Shakespeare and Libraries: On Stage, Online, and Off the Shelves

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Annual Program of LES/Co-sponsored by the Theatre Library Association – ALA Annual 2007

Prompted by the landmark festival Shakespeare in Washington, running from January-June 2007, the LES/TLA Program addressed how library resouces, especially those of the Folger Shakespeare Library, are used to prepare for theatrical productions of Shakespeare's plays; how libraries can be involved in public programming (readings/performances, lectures, exhibitions, blogs) pertaining to Shakespeare; and how this classic figure is making the transition to the electronic world.


Panelists:

Georgianna Ziegler, Louis B. Thalheimer Head of Reference, Folger Shakespeare Library, and 2006 President, Shakespeare Association of America

James L. Harner, Samuel Rhea Gammon Professor of Liberal Arts, Texas A&M University, and Editor, Wold Shakespeare Bibliography Online

Carole Levin , Willa Cather Professor of Early Modern History, University of Nebraska-Lincoln and NEH Fellow at the Folger Shakespeare Library, 2006-2007.

Caleen Sinnette Jennings, Professor, Department of Performing Arts, American University

Kathy Johnson, Moderator, Professor of Libraries, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

 

 

 

 

The Literatures in English Section (LES) is part of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), a division of the American Library Association (ALA). Members of LES are professionally involved in the acquisition, organization, and use of information sources related to the study and teaching of literatures written in English. For more information, to join our list, or to complete a committee interest form, visit our web site at http://www.ala.org/acrl/les.

You are welcome to join us at any of our meetings or discussion groups during the Conference.

 

 

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Most recent update: May 5, 2004.