee's Alan Wallace and Ross Singer deserve our thanks. Alan performed the initial digitization of the program audio cassettes, and Ross administers UT's RealAudio server.

This site developed by David Atkins, University of Tennessee, Knoxville and Philip Herold, Cornell University. 

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Copyright © 2011, STS
Last updated: August 16, 2011

Please send comments, questions, and suggestions to  David Atkins and Philip Herold