Newsletter Checklist

Please let me know if you are NOT planning to do a newsletter. Otherwise I will expect one.

  • Volume/Issue Number consistent with previous issues (if there’s a question about what issue you’re on, please contact me).
  • Correct Date (ie., fall or spring + year)
  • ISSN Number
    • AAMES 1548-4343
    • AFAS 1076-8955
    • ANSS 0888-5559
    • ARTS 0666-2427
    • CJCLS 0888-1405
    • CLS 0887-3550
    • DLS 1522-1806
    • EBSS 0887-5189 
    • IS 1085-0724
    • LES 1076-8947
    • LPSS 0885-7342
    • RBMS 0743-1481
    • SEES 0897-6465
    • STS 0888-6563
    • ULS 1539-2619
    • WESS 0734-4503
    • WSS 0895-691X
  • New: No Page Limit!
  • Copyright (+current year)
    For example: © American Library Association, 2014.
  • Correct contact information for ALA/ACRL:
    ACRL, 50 East Huron Street, Chicago, IL 60611, (800) 545-2433, ext. 2523, www.acrl.org
  • Include publishing information similar to the following on front page, back page, or in masthead:
    The XXXX newsletter is a biannual electronic publication of the XXXX Section of the Association of College & Research Libraries, a division of the American Library Association; 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 60611; (800) 545-2433, ext. 2523; www.acrl.org.
  • Include editor information and submission deadlines, if desired
  • Pages numbered correctly
  • Spelling (run spell check)
  • Double-check to see that page numbers on index (if there is one) match articles. Also check "continued on" and "continued from" stories to ensure they flow correctly.
  • ALA/ACRL organization and conference logos are high resolution, not copies from the Web
  • If you need electronic copies, please contact me
  • When resizing, hold down the Shift button to maintain proportions and avoid stretching logos disproportionately
  • Photos and graphics appear correctly
  • Include photo credits for all pictures appearing in newsletter
  • Have sections chair or someone from your publications committee review it before sending me final copy.
  • Embed all fonts in PDF files (See instructions for converting to PDF and instructions from printer)
  • Let me know if you want to send to membership via e-mail
    • PDF or a URL?
    • Personalized greeting?
    • To be sent out when newsletters are approved and uploaded.

Common Problems with Newsletters

Fonts that aren’t embedded properly. This is the number one problem with newsletters since we’ve begun submitting them via PDF. Everyone uses a different program and has different software, so there is not one set of directions that will help with this. Most programs do have options to create or export your document into a PDF. Instead of blindly hitting "OK" when it asks, go through the options and select those that will embed fonts or include them in the document. (See the handouts for instructions and options.) Just because it looks OK on your computer doesn’t mean it will look good on mine... or the printer’s. If there is any question, please contact me before sending.

Missing or incorrect publishing information. There needs to be a statement about the regularity of the newsletter as well as contact information for ALA and/or ACRL (see above). This is usually followed by the copyright information.

Copy timeliness is past or irrelevant. Don’t just fill space because you can. Think of when newsletters will mail and how to make your news matter. If you need more copy, we can send you ideas. I hope to send out ACRL-related copy before you get too far along so you can include it if you want. If you have to reduce the pages, try 4 or 6.

Graphics. As noted above, graphics taken directly from the Web do not reproduce well in the printed form. If you need a conference logo or any other ALA logo, please contact me and I will get you a printable electronic version. In general, avoid using. gifs wherever possible. For photographs, stick with .tif files or high res .jpgs; for line art, use .eps files. If a .gif is your only option, decide whether the quality is really worth it. Pictures are great, but if they’re muddy and dark, they don’t lend much to the newsletter. A good way to determine how a pic will look in the final form is to make a regular copy of it and see how it looks. If it looks awful, chances are it won’t look very good coming from the printer either. Their equipment may give you better results, but don’t expect it to work miracles.

Colored backgrounds. Lightly shaded backgrounds are a good way to break things up, but again, you have to be careful not to make the background so dark that it’s difficult to read the text. The copier rule applies here as well. If the copy is difficult to read, chances are, the final newsletter will also be difficult to read.

Orphans. When an article continues in the next column or on the next page, avoid leaving one line of text either at the top or bottom of the column or page. This is called an orphan and it tends to inhibit the flow of the newsletter. While it’s not a big deal, the more skilled you become at newsletter creation, the better it is to catch these little things.