2000 STS Conference Poster Session

sts

The Association of College and Research Libraries Science and Technology Section and the
ALCTS CMDS Collection Development and Electronic Media Committee present

"COMMUNICATION AND INFORMATION MODELS FOR THE NEW MILLENNIUM:
SCIENTISTS AND LIBRARIANS FACE THE FUTURE"

Poster Session and STS Reception

Monday, July 10, 2000 
10:45 AM - 12:30 PM
Marriot Downtown - Chicago Ballroom E

STS RECEPTION

The STS reception will be held in conjunction with the poster session presentations. Traditionally, the STS reception has been held in the evening at a sci-tech related site. After soliciting member input, the Section decided to break with tradition and experiment with a daytime, Continental breakfast-reception. It is hoped that this venue will attract more STS members and perhaps attract some potential new members since our program will have just concluded in the room adjacent to where the poster session is being held. Come and enjoy the reception and poster presentations while relaxing and conversing with STS members. 

ABSTRACTS OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS

THE CONTOURS OF CYBERSPACE: AN ADVENTURE IN WEB-BASED EDUCATION
"Contours of Cyberspace," a 4-credit experimental course at the University of Oregon, focuses on the social, ethical, legal, and political issues surrounding cyberspace. Students learn to exploit the Internet as an information resource through web searching, web publishing, and critical thinking. In spring 1999 it was taught completely online using WebCT courseware. This poster will focus on instructional design issues, the choice of software, student-to-student interactions, student evaluations, and successes and challenges. Further information is available at http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~cbell/contours99/. Colleen Bell, University of Oregon, Knight Library, 1299 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403-1299, voice: 541/346-1817, fax: 541/346-3485, e-mail: cbell@darkwing.uoregon.edu



NEW MILEAGE OUT OF OLD TIRES: USING THE THERMODEX DATABASE TO MINE A SCIENCE LIBRARY COLLECTION FOR THERMODYNAMIC INFORMATION
ThermoDex ( http://thermodex.lib.utexas.edu/) is a Web-based finding aid developed in 1995 by the Mallet Chemistry Library at the University of Texas at Austin. It provides Property Name and Compound Type indexing to over 150 print thermodynamic data collections and handbooks and allows users to identify specific printed resources containing the desired data. A server-side JavaScript interface queries the database and returns a list of handbooks that may contain the data sought. ThermoDex serves as a link between older but still essential print resources and newer Web tools. David Flaxbart, University of Texas at Austin, Welch Hall 2.132, Austin TX 78712, voice: 512/495-4600, fax: 512/495-4225, e-mail: flaxbart@uts.cc.utexas.edu


ORGANIZING AGRICULTURAL INTERNET RESOURCES: HOW AGNIC ORGANIZED AGRICULTURAL BIOTECHNOLOGY
AgNIC (Agriculture Network Information Center, http://www.agnic.org) is a collaborative effort to bring quality agricultural information to the Internet. Members provide coverage of a subject of their choosing and online reference to users. The Science & Technology Services Team at the University of Maryland, College Park is taking the lead in the subject of Agricultural Biotechnology in collaboration with NAL. This poster will examine the process of bringing up a site, including the selection process and decisions, communication issues, design, workflow and how a team approach facilitates the implementation, ongoing development, and maintenance of this type of subject site. Melanie A. Gardner, National Agricultural Library, 10301 Baltimore Ave., Beltsville, MD 20705, voice: 301/504-6813, fax: 301/504-7473, e-mail: mgardner@nal.usda.gov and Alesia McManus, University of Maryland, 3118 McKeldin Library, College Park, MD 20742-7011, voice: 301/405-9285, fax: 301/405-7111, e-mail: am245@umail.umd.edu


CITATION ANALYSIS OF UNDERGRADUATE BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT HONORS PAPERS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF DENVER
Citations in undergraduate Biology Department honors papers written at the University of Denver were analyzed to see how use of library resources has changed over the last ten years, specifically are students citing Internet resources, or are they still using only traditional book and journal resources? Has there been an increase in the number of journals cited? Has the percentage of recently published materials increased? This poster will demonstrate the kinds of resources that undergraduate science students are using today versus ten years ago. Joseph R. Kraus, Science Librarian, and Patricia Fisher, Associate Director for Collection Development, University of Denver, Penrose Library, 2150 E. Evans Ave., Denver, CO 80208, voice: 303/871-4586, fax: 303/871-2290, e-mail: jokraus@du.edu


INTEGRATING CHEMICAL INFORMATION INTO THE UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM: THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA EXPERIENCE
This is a collaborative effort between the library and the department of chemistry to make chemical information an integral part of the undergraduate chemistry curriculum. Students meet with librarians for 4 hours, during which they are instructed in the history, structure and organization of chemical information, and structure, reaction and properties searching. Various instructional techniques will be used, such as lectures, demonstrations, hands-on sessions, and student presentations. This instruction is integrated into a chemical synthesis assignment. The librarians' goal is to educate for lifelong learning and help students develop transferable skills needed in a research environment of the 21st Century. Ibironke Lawal, Science and Engineering Library Clark Hall, University of Virginia, McCormick Road, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903, Voice: 804/924-6837, Fax: 804/924-4338, E-mail: iol4n@virginia.edu


EDUCATING E-PRINT USERS: INCORPORATING NEW MODELS OF SCIENTIFIC COMMUNICATION IN LIBRARY INSTRUCTION PROGRAMS
Scientific publication models have long been used in teaching research methods. Changing communication patterns, however, necessitate modifications in instructional content. Electronic preprints (e-prints) are transforming authors into publishers and archivists. The percent of e-prints that later become peer-reviewed articles is unknown, making their place within communication models problematic. This poster describes efforts at CSUH to educate students, for whom the Internet is becoming the primary research locus, about e-prints, peer review, and emerging patterns of scientific communication on the Internet in light of similar efforts nationwide. Kate Manuel, University Library, California State University, Hayward, 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward, CA 94542, voice: 510/885-2974, fax: 510/885-2049, e-mail: kmanuel@csuhayward.edu


PROJECT EUCLID: A COOPERATIVE MATHEMATICS PUBLISHING EFFORT
Project Euclid is a partnership between Cornell University Library and Duke University Press to advance effective and affordable scholarly communication in theoretical and applied mathematics and statistics. Authors can utilize the preprint server to facilitate rapid dissemination of research and to submit preprints to peer-reviewed journals. A password-protected area and toolkit is available for editors and reviewers to streamline the peer review and editorial process. Once the journal articles are ready, editors can upload them to issues on the Euclid site. Journals will gain added exposure via Euclid and will benefit from advanced user features that they cannot afford individually. Jean Poland, and Zsuzsa Koltay, Cornell University, 293 Clark Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 voice: 607/255-4016, Fax: 607/255-5288, e-mail: jp126@cornell.edu


LIBRARY SERVICES FOR A WEB BASED TURFGRASS MANAGEMENT PROGRAM
Distance learning at Penn State, known as the 'World Campus' ( http://www.worldcampus.psu.edu), has the same right to library resources as any physical Penn State campus. The College of Agricultural Sciences supports a 15 to 16 credit-hour Turfgrass Management Certificate program that is taught entirely through the World Campus. Providing library services to this program is challenging, since each class may contain students from anywhere in the world. This poster describes the efforts of the University Libraries to support World Campus students in general, and the Turfgrass Management students specifically, as they access information in support of their academic pursuits. Helen Smith, Agricultural Sciences Librarian, Life Sciences Library, 408 Paterno Library, University Park, PA 16802, voice: 814/865-3706, fax: 814/863-9684, e-mail: hfs@psulias.psu.edu


VENDOR TABLE

Representatives from Questia will be on hand to discuss their products and services relating to e-journals and digitization.

 


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Last updated: June 12, 2000

Comments to Ed Lener