Learning Standards Hot Links

1. Inquire, think critically, and gain knowledge.

1.1 Skills

1.1.1

Follow an inquiry-based process in seeking knowledge in curricular subjects, and make the real-world connection for using this process in own life.

 

YouthLearn: Technology, Media, and Project Based Learning to Inspire Young Minds external link icon
YouthLearn takes you through all of the steps used in planning an inquiry based unit. An extensive overview of inquiry learning is provided including checklists, scheduling models, and evaluation procedures.

Concept to Classroom external link icon
This site is not to be missed if you want your students to begin doing inquiry based learning. The Concept to Classroom model gives great detail in the planning process for inquiry based learning including explanation, demonstration, exploration, and implementation.

Illinois Math and Science Association: Problem-Based Learning Network external link icon
The Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy has created a thorough model on problem based learning (PBL). PBL breaks down the process into three parts: Understand the problem, explore the curriculum, and resolve problem. Each part has subsections to further break down the process to resemble the Big6 process that many students are already familiar with.

Teach-Nology external link icon
This list of inquiry-based websites will take teachers to a wide range of websites to help teachers become more familiar with the process. 

1.1.5

Evaluate information found in selected sources on the basis of accuracy, validity, appropriateness for needs, importance, and social and cultural context.

 

Kathy Schrock's Guide for Educators - Critical Evaluation Survey's and Resources external link icon
Kathy Schrock provides a plethora of information for website evaluations. There forms that you can download for students from elementary to high school as well as specific forms for blogs, podcasts, and virtual tours. An extensive list of websites is also provided, which include sites about evaluation and critical analysis. 

1.1.9

Collaborate with others to broaden and deepen understanding.

 

Illinois Math and Science Association: Problem-Based Learning Network external link icon
The Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy has created a thorough model on problem based learning (PBL). PBL breaks down the process into three parts: Understand the problem, explore the curriculum, and resolve problem. Each part has subsections to further break down the process to resemble the Big6 process that many students are already familiar with.

1.2 Dispositions in Action

1.2.1

Display initiative and engagement by posing questions and investigating the answers beyond the collection of superficial facts.

 

MAIS K-6 Science Inquiry, Investigation, and Design Technology - Productive Questions external link icon
In this article, Dr. Vickie Harry breaks down inquiry questions that students can pose into six different categories: attention focusing, measuring and counting, comparison, action, problem-posing, and reasoning questions. By teaching students to ask questions in this manner, they become critical thinkers who are not satisfied with questions that can be answered by simply "yes" or "no".

1.2.5

Demonstrate adaptability by changing the inquiry focus, questions, resources, or strategies when necessary to achieve success.

 

MAIS K-6 Science Inquiry, Investigation, and Design Technology - Productive Questions external link icon
In this article, Dr. Vickie Harry breaks down inquiry questions that students can pose into six different categories: attention focusing, measuring and counting, comparison, action, problem-posing, and reasoning questions. By teaching students to ask questions in this manner, they become critical thinkers who are not satisfied with questions that can be answered by simply "yes" or "no".



1.3 Responsibilities

1.3.1

Respect copyright/intellectual property rights of creators and producers.

 

Copyright Kids external link icon
This excellent site for upper elementary to high school students breaks down copyright into easy to understand wording. Copyright Kids also provides additional links, information on how students can register their own works, and an interactive quiz. There is additional information for parents and teachers. 

1.3.4

Contribute to the exchange of ideas within the learning community.

 

Edublogs external link icon

Wikispaces external link icon
Students are increasingly utilizing technology to communicate with one another. By using blogs and wikis, students can collaborate with one another while doing projects or studying certain topics. Teachers can also create blogs and wikis to generate discussions on curricular items.

1.3.5

Use information technology responsibly.

 

BrainPOP: Digital Citizenship external link icon
Elementary students can easily understand the important aspects of digital citizenship from the subscription site BrainPOP. Students can view movies and interactive articles on a variety of digital citizenship topics including cyberbullying, digital etiquette, information privacy, plagiarism, social networking, and more!

Stop Cyberbullying external link icon
This student friendly site breaks down cyberbullying into categories based on age (kids, tweens, and teens). There is additional information for parents, teachers, and law enforcement. Educators can learn about what cyberbullying is, what they can do to help prevent it, and gain advice on what to do once an incident of cyberbullying occurs.

Digital Citizenship: Using Technology Appropriately external link icon
Digital Citizenship is rapidly becoming an important topic for students to know and understand. This site gives an overview of the nine elements of digital citizenship as well as activities that teachers and parents can use to help explain digital citizenship to their students.

1.4 Self-Assessment Strategies

1.4.1

Monitor own information-seeking processes for effectiveness and progress, and adapt as necessary.

 

Read, Write, Think: Promoting Student Self-Assessment external link icon
Read, Write, Think provides teachers with five different strategies to being having their students self-assess. Several of these strategies are interactive and require students to be constantly aware of what they are doing and learning.

Critical Thinking.org - Structures for Student Self-Assessment  external link icon
Critical thinking and self-assessment go hand in hand. The Foundation for Critical Thinking has given tips for teachers to help them implement student self-assessment in four major areas: reading, speaking, listening, and writing.


Standard 2